Connecting switch to switch?

Discussion in 'Networking & Security' started by Carlosinfl, Jun 23, 2004.

  1. Carlosinfl

    Carlosinfl Loves the juice

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    Adding another switch in my network? What isthe proper way to do so?

    I have:

    cable modem ---- smoothwall firewall ---- cisco router ---- linksys switch ----- linksys switch --- PC's

    when connecting 2 switches via cat5 cable, do I just plug the cable connecting the 2 in any RJ-45 hookup on both sides or does it matter? Can it be just any old regualr cat5 or 6 cable?

    Thanks for any info.
     
  2. jpopa

    jpopa Limp Gawd

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    well you need to use a crossover, or use the uplink port on one of the switches
     
  3. Carlosinfl

    Carlosinfl Loves the juice

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    crossover is different from cat5 or cat6? sorry for the dumb question
     
  4. Xipher

    Xipher 2[H]4U

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    Some switchs now have auto MDI/MDI-X. If yours is one of them, just use any kind of cable, and it will auto determine what it needs to do. If yours isn't like this, then just use a crossover.
     
  5. jpopa

    jpopa Limp Gawd

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    no it's cool.

    a crossover cable has pairs within the cable itself rolled. go to bestbuy and as for one, they should be able to help

    and uplink port might also be labeled as MDI/MDI-X
     
  6. tim_m

    tim_m i'm so nice

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    the cable itself is the same, just the wiring on one of the ends has the send/receive wires reversed.

    most switches have an uplink port. you connect the uplink of one to a regular port on the other with a normal cable. it doesn't matter which switch uses the uplink. if there's no uplink, then you need a crossover cable. also, some switches that have an uplink port may have that port linked with a regular port next to it, that is, you can only use either the uplink or the regular port at one time, not both at the same time.
     
  7. Carlosinfl

    Carlosinfl Loves the juice

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    ok, this is my switch

    [​IMG]

    I dont see any uplink ports, they are just labeled 1-16.

    So I can NOT use a cat5 cable to bridge this switch to another identical one? I need a patch cable?
     
  8. tim_m

    tim_m i'm so nice

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    you'll have to read the specs to see if that has that auto sensing/switching dealie (or just try it :p) but you'll probably need a crossover cable (or a pigtail adaptor, basically it plugs into a regular ethernet cable and switches the send/receive and then makes it a crossover, i've never actually seen one nor do i know where to get them, i've only heard of them).

    ...
    http://www.linksys.com/products/product.asp?grid=35&scid=39&prid=472
    it should work no matter what, that is, a regular cable should be just fine
     
  9. Carlosinfl

    Carlosinfl Loves the juice

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    so I guess I can just try one cat 5 cable to both ends and if that does not work, then just get a patch cable... :D
     
  10. tim_m

    tim_m i'm so nice

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    also, i don't think there's a technical difference (though i could be wrong) but a patch cable is no different from normal ethernet cable. i believe the term is generally used to signify a relatively short cable, often one that goes from a patch panel to a switch/hub or a computer to a plug in the wall.
     
  11. Carlosinfl

    Carlosinfl Loves the juice

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    isn't normal ethernet cable = cat5 cable.? so then how is cat5 and patch cable different.
     
  12. DVAmon

    DVAmon 2[H]4U

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    A patch cord is a standard Cat(X) cable generally used for patch runs from switch to switch, router to router, or devices locations 10m or less in distance. It can be either straight through or crossover.

    Auto MDI/MDI-X basically means you can use a crossover or a straight through and it will automatically detect what kind of cable it is and be able to send data. Usually like devices will need to be cabled with a crossover cable, whereas unlike devices are connected with a straight through. For your switch you can use whatever you have handy as long as it has an RJ-45 on the end of it and is working. =)

    Hope that helps.

    -DVA