Consequences of not installing Intel TXE driver

Discussion in 'Networking & Security' started by Oubadah, Jul 7, 2018.

  1. Oubadah

    Oubadah [H]ard|Gawd

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    Recently purchased an an Intel NUC (NUC6CAYH), and so far it's been a miserable experience. One of the main issues is the Intel PTT EK Recertification Service hammering the CPU all the freaking time.

    One way to stop this is to not install the Intel Trusted Execution Engine (TXE) Driver. Aside from leaving an ugly bang in Device Manager, what are the consequences of doing this? Intel says the driver is required for Secure Boot and other things, but doesn't give detail.

    Disabling Trusted Execution Technology in the BIOS means that TPM functionality is disabled. I'd rather have that available, as I need to encrypt this device with Bitlocker. However, at this point I'm sorely tempted to disable Trusted Execution Technology altogether and run TPM-less Bitlocker because I don't have time for this shit. The TPM's anti-hammering mechanism seems to be its main advantage, and is that really all that critical if you're using strong password?
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2018
  2. Oubadah

    Oubadah [H]ard|Gawd

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    I disabled Trusted Execution Technology in the BIOS and it STILL wanted the bloody driver, but the driver doesn't cause the problem with it disabled so whatever. Intel needs to get their shit together, this is a recurring issue with the Intel PTT EK Recertification Service acting like a virus.
     
  3. SvenBent

    SvenBent 2[H]4U

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    When you cant make new product work faster. make the old one work slower... ;)