Dt 770 pro for gaming?

trick0502

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Anyone use these for gaming? or how about open back like the dt 990 pro?
 

THUMPer

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I had dt 990 pros. I returned them for Philips Fidelio X2HR. I like the Philips for gaming. But I think the 770 would be fine for gaming, with the EQ setup properly.
 

trick0502

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Is there really a big difference between ohms? As of now I don’t have an amo and will be using mb sound.
 

THUMPer

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I'm no audiophile. But from my understanding, if you dont have an amp to push the ohms, you may not get the fullest sound, or they may be too quiet.
 

GotNoRice

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The DT770 Pros are great gaming headphones. There is a reason why the design has stood the test of time. Compared to the 990 Pros, I'd say that the 990s have a more airy sound, while the 770s have better bass. Overall their sound signature is still very similar. I prefer closed headphones (such as the 770 Pro) for gaming because they block a lot of the background noise in the room, making it easier to hear more details in the game.

The DT770 Pro 80ohm is the model that I have, and I like it quite a bit. I would stick with a lower-ohm model if you are going to power them directly from your motherboard. In general, higher ohms is better when you have an amp that can supply a lot of voltage. Lower ohms is better when you have an amp that can supply a lot of amps. Low ohms is better when you are using them directly connected to your computer or your phone. Higher ohms can be better when using a real amp, depending on the amp design. I think the 80 ohm model is a good compromise as opposed to going all the way to the 32 ohm model. The 250 ohm model would work well enough in most situations. Avoid the 600 ohm model.
 

IdiotInCharge

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You also have the 'mostly open' DT880 250Ohm set... but in general, I'd only really pay attention to the DT770. If you're going open, go Sennheiser, unless you're paying up for the DT1990.

As for impedance, I'll echo the 80Ohm recommendation, but 250Ohm should be fine for these efficient designs. I've had good luck with my DT880s using decent onboard and they're actually loud enough with my Pixel 3a; they're my bedside cans right now mostly due to build quality (and just build style, they're designed to be thrown about).

In general, Beyer's different models are targeted toward specific use cases. Lower impedance for mobile monitoring, i.e. audio recorders, mid impedance for most modern interfaces and mixing boards, and the 600Ohm units for legacy studio equipment. Not so much one better than the other really.


And really the biggest question to answer is 'open' or 'closed', followed by immersion versus competition. With gaming, the qualities of audio reproduction that are useful for competition are just about the opposite of what most people want for music, movies, and a theatrical gaming experience.

Basic example: too much bass will drown out detail. Better headphones will suffer this less, but in this case better means stuff that ranges from 3x to 10x+ of what the DT770 goes for.

Then, too much treble can be ear-splitting and fatiguing. Games are rarely super-detailed, in terms of the details in individual sound samples, that headphones that emphasize treble provide more advantage than discomfort.


Last... actual comfort. Overall weight and weight distribution are big factors here. Quality of the materials that come into contact with your head is another. I'll say that both my DT880 and Sennheiser HD600 are extremely comfortable. Sennheiser wins in comfort, really, regardless of how much or little you spend. Beyer just makes headphones designed to take abuse better, with a tank-like build but without the tank-like weight!
 

MaZa

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DT770 were my number one gaming headphones until I received my Takstar GM200, which IMHO are superior all around. You may be aware of Cooler Master MH751 gaming headset. Takstar makes them but their own version (both the Pro82 studio model as well as GM200 headset model) are superior to the Cooler Master version. These 60e have no right to sound this good, for both gaming and music and this is coming from a person who's number one music cans are Hifiman He500 planars... 😅

But digress, you will not go wrong if you get the DT770. Just make sure you get the 32 ohm version if you do not have a headphone amp. Their soundstage is good for a closed headphone, bass is strong and reaches really deep down to 20hz without any roll off and yet there is no boomy bloat to be found. It is good quality bass, even if it is clearly elevated from neutral. Treble is sparkly and has nice sense of detail, but can be fatiguing to some. Their only real weakness is that midrange is recessed, they have a clear V shape thing going on. This is why I consider my new Takstars superior because they offer pretty much everything what DT770 has but midrange is not as recessed, and are cheaper to boot.

*Edit For what its worth, my DT770 is the 250 ohm one. But there should not be massive difference between different impedance models, the basic sound signature is the same. The only odd man out would be DT770M which has even higher isolation and is made for drummers.
 
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trick0502

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I got the 80 ohm ones in today. I only had a chance to use them on my b450 mb. Something popped up about the high ohms of the headphones. I set it to its highest level and they weren’t really that loud. I will try them tonight in my x470 mb. Although I think the both have the same audio setup.

so what’s a good amp?
 

IdiotInCharge

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so what’s a good amp?
Schiit Magni takes the cake currently, I believe. Of course a pure headphone amp depends on having a decent DAC stage, which would be the line out (not headphone out) of your motherboard.

If you want an integrated headphone amp / DAC / mic input, the Schiit Hel is quite good. Of course you could get a real audio interface for that money, you know, whenever those come back in stock!

[I have my eye on the MOTU M2 right now, which should be able to power any cans I'm using with ease, and should work well with your DT770]

Although I think the both have the same audio setup.
This may be true, but it's not something you're likely to be able to discern from spec sheets published by ASUS. If your B450 board is having trouble with 80Ohm DT770s... well, that's just weak.
 

Gamerdad

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I have both the DT770 pro 80 ohm and Sennheiser HD599 (open back) and I prefer the Sennheisers for gaming and the DT770 for music. The only drawback is that your teammates can sorta hear the game sounds over the mic if you crank it up too loud with open back headphones. I'm not an audiophile, but I can hear the footsteps and coms better on the open backs and the explosions and game sounds aren't as "boomy" which is easy on my ears. I'm using an EVGA NU Audio Pro soundcard that has a built in headphone amp.

Edit: I wanted to add that I have no problems using the 80 ohm DT770 pro w/o an amp on my 3-4 year old Dell 7559 laptop or iPhone SE (2016). I don't even have to crank it to max volume on either.
 
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tungt88

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DT770 were my number one gaming headphones until I received my Takstar GM200, which IMHO are superior all around. You may be aware of Cooler Master MH751 gaming headset. Takstar makes them but their own version (both the Pro82 studio model as well as GM200 headset model) are superior to the Cooler Master version. These 60e have no right to sound this good, for both gaming and music and this is coming from a person who's number one music cans are Hifiman He500 planars... 😅

But digress, you will not go wrong if you get the DT770. Just make sure you get the 32 ohm version if you do not have a headphone amp. Their soundstage is good for a closed headphone, bass is strong and reaches really deep down to 20hz without any roll off and yet there is no boomy bloat to be found. It is good quality bass, even if it is clearly elevated from neutral. Treble is sparkly and has nice sense of detail, but can be fatiguing to some. Their only real weakness is that midrange is recessed, they have a clear V shape thing going on. This is why I consider my new Takstars superior because they offer pretty much everything what DT770 has but midrange is not as recessed, and are cheaper to boot.

*Edit For what its worth, my DT770 is the 250 ohm one. But there should not be massive difference between different impedance models, the basic sound signature is the same. The only odd man out would be DT770M which has even higher isolation and is made for drummers.

I've heard good things about the Takstar GM200, but is it good enough to warrant a purchase if I already have the MH751? I've read BenF's review on Head-Fi & the GM200 thread there as well, but am still not sure.
 

MaZa

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I've heard good things about the Takstar GM200, but is it good enough to warrant a purchase if I already have the MH751? I've read BenF's review on Head-Fi & the GM200 thread there as well, but am still not sure.

Personally I do not think so. GM200 may be superior design but if you already have MH751 then unless you want a spare or add to your collection then I do not really see the point.
 

tungt88

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Personally I do not think so. GM200 may be superior design but if you already have MH751 then unless you want a spare or add to your collection then I do not really see the point.

Thanks -- the money saved will go into my Audeze LCD-GX purchasing fund, then ;)
 
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