Cooler Master MasterLiquid Pro 280 Review

Discussion in 'Overclocking & Cooling' started by HardOCP News, Nov 29, 2016.

  1. HardOCP News

    HardOCP News [H] News

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    The crew at Overclockers Club have published a review of the Cooler Master MasterLiquid Pro 280 all-in-one CPU cooler today. With a long list of pros and very few cons, it sure seems as though the crew really liked this cooler. Here's a quote from the full review:

    Cooler Master listened to customer feedback and incorporated some attractive braided sheathing to the cooling lines (and pump power cable). The MasterFan Pro 140 Air Balance fans can really move the air and they do so without sounding like a jet engine. Plus you get the ability to select three different speed ranges. How many fans out there can do that? So when you consider all of these features, I would agree that the FlowOp Technology does give this cooler an edge over other similarly priced units. I also have to mention that I liked the clear hardware organizing tray in the hardware kit. Installation was also a breeze.
     
  2. Sipster

    Sipster Gawd

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  3. thesmokingman

    thesmokingman [H]ardness Supreme

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    From that amazon link, great deal! But I think 34.50 for shipping is a bit steep.
     
  4. doyll

    doyll Kyle's Thermocouple is HOT

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    6th paragraph, last sentence in 'Closer Look' reads " The contact patch where the fin is brazed to the tube ..." I may not be the brightest light on my block, but I'm bright enough to know you cannot braze to aluminum, and according to specifications the radiator is aluminum. If OC expects their reviews to have any credabilty, the reviewers need to do their homework a little better so they are not us this kind of bad carp. :wtf:
     
  5. Eldata

    Eldata Limp Gawd

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    Brazing aluminum is pretty common. I brazed two pieces of aluminum together over the weekend using propane torch and brazing rod.
     
  6. HenryBravo

    HenryBravo Limp Gawd

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    Can you clarify your "can't braze to aluminum" statement? There are plenty of sites that seem to suggest otherwise, like this: (the non-North American term "aluminium" is used below)

    "Brazing aluminium to copper is common in the refrigeration industry where copper tubes are brazed to aluminium roll-bond panels or tubes. To join aluminium and copper using brazing technology and standard NOCOLOK® Flux, flame brazing would be applicable (as well as using a low-melting flux with a low-melting filler metal). It is very similar to brazing aluminium to aluminium, but some precautions are necessary. However, when copper is brazed to aluminium and the heating process takes too long, the copper will diffuse into the aluminium at the joints. A low melting Al-Cu alloy (Al-Cu33 eutectic temperature 548°C) is thus formatted, and this could lead to erosion by perforation. Therefore, during the brazing process, the flame should never be directly applied to the joint, because the heat should be transferred by conduction through the parts to be brazed. As soon as the filler metal begins to melt, the flame must be quickly removed."
     
  7. doyll

    doyll Kyle's Thermocouple is HOT

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    I stand corrected. :oops: Joining aluminum is low temperature brazing (I looked it up) which to me is more like soldering I was raised when brazing was done with oxy-acetylene with brazing rod melty at temps well above the melting point of aluminum.


    I have welding experience including TIG and MIG welding of aluminum, magnesium, chromium and other metals, brasing cast iron, etc, and when I think about do remember playing with low temp brazing and welding rod in some aluminum motorcycle cases.

    Soldering is below 840F
    Aluminum melts at1220F
    Brass (ie used to braze) melts at 1600-1800F
    So you can see why I questioned the 'brazing aluminum' statement even though the current definition brazing as "a group of joining processes that produce coalescence of materials by heating them to the brazing temperature and by using a filler metal (solder) having a liquidus above 840°F"

    Please notice the underlined part of above quote. It seems thatn now brazing is soldering. :confused:

    Anyway I was wrong in my statement. I appologize.


    Too bad you can't buy the alphacool OEM AIOs like be quiet! Silent Loop and Fractal Design Kelvin with copper radiators, threaded fittings, etc. I'm using a Silent Loop 280 on one of my systems now. I've used others before and never liked them, but these Alphacool are very nice .. good cooling ability and quiet too. Not as good as Swiftech or EKWB Prediator AIOs, but much much better than CLCs. ;)
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2016
  8. Incontentia Buttocks

    Incontentia Buttocks [H]Lite

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    What's missing (big time) is the ambient room air temp "we see roughly 26 °C across the radiator surface and this is close to ambient".

    Close? WTF.

    And the OC results blow. I have Reeven Justice on a 6700K running at 4.6GHz on all cores (stock V) that hits 72C running the same Prime95 small FFT test at 24C ambient.

    You're expecting me to believe this water cooler is worth the money for a 1 C delta? *Cough*.

    The 4770K nominal TDP is 84w vs the 6700K nominal TDP of 91 (both at stock speeds, my 6700K maxes around 100-103w OC running Prime).

    Water appears to be necessary only if you're running a rig without headphones or have an OCD silence fetish (and good luck with that on your GPU of choice).
     
  9. doyll

    doyll Kyle's Thermocouple is HOT

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    Like I said. :p Talking heads babbling on about CPU temp with no accurate baseline air temp reference .. so what does the CPU temp comparison then mean?

    But then where is your '24c ambient' measureed?
    If it's cooler intake air ambient we can use your temps and know the cooler delta on your CPU is 48c.
    If it's room ambient we have no way of knowing how well cooler is performing. We only know your system (cooler and case) are giving you a delta of 48c .. but is the air inside of your case going into cooler 2c above room ambient .. or is it 12c above room ambient .. or maybe even 20c above room ambient.

    And that is why I always use and record cooler intake air temp at same time I record CPU temp. ;)