Best way to clean your high-end screens

FOSS-I

Weaksauce
Joined
May 8, 2020
Messages
93
I turn off the screen. I spray a solution of 50% food grade white vinegar (5% acetic acid) and 50% distilled water onto a soft microfiber cloth, and I gently damp the screen with this, and wipe dry.

Is this an ideal long-term technique for weekly cleaning without doing any damage either to a sensitive coating or to the pixels?

One monitor I returned I noticed a dead pixel right in the middle after cleaning it like this, but it didn't make sense to me how I could cause it because the damp vinegar mixture wouldn't be able to penetrate the screen and I wasn't applying much pressure.

How do you clean yours?

The 50-50 vinegar solution (actually more like 25 of the vinegar and 75 of the distilled water just because I customized it to be more mild) is what I use on my eyeglasses with good results. Most eyeglass solutions contain detergents and I think the vinegar-water solution is somewhat better.
 

ZeqOBpf6

Gawd
Joined
Aug 24, 2014
Messages
620
A good microfiber towel (emphasis on good) will clean pretty much anything to a smudge free level with just a few drops of tap water.

They're incredible. It's all I use on my monitor. And ky car windows. And the windows in my house. And my glasses.
 

fist003

n00b
Joined
Mar 29, 2020
Messages
12
i use a brush to remove heavy dust, micro fiber for fine dusts. if stubborn stains, i would use water, no other chemicals used
 

Comixbooks

Ignore Me
Joined
Jun 7, 2008
Messages
15,327
I make my own solution of 50 percent rubbing alcohol but I dilute it with water even further just to be safe. I pick up a bottle for like 1.00 in Dept 40 pharmacy at Walmart. Then use microfiber cloth which I'll wash out every year or so in a sink.
 

FOSS-I

Weaksauce
Joined
May 8, 2020
Messages
93
I read: "The screen layers are permeable by water and other liquids, especially solvent based cleaners."

Is this really true?

They then say, "As water is much much slower to impregnate, it is safe to use for cleaning if the water is removed quickly."
 

FOSS-I

Weaksauce
Joined
May 8, 2020
Messages
93
I read: "The screen layers are permeable by water and other liquids, especially solvent based cleaners."

Is this really true?

They then say, "As water is much much slower to impregnate, it is safe to use for cleaning if the water is removed quickly."
Well, I don't personally believe water or any liquid will penetrate the outer screen layer of any unit. If I'm wrong, I'd love to be shown otherwise.

I did get some liquid into one of my screens when I had the unit off and sprayed right on the screen, allowing some liquid to get under on the side. However even that didn't damage any pixels and is not visible in most actual use cases, suggesting the actual pixels are protected beneath that secondary outer layer.
 

AIM9x

Weaksauce
Joined
Feb 8, 2011
Messages
91
I generally use water + a nice microfiber towel. If it's just spot cleaning, I might use some TP instead. I have never used cleaning solutions for fear of ruining any anti-glare coating.
 
Joined
May 20, 2016
Messages
711
If water could penetrate the screen wouldn't this happen all the time in a humid climate. Hell wouldn't the opposite happen in a dry environment, water would pool out of the screen?
 

cybereality

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Mar 22, 2008
Messages
5,902
I usually just use a microfiber cloth.

If there is a lot of dust I use disposable lens cleaners, this seems to work well.
 
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