Cable Internet Question

ScretHate

[H]ard|Gawd
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Jun 5, 2001
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I'm considering getting cable internet through Comcast. However, my house is 21 years old, and the previous owners did some real ghetto modding with splitters and whatnot. Would there be any way that I could test the signal levels before I lock myself down to a year long contract? I don't want to get stuck with poor speeds, sync loss, and etc.

Thanks
 

Liger88

2[H]4U
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Feb 14, 2012
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I'd get Comcast to come out and inspect the setup and do that themselves during the install. These days the fee is usually waived for the installation, but it used to be between $100-$250 back in the day. Don't sign up for anything until they themselves inspect the wiring. Just fill them in on the situation and why you feel it's necessary. IMO this is outside the end-users scope.
 

Schro

Supreme [H]ardness
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Depending on competition in the area, kabletown usually has packages available that do not require a contract (i.e. most of their "intro" stuff is just to limit the term of the reasonable price and not to limit you to a contract). Installation is supposed to include wiring to the jack where you want the internet, so if existing wiring isn't good enough, they should install a fresh home run from the outside, bypassing all the modding that's going on in the house.
 

ScretHate

[H]ard|Gawd
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This may be a stupid question but here goes: I already have Comcast cable TV and it works reasonably well; sometimes On Demand stuff gets choppy. If I were to purchase a cable modem and plug it in, would I be able to get a signal stat readout from its web interface, even though I don't currently have cable internet service activated?
 

FnordMan

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Have to have service first.

You'll have to have a Comcast rep out to look at things. However: Splitters are generally death to cable modems, chances are rather good that you're going to have a clean line run to wherever you want the cable modem.
 

tonyyy

Limp Gawd
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Nov 10, 2009
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just have comcast run a dedicated line to where you want it drop.

or just run it yourself
 

ScretHate

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I've decided to gut the cable and replace it with brand new quad shielded RG6/7. We only have two TVs here so it shouldn't be a problem.

I'm looking at using the splitter linked below on the main cable line, and connect the cable modem to the output that is only -3.5dB.

http://www.amazon.com/Extreme-Unbal...565751&sr=8-2&keywords=3+way+coaxial+splitter

If the main line to the house is good, then this should work fine, right?
 
Last edited:

+Eric

Limp Gawd
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Jul 4, 2012
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Run two lines down from the TV to a central spot using the shortest cable needed. You can put a third line in for your cable modem to where ever you want it to be. Make sure this central spot is where the incoming line is or can at least reach.

Use RG6 and use the Antronix VRA900. Make certain you cap off unused ports with something like this. Make your runs as short as you can. I say buy quality RG6 with ends applied, buying some junky tool to try and do it yourself is a bad move unless you really understand what you're doing and have a good tool. Or worse, those damn screw on connectors.

Then have comcast come out and check your levels and install cable modem. If there are issues, you can be reasonably sure it's with the line coming into your house, or going to the pole. The comcast guy will probably help you with that and can surely tell you if the problem is inside or not. I don't like using those standard splitters because of the loss introduced when using them.

If you really wanna get crafty and there is power near your splitter (which is ideal since it's a powered splitter), you can put the cable modem right by it and run ethernet to your router wherever it is in the house. That way you can run a short rg6 cable (3ft or something) from the splitter to the modem.
 

yuzuki

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Apr 3, 2009
Messages
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Eric was right in that you should use Antronix splitters, however the way you should actually have it set up is you should have your main cable line from the street go into a 2 way antronix splitter. 1 leg from the 2 way Antronix splitter goes to the cable modem directly and the other leg can go to another 3 way Antronix splitter for tv (or a splitter that supports the number of tvs you want). I recommend not getting to big of a splitter due to signal loss as each time you split the signal you get some loss. If the loss is to great on the cable modem side the modem will drop or fail to connect. This is why the cable modem is always done on the first split using only a 2 way splitter. Oh and when terminating the cables make sure to use some good quality compression fittings and a compression tool.
 

+Eric

Limp Gawd
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Jul 4, 2012
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The powered Antronix splitter has no loss. I'd agree with you if we're talking about non-powered splitters because of the loss they introduce.

I have no signal problems running my cable modem and the rest the house on the one splitter.
 

yuzuki

n00b
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Apr 3, 2009
Messages
29
Fair enough, I did not see the powered amp has no loss. Honestly never used a amp on the modem side, only catv side.
 
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