Haswell Overclocking, 4790K heat issues

Discussion in 'Overclocking & Cooling' started by dr.stevil, Jun 8, 2018.

  1. dr.stevil

    dr.stevil [H]ardForum Junkie

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    I managed to snag this CPU, used, for a mild upgrade to my aging 4770 system (non-K).

    When I installed it, I noticed a fairly gnarly scratch on the bottom of the CPU cooler, that I'm wishing I took a picture of now... but decided to install anyway since it never gave me an issue with my 4770. The cooler is a Noctua dual tower, btw.

    On stock clocks, everything looks great. Idle temps are around 28-32* and in Cinebench under 100% load, doesn't get above 60*.

    In my BIOS/UEFI, I kept everything on auto and just bumped the CPU multiplier from Auto, to 45 (4.5ghz total;100mhz over stock boost clocks,). At idle, temps are pretty much identical to stock but under load, in cinebench, temps climbed close to 90* on two cores in particular (which I should note, were 25-30* hotter than the other two). In Prime, they instantly hit 100* so I shut it down.

    Do these chips just run naturally hot? I assumed I'd be able to get 100hmz out of it at least. Could it be a problem with that scratch on the cooler? Or am I doing something wrong with the overclock? I've never attempted OC'ing haswell before, so this platform is new to me.
     
  2. hititnquitit

    hititnquitit n00bie

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    you have to manually set your cpu voltage or the chipset will set it to whatever it wants. usually alot more than it needs. which is likely why your temps are so high. i would pull the heatsink and make sure that its making GOOD SOLID contact. you definitely have an issue with the scratch. what kind of tim are you using? do you have another hsf to test with by chance?
     
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  3. dr.stevil

    dr.stevil [H]ardForum Junkie

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    Awesome! That never occurred to me about the automatic voltage. I assume it wouldn't need anything more than stock voltage to push it to 4.5ghz?

    I'll pull the heat sync and see if I can fix it. I assume just some sandpaper and a block would do the trick? (or hell, maybe I'll just go with an AIO water-block and pack this one up for a backup). Unfortunately I don't have another HSF laying around that's not in use.

    I'm using some Thermaltake compound (TG-7) that I found at BestBuy. Probably not the best you can buy... but good enough to get the job done.
     
  4. JNavy89GT

    JNavy89GT [H]ard|Gawd

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    see what reference voltages are for people who've used that cpu and oc's etc... Set manually in bios as per above suggestion.

    If you lap the heatsink, get the wet/dry sandpaper in the automotive section and you'll be looking at 600-800 grit IMO and may even finer for a finish sanding. Try to find a piece of thicker glass as a base and wet the sand paper and try to keep base of heatsink from rocking while sanding. Not hard IMO. I'd run what u have and not worry about getting a different cooler. I don't think the scratch is the problem. Probably mobo forcing too much voltage and the TIM on those cpu's between IHS and cpu is the sux as well.
     
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  5. pendragon1

    pendragon1 [H]ardForum Junkie

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    ^ that's what I would say too.
     
  6. dr.stevil

    dr.stevil [H]ardForum Junkie

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    So you were 100% correct! The bios was adding waaaay too much voltage and caused it to overheat. I’ve been fiddling with it and currently have it stable @ 4.5ghz. As time allows, I’ll probably try pushing it to 4.7.

    Appreciate the help fellas
     
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