ATX12V v2.0 compatible for new ryzen system?

Mchart

Supreme [H]ardness
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Aug 7, 2004
Messages
4,259
It'll work, but with the age of it it's likely not capable of pushing the original rated wattage anymore. You are risking your entire build running a 14 year old PSU.
 

GiGaBiTe

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Apr 26, 2013
Messages
1,437
Antec PSUs of that vintage had hideous problems due to using shitty capacitors, as well as design faults that cause the PSU to run hotter than the surface of the sun internally. It was also designed in an era where more demand was placed on the 5v rail, which is why both the 3.3v and 5v rails on that PSU are "stronger" than the 12v rail.

I would not recommend using that PSU on anything you care about.
 

E4g1e

Supreme [H]ardness
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May 21, 2002
Messages
7,253
https://www.newegg.com/antec-earthwatts-ea380-380w-continuous-power/p/N82E16817371005

I have this old psu in my old amd athlon64.
standard 24pin connector.

can I still reuse this for a cheapo $250 zen3 R3 apu system?

planning to build a b550 + R3 5000g
Like the other replies stated, you are risking your system to a low-wattage 14-year-old PSU that cannot realistically handle even 300W any more. What's more, with almost everything using the +12V rail these days, that "380W" PSU would end up realistically being only a 250W PSU at best.

And newer motherboards absolutely require the EPS+12V connector to be occupied. Otherwise, your planned build will not run properly or even power up at all. However, the PSUs of that era typically have an ATX+12V 4-pin plug in addition to the 24-pin main ATX plug. This was in an era when the top desktop CPU was still some form of Intel's Pentium 4 which required that extra 4-pin CPU connector to function. That plug is compatible with the EPS+12V 8-pin socket of today, although you may not take full advantage of the overclocking features of the newer boards.

That original Earthwatts 380W was an old Seasonic-based design (manufactured to Antec's design specifications with some lesser-grade components), by the way. Later versions were made by Delta Electronics, and then FSP.
 
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