Dumb question coming

Discussion in 'SSDs & Data Storage' started by Cataulin, Mar 19, 2013.

  1. Cataulin

    Cataulin [H]ard|Gawd

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    I was the recent recipient of free aluminum switch rails from my job. I was wondering if any companies actually make servers that would fit into them. This will be for learning purposes and eventually a home server setup in the future.
     
  2. staticlag

    staticlag [H]ard|Gawd

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    It depends.

    Some rails are only built for a specific server.

    Others are universal and will fit a variety of cases.

    Also some rails are meant to be mounted on the inside of a rack while others on the outer part. It will depend on which rack style you have as to if they will even fit or not.

    Short answer: It's complicated... It's rarely a bolt up and go affair
     
  3. Cataulin

    Cataulin [H]ard|Gawd

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    I see. The rails I got are threaded so they would have to bolt onto the front. I do have two sets I was planning on using in unison so they would bolt on both sides. Just not sure if actuall made them that size.


    Wait. dammit I've been meaning to say racks not rails. Like the tall ones in this image:

    [​IMG]
     
  4. patrickdk

    patrickdk Gawd

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    well, if the space between the rails is a normal 17.75 inchs, it's a normal 19" rack, and that is standard.

    I also have some 23" racks, but it's hard to find gear for those, normally I'll modify them down to a normal 19" when we decommision their gear.
     
  5. unhappy_mage

    unhappy_mage [H]ard|DCer of the Month - October 2005

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    Sometimes two-post racks are designed to be bolted to the floor. That would be a good first step towards putting heavy servers in them. If you can get two, space them at a reasonable distance (say 30" or 36", depending on what equipment you want to put in them) and align them correctly, that would be a reasonable method of mounting a server. The main thing to consider is the mechanical stability; you don't want the rack to fall over on your dog or kid or foot, and servers are much heavier and less balanced than typical two-post equipment like switches or patch panels.

    Some companies make two-post mounting solutions for their servers; for example, here's Dell's guide to mounting a 2650 to a two-post rack.