Artificial Muscles Robotic Arm

Red Falcon

[H]F Junkie
Joined
May 7, 2007
Messages
11,588



Do you even lift?

That video, and arm, are absolutely amazing, great find.

Screenshot.png


I recognized the "muscles" of it right away, and knew that I had seen them before... from Black Magic M-66 (1987):

black_magic_3_34.jpg


I'll be damned if the 1980s and 1990s didn't fully predict our dark cyberpunk future, but those decades certainly were the most accurate for what the 2020s and beyond would be like. :borg:
 

Comixbooks

Fully [H]
Joined
Jun 7, 2008
Messages
18,980
Yeah Masamune Shirow did that with all his Mecha drawings he still draws today but its all digital which isn't as good as his Appleseed and Black Magic days some of its ok.
 
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Nafensoriel

Limp Gawd
Joined
Nov 23, 2015
Messages
382
The 80s SciFi didn't predict electro muscle.
The 1890s did. War of the Worlds in fact. 1898
Even BattleTech did this in the 70s with concept art.

Relevant excerpt from the book "War of the Worlds" for those interested:
And not only did the Martians either not know of (which is incredible), or abstain from, the wheel, but in their apparatus singularly little use is made of the fixed pivot or relatively fixed pivot, with circular motions thereabout confined to one plane. Almost all the joints of the machinery present a complicated system of sliding parts moving over small but beautifully curved friction bearings. And while upon this matter of detail, it is remarkable that the long leverages of their machines are in most cases actuated by a sort of sham musculature of the disks in an elastic sheath; these disks become polarised and drawn closely and powerfully together when traversed by a current of electricity. In this way the curious parallelism to animal motions, which was so striking and disturbing to the human beholder, was attained.

It will absolutely blow your mind what we KNEW was possible 100 years ago but are just now able to prototype today.
Never think Old people can't dream folks.
 

Krenum

Fully [H]
Joined
Apr 29, 2005
Messages
18,806
The 80s SciFi didn't predict electro muscle.
The 1890s did. War of the Worlds in fact. 1898
Even BattleTech did this in the 70s with concept art.

Relevant excerpt from the book "War of the Worlds" for those interested:
And not only did the Martians either not know of (which is incredible), or abstain from, the wheel, but in their apparatus singularly little use is made of the fixed pivot or relatively fixed pivot, with circular motions thereabout confined to one plane. Almost all the joints of the machinery present a complicated system of sliding parts moving over small but beautifully curved friction bearings. And while upon this matter of detail, it is remarkable that the long leverages of their machines are in most cases actuated by a sort of sham musculature of the disks in an elastic sheath; these disks become polarised and drawn closely and powerfully together when traversed by a current of electricity. In this way the curious parallelism to animal motions, which was so striking and disturbing to the human beholder, was attained.


It will absolutely blow your mind what we KNEW was possible 100 years ago but are just now able to prototype today.
Never think Old people can't dream folks.
War of the Worlds is great! H.G. Wells actually got in trouble for his radio broadcast of it, it was so realistic that people actually thought Martians were invading. One farmer shot up his water tower because he thought it was a Martian invader.

I think its all about having the materials to build your idea, imagine what they could have accomplished 100 years ago with the materials we have today. I'd imagine in a hundred more years they'd say the same thing of today. (if we make it that long)
 

Nafensoriel

Limp Gawd
Joined
Nov 23, 2015
Messages
382
War of the Worlds is great! H.G. Wells actually got in trouble for his radio broadcast of it, it was so realistic that people actually thought Martians were invading. One farmer shot up his water tower because he thought it was a Martian invader.

I think its all about having the materials to build your idea, imagine what they could have accomplished 100 years ago with the materials we have today. I'd imagine in a hundred more years they'd say the same thing of today. (if we make it that long)
Oh, we'll make it. Modern education does a very poor job of explaining just how robust a biosphere is. That and everyone and their brother misquotes or misreads the IPCC reports.
Most science comes in two flavors... theoretical or practical.
Typically theoretical scientists are 50 to 100 years before practical scientists are able to actually perform meaningful experiments. There is actually a very real correlation between sci-fi and future tech. Generally, those who write sci-fi(especially hard sci-fi) tend to get obsessive about technology trends and their imaginations allow for a very realistic future snapshot of how those trends will evolve.

I just honestly wanted to remind people that those who came before us were not stupid. Limited by their times yes but definitely not stupid. We are still learning things we have forgotten as a people from studying history.
 
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