Getting the full 300Mbps on a Linksys N Gigabit Router

HoppyChris

Limp Gawd
Joined
Jan 23, 2008
Messages
313
It's likely your channel width. In the 2.4 Ghz band you'll get 130 at 20 mhz width and 260 at 40 mhz, but your wireless router and your client device both need to support that. Look for settings on your driver and in the setup page for your router.
 
Joined
Jan 17, 2007
Messages
624
The only option is 20 and auto (20 or 40). And auto doesn't seem to open it up. Could someone explain to me that flashing of a router?
 

keenan

2[H]4U
Joined
Aug 5, 2009
Messages
2,695
You won't do much better. That's about the practical limit for 802.11n, especially on 2.4GHz. If you get a good MIMO NIC for your client and move to 5GHz you might do marginally better, but over 160Mbps is very unlikely. Your result is actually very good for the gear you have.
 

awesomo

Gawd
Joined
Mar 20, 2010
Messages
528
You can force the setting in your wireless card drivers and/or upgrade the firmware on the router to have a 40mhz only option.

That said, Keenan is right, you don't want to use 40mhz in the 2.4ghz range. Why? Think of it this way. You only have 3 clean channels. 1, 6, and 11 each 22mhz wide with 5mhz spacing. If you chose channel 3 in 40mhz mode, all of a sudden you just monopolized over 80% of the spectrum that a bunch of other device interfere with and throughput could actually decline over 20mhz mode. Now, if you have 5ghz, that spectrum has at leased 10 clean channels to use, but you theoretically sacrifice range...
 

4x4not

Gawd
Joined
Mar 26, 2007
Messages
527
The only way I could get a full 300mbps on my old laptop (with upgraded Intel 802.11n tri-antenna card) was to run it at 5Ghz, wide (40Mhz). With the router in the same room I got 260-300 most of the time.
 

megabit

n00b
Joined
Jun 6, 2009
Messages
10
IMHO, you are nearing full potential throughput. Wireless medium always has been a half-duplex operation.
 

awesomo

Gawd
Joined
Mar 20, 2010
Messages
528
The only way I could get a full 300mbps on my old laptop (with upgraded Intel 802.11n tri-antenna card) was to run it at 5Ghz, wide (40Mhz). With the router in the same room I got 260-300 most of the time.
Now I know your connection manager said that speed, but what was your actual real world speed one way? In the same room on 5ghz I maxed out throughput downloading at 120mbits. I have an Intel Wireless N series tri Antenna card as well.
 

4x4not

Gawd
Joined
Mar 26, 2007
Messages
527
Never really checked my max potential. It was just my laptop. But it was a huge improvement over 802.11g
 

space@pe

n00b
Joined
Sep 12, 2008
Messages
54
go into your router and change to wireless N or A perhaps. im no genius at wireless stuff.
hehe just my 2 cents.
 

staticlag

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Mar 26, 2010
Messages
1,679
Wireless is half duplex, for each packet it must send a confirmation back, this takes half the available bandwidth.

So in reality wireless "g" 54 Mbps really only transfers data at 22 Mbps (3 MB/sec max)

Or draft " n" 300 Mbps really only transfers at 150 Mbps max (rougly 19 MB/sec max) - Though with lots of channel bonding you can get more, but that is hypothetical, and with all the interference from microwaves, portable phones, etc I doubt consumers will ever see this.

You will NEVER see the advertised bandwidth on these boxes.
 

mattjw916

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Mar 10, 2005
Messages
1,289
I'm going to start a company that does nothing but "wireless speed optimization" based on the volume of these threads.

You will NEVER see the advertised bandwidth on these boxes.

This. That's not to mention the overhead of TCP/IP itself which is significant.
 
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