Corsair Strafe Cherry MX Silent - Good keyboard?

Discussion in 'Mice and Keyboards' started by Flogger23m, Dec 5, 2017 at 9:26 PM.

  1. Flogger23m

    Flogger23m [H]ardForum Junkie

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    Picked up a Corsair Strafe with Cherry MX Silent keys. Didn't open it up yet (impulse buy). Are these keyboards of good build quality? Was looking to pick up something a little quieter than my Cooler Master CM Storm with MX Browns. I don't have any problems with my Cooler Master and actually like it a good bit.

    I would plan on using this for both gaming and general use.

    This is the model I purchased:
    http://www.corsair.com/en-us/strafe-mechanical-gaming-keyboard-cherry-mx-silent-na

    Before I open this, are there any other Cherry MX silent keyboards around $70-80 that may be cheaper or of better quality? And complaints about these switches?
     
  2. Comixbooks

    Comixbooks Ignore Me

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    I think it's the same as any Corsair mechanical but I do think it doesn't have that aircraft grade aluminium it's plastic instead but I haven't seen a review on one so I could be wrong.
     
  3. Flogger23m

    Flogger23m [H]ardForum Junkie

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    Any reason that would be a negative point? Opened it and it is plastic but I don't think I'd mind that, even my current one is that. Just wondering how the build quality is. I had a Razer Blackwidow that died in about 2 months (last Razer anything I bought). Just hoping the Corsair isn't that bad.
     
  4. DrezKill

    DrezKill Limp Gawd

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    My brother and a friend both have first-gen K70s with Cherry MX Reds that are still working fine today (I forget how long it's been, but it's been at least a few years since they got them, probably longer). I know those first-gen ones with blue blacklighting had LEDs that would fail relatively quickly, but my friend and my bro have red backlighting. My K70 RGB with MX Reds I've had for almost 2 years with no issues so far. I've been pleased with the fit, finish, keycaps, media controls, weight/heft, wrist-rest, the cord, and the aluminum faceplate. The CUE software is shit, but eh at least I can use it to control the backlighting with no issues. Early firmware for the keyboard was kinda buggy but it's been fixed with updates (at least for me). Don't take my word for it, but I don't recall people really having issues with Corsair mechanical keyboards crapping out. One of my clients has had a K70 LUX for over a year and no problems with that one either (at least not after I updated the firmware on it). So yeah hopefully your keyboard (and mine) will work fine for years to come.
     
  5. Commander Shepard

    Commander Shepard Proud Brony

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    I don't like any keyboards that rely on software to control lighting, effects, etc. I had a Corsair K65 RGB RapidFire for about nine months before selling it. The keyboard itself was fine, but the Corsair utility was wretched. I constantly had to reprogram the keyboard and/or restart my PC to get the lighting to work. One more thing on Corsair boards - the front row of keys are not standard sized, so if you plan to replace the keycaps you won't be able to change the front row.

    I prefer Ducky and Deck mech boards because you control the lighting, effects, and even macros directly from the keyboard itself.
     
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  6. Findecanor

    Findecanor [H]Lite

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    I wouldn't recommend a keyboard with monochromatic backlight (red, green or blue). Choose RGB where you can set the colour yourself, white backlighting or no backlight at all: it would be easier on the eyes.

    Most mechanical keyboards have the switches mounted in a metal plate - of "aircraft grade" aluminium or of steel.
    The difference is that some keyboards have plastic on top of that where as others leave the metal plate exposed.

    The more exposed the switches are, also often the louder the keyboard is. But that varies a lot. Making a really silent keyboard is an art in and of itself. There are many factors - not just damping with O-rings or "silent" switches.