Hard Drive Issue

Joined
Sep 3, 2015
Messages
55
Windows keeps telling me to backup my data, and bios S.M.A.R.T error on this hard drive. I've ran multiple disk scans and they all come back fine. I was hoping to get more information about this error.

 
M

mls1995

Guest
I'd say backup your data ASAP and RMA the drive. Unless you just don't care about your data.
 
Joined
Sep 3, 2015
Messages
55
Data is backed up already. I'll see if I can RMA the drive. Just wasn't sure what "Reallocated Sectors Count" meant. This is what I found.

"Count of reallocated sectors. When the hard drive finds a read/write/verification error, it marks that sector as "reallocated" and transfers data to a special reserved area (spare area). This process is also known as remapping, and reallocated sectors are called "remaps". The raw value normally represents a count of the bad sectors that have been found and remapped. Thus, the higher the attribute value, the more sectors the drive has had to reallocate. This allows a drive with bad sectors to continue operation; however, a drive which has had any reallocations at all is significantly more likely to fail in the near future.[3] While primarily used as a metric of the life expectancy of the drive, this number also affects performance. As the count of reallocated sectors increases, the read/write speed tends to become worse because the drive head is forced to seek to the reserved area whenever a remap is accessed. If sequential access speed is critical, the remapped sectors can be manually marked as bad blocks in the file system in order to prevent their use."
 
Last edited:

Astral Abyss

2[H]4U
Joined
Jun 15, 2004
Messages
2,961
It means you've got a bad sector on that drive that data can't be written to. It's a bad sign.
 

drescherjm

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Nov 19, 2008
Messages
14,936
A few bad sectors is not necessarily a bad sign. I have quite a few drives with bad sectors in raid arrays at work (that have had bad sectors for several years and have no issues at all caused by that). It is however a bad sign if the # of bad sectors is quite large and expands over time. The difference is if the bad sector is caused by an isolated media defect or a mechanical or head failure.

In this case the user has 2005 bad sectors which is probably more than just an isolated media defect.
 
Joined
Sep 3, 2015
Messages
55
A few bad sectors is not necessarily a bad sign. I have quite a few drives with bad sectors in raid arrays at work (that have had bad sectors for several years and have no issues at all caused by that). It is however a bad sign if the # of bad sectors is quite large and expands over time. The difference is if the bad sector is caused by an isolated media defect or a mechanical or head failure.

In this case the user has 2005 bad sectors which is probably more than just an isolated media defect.

Where are you coming up with 2005 bad sectors?
 

SomeGuy133

2[H]4U
Joined
Apr 12, 2015
Messages
3,447
Where are you coming up with 2005 bad sectors?

I assume he typed the raw value into a hex decimal converter.

HD sentinel gives you everything converted and keeps logs too. Its an awesome program if you got a bunch of HDDs like 10 or more.

Beats my Failing HDD which has 1254. You need to remove data ASAP!!!
 

Nenu

[H]ardened
Joined
Apr 28, 2007
Messages
20,098
Reallocated sectors are usually ok until they cause a smart error.
Faulty sectors when detected have the data copied off (reallocated) to spare sectors and are then marked bad.
When too many occur you can run out of spare sectors and can indicate the drive has a more serious problem.

You have had fair warning, time to backup your data (you have, this is for others reading) and stop using the drive.
 

_CiPHER_

Weaksauce
Joined
Sep 30, 2015
Messages
74
The real risk is not that you run out of reserve sectors, but that before bad sectors can be swapped for a reserve sector, they become unreadable. If so, they would show up as Current Pending Sector in the SMART data. Those are the most dangerous, since a single unreadable sector can wreak havoc on legacy storage.

However, a drive with bad sectors is perfectly usable when you use modern filesystems of the 3rd generation. Only 1st and 2nd filesystems are vulnerable, since they have no methods to protect against unreadable sectors, nor any other kind of on-disk corruption. With ZFS, drives like these could operate for many years very reliably, because bad sectors does not indicate impending failure of the motor (spinup problems) or problems with the head (seek errors). They just have become unreliable for legacy storage.
 

AlienTech

Limp Gawd
Joined
Sep 30, 2004
Messages
286
A few bad sectors is not necessarily a bad sign. I have quite a few drives with bad sectors in raid arrays at work (that have had bad sectors for several years and have no issues at all caused by that). It is however a bad sign if the # of bad sectors is quite large and expands over time. The difference is if the bad sector is caused by an isolated media defect or a mechanical or head failure.

In this case the user has 2005 bad sectors which is probably more than just an isolated media defect.

Model : ST2000DL003-9VT166
01 115 _99 __6 000005404C48 Read Error Rate
04 _98 _98 _20 0000000008BF Start/Stop Count
05 _50 _50 _36 000000008128 Reallocated Sectors Count
07 _87 _60 _30 000024ED5CB3 Seek Error Rate
09 _83 _82 __0 000000003D76 Power-On Hours
0A 100 100 _97 000000000000 Spin Retry Count
0C 100 100 _20 000000000228 Power Cycle Count
B7 _68 _68 __0 000000000020 Vendor Specific
BC 100 _95 __0 00110012004B Command Timeout
BD _86 _86 __0 00000000000E High Fly Writes
BE _72 _44 _45 00041C1C001C Airflow Temperature
C0 100 100 __0 0000000000ED Power-off Retract Count
C1 _99 _99 __0 000000000940 Load/Unload Cycle Count
C2 _28 _56 __0 00190000001C Temperature
C3 _31 _15 __0 000005404C48 Hardware ECC recovered
C7 200 199 __0 0000000002CB UltraDMA CRC Error Count
F0 100 253 __0 5EC40000304F Head Flying Hours
F1 100 253 __0 0000715F688E Total Host Writes
F2 100 253 __0 0000E888DD84 Total Host Reads

Drive has been working fine even when showing red.. It went up fast at first but now it is like 2-3 sectors a week.. So the number is not what matter but where the sectors are positioned. I have had drives fail with 1 or 2 sectors when they were in the MBR area or MFT areas..
 
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