Arctic Liquid Freezer II rev3

Jinto

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There is now a rev3 for 240 and 280 (and possibly 120). Changes seem to be the installation only: https://support.arctic.ac/index.php?p=lf2-240r3

I bought a 280 recently and got the rev3. The new AM4 mounting system allows for shifting the mounting for Zen2/3 but is not compatible with boards with tight socket clearance (I have a Asrock B550 Gaming ITX). The 280 v3 is so new there are no manuals for it. Seems like the only solution is to request for the rev2 mounting screws.
 

Spartacus09

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They went from 0 stock on the AFII 360mm for the past 2 months or so to now having stock, I'd bet the 360 also is a rev3 to have documents released soon.
 
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bpizzle1

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The one I bought about a month ago is still revision 2. Rev 3 must be super, super new. I wonder if the mounting changes are the ones the mentioned they were working on to GN in response to GN saying they felt it was a little awkward to mount compared to others.
 

TheSlySyl

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There is now a rev3 for 240 and 280 (and possibly 120). Changes seem to be the installation only: https://support.arctic.ac/index.php?p=lf2-240r3

I bought a 280 recently and got the rev3. The new AM4 mounting system allows for shifting the mounting for Zen2/3 but is not compatible with boards with tight socket clearance (I have a Asrock B550 Gaming ITX). The 280 v3 is so new there are no manuals for it. Seems like the only solution is to request for the rev2 mounting screws.
They're also releasing a 420mm variant. I'm guessing it'll all be Rev. 3.

I also think its REALLY funny how they just straight up directly link to a GN video at the top of their FAQ.

Edit: 420mm is out!
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B08HLPFXWM
 
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FlawleZ

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I upgraded to the 240mm rev2 from an H100i and my temps dropped 10C on load on my 3800X. It's simply the best AIO for the money, possibly period.
 

bpizzle1

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Since I’m still waiting on my cpu, I emailed Arctic and asked if I could have the rev3 mounting hardware for my rev2 AIO. They said they were getting some in the next few days and would send me some for free. Worth hitting them up if you want the new clips. They are supposedly much easier to install with since it’s using standoffs now.
 

Jinto

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It says Rev 2 everywhere.

Maybe they just called it rev2 for the 420. But the mount is identical to the rev3 mount on the other coolers. The older rev used long screws to screw into the backplate instead of using the offset system.
 

Nenu

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Maybe they just called it rev2 for the 420. But the mount is identical to the rev3 mount on the other coolers. The older rev used long screws to screw into the backplate instead of using the offset system.
I misinterpreted what you said, I thought you meant it should be a Liquid Freezer III.
Its a Freezer II but there is no information anywhere to say the revision.
So you must be right :)
My bad.
 

Needle

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There is now a rev3 for 240 and 280 (and possibly 120). Changes seem to be the installation only: https://support.arctic.ac/index.php?p=lf2-240r3

I bought a 280 recently and got the rev3. The new AM4 mounting system allows for shifting the mounting for Zen2/3 but is not compatible with boards with tight socket clearance (I have a Asrock B550 Gaming ITX). The 280 v3 is so new there are no manuals for it. Seems like the only solution is to request for the rev2 mounting screws.
Hi Jinto
Did you manage to mount it on your B550 Gaming ITX? I faced the same issue today with a Gigabyte Aorus B550 Pro V2. The "mounting clips" doesn't fit. The lower one is blocked by one of the M.2 slots and the top one is blocked by some capacitors to the left of the CPU...
Seems like Arctic pushed them selves away from compatibility with a lot of B550 boards by changing to rev 3.
 

Jinto

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Hi Jinto
Did you manage to mount it on your B550 Gaming ITX? I faced the same issue today with a Gigabyte Aorus B550 Pro V2. The "mounting clips" doesn't fit. The lower one is blocked by one of the M.2 slots and the top one is blocked by some capacitors to the left of the CPU...
Seems like Arctic pushed them selves away from compatibility with a lot of B550 boards by changing to rev 3.

You need the rev2 mounting screws. Maybe call up Arctic and see if they can send you some. I got my screws from my local distributor.
 

somebrains

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Sound like Artic needs to come up with a v4 and offer them to existing owners ala Noctua.
 

ak enemy

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I can confirm the issue with a MSI B550I Gaming Edge.
I just got a Rev3 from Amazon.de and it doesn't fit on my motherboard.

As mentioned by Needle, rev3 mounting points could interfer with your M2 port and some capacitor cover on the left of the processor.

As you can see in the first picture, M2 interference won't allow you to screw the mounting clips on the standoffs as it's not aligned.

lsyamTB.jpg c8OT17U.jpg


On the other hand, there's a clear interference with the capacitor cover around the processor....

X540q09.jpg

I don't konw why Artic decided to not supply the rev2 AM4 screws which would solve this problem on some B550 mobo.... :(
 

dimi79

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I can confirm the issue with a MSI B550I Gaming Edge.
I just got a Rev3 from Amazon.de and it doesn't fit on my motherboard.

As mentioned by Needle, rev3 mounting points could interfer with your M2 port and some capacitor cover on the left of the processor.

As you can see in the first picture, M2 interference won't allow you to screw the mounting clips on the standoffs as it's not aligned.

View attachment 308647 View attachment 308648


On the other hand, there's a clear interference with the capacitor cover around the processor....

View attachment 308649

I don't konw why Artic decided to not supply the rev2 AM4 screws which would solve this problem on some B550 mobo.... :(
This is beyond annoying. Has anyone found a solution? Is there any B500 motherboard that actually can handle this?
 

Danja

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Sorry to bump an old thread, but I think I might be having the same issue as some posters above. I did a dry run of mounting my LFII (rev 3) onto my Asus TUF Gaming X570 Pro, and I noticed a few things:
  1. The mounting rails still seem pretty loose even after screwing into the standoffs as far as I could without possibly damaging the board.
  2. One of the mounting rails rests on a capacitor and may be coming into contact with it.
  3. The other mounting rail covers a whole bank of capacitors, although there may be a tiny bit of clearance there.

I have a video of the problem here:
Is this the issue I'm having with the rev3 mounting screws, or am I just misunderstanding how to install it?
 

Jinto

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I dont think it should be so loose. That said it may still install fine as the thumb screws will be pulling on the bracket. Might as well give it a try.

Worst comes to worst you can buy 4 long screws and avoid the bracket altogether.
 

Danja

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I dont think it should be so loose. That said it may still install fine as the thumb screws will be pulling on the bracket. Might as well give it a try.

Worst comes to worst you can buy 4 long screws and avoid the bracket altogether.
Thanks for the tip, I'll give it a try. What would the setup look like with the long screws? Are you referring to the ones that stick up from the bracket? It doesn't look like there's anywhere on the board to screw them into so that they're in the right position for the thumb screws. Sorry if I'm being obtuse.
 

Jinto

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Thanks for the tip, I'll give it a try. What would the setup look like with the long screws? Are you referring to the ones that stick up from the bracket? It doesn't look like there's anywhere on the board to screw them into so that they're in the right position for the thumb screws. Sorry if I'm being obtuse.

Check out how rev2 is mounted. You need 4 long screws and maybe some washers to screw into the base plate.
 

Spartacus09

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I think you have it backwards and the wrong mounting holes possibly? It should arc inwards per the instructions pic in the above:
1610469447763.png


Edit I looked at arctics website you also might have been sent the wrong screws:
1610469708974.png
 
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Danja

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I think you have it backwards and the wrong mounting holes possibly? It should arc inwards per the instructions pic in the above:


Edit I looked at arctics website you also might have been sent the wrong screws:

Wow. I was doing this late at night, but wow. I literally was watching a YouTube video on how to install while installing and I still did it backwards. Thanks for pointing that out :D. I'm still waiting for my RAM to come in so I disassembled everything after taking my video; will try the opposite orientation today. I saw the warning about the screws as well and I thought maybe that's why I couldn't seem to screw them in all the way, because that issue I don't think will be fixed by switching the bracket orientation. But sheesh, thanks for pointing that out!
 

jthomas

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Re: wrong screws, yup I just installed one recently and the those are definitely the wrong screws included. The ones you need to use are the little bitty ones you use to screw an ssd into a drive tray, then the brackets will be nice and snug.
 

edo101

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I wanted to use this cooler but it's a CLC with only 2 year warranty. I actually have both the 280MM and 360MM in my house that I will be returning. I don't feel comfortable having something that might get worse in 5 years with evaporation. seems like I'll stick with Noctua
 

Spartacus09

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I wanted to use this cooler but it's a CLC with only 2 year warranty. I actually have both the 280MM and 360MM in my house that I will be returning. I don't feel comfortable having something that might get worse in 5 years with evaporation. seems like I'll stick with Noctua
You just described every single CLC, to each their own though.
 

Spartacus09

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But some come with longer warranties. Tho, I'd be all over an AIO that can perform just as well that I can refill
The "I don't feel comfortable having something that might get worse in 5 years with evaporation." is what I was notating towards.
You're more overly converned with evaporation than you need to be, a much more concerning or likely problem would be a pump failure (which warranty would be affected by and don't fault you for considering).

However evaporation is the least likely issue for a CLC and only a moderate concern after about 5 years if its mounted tubes up (2-3y or less if mounted on the bottom of the case).
If its mounted at the top of the case or with tubes down, I wouldn't even concern myself with evaporation for 10+ years.
 

doyll

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The "I don't feel comfortable having something that might get worse in 5 years with evaporation." is what I was notating towards.
You're more overly converned with evaporation than you need to be, a much more concerning or likely problem would be a pump failure (which warranty would be affected by and don't fault you for considering).

However evaporation is the least likely issue for a CLC and only a moderate concern after about 5 years if its mounted tubes up (2-3y or less if mounted on the bottom of the case).
If its mounted at the top of the case or with tubes down, I wouldn't even concern myself with evaporation for 10+ years.
Aren't most pump failures caused by of low coolant level?

Seems I've seen a correlation of more failures / shorter lifespan of CLCs on high heat / higher temp CPUs than low heat CPUs. Considering higher temps cause more coolant loss it makes sense that high heat applications don't last as long .. because higher heat means more coolant loss.
 

Nenu

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Does anyone know if water can be used to top this up?
It seems obvious, but just to be sure.
 

Spartacus09

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Aren't most pump failures caused by of low coolant level?

Seems I've seen a correlation of more failures / shorter lifespan of CLCs on high heat / higher temp CPUs than low heat CPUs. Considering higher temps cause more coolant loss it makes sense that high heat applications don't last as long .. because higher heat means more coolant loss.
In my opinion no overall, but maybe, I don't have that data available to say for sure.
I don't think anyone does to make a scientific analysis or if they do its the manufactures that aren't likely to release it.

For the no:
No, even the Liang DDC and similar pumps many users have in their custom loops are only rated for 50000 hours (about 5.7 years), the AIO pumps are generally about the same rating (which is why most have a 5 year warranty).
That said, thats just a MTBF so you'll hear some that run for only a few years, but many are going on 7 years, or are still running a decade+ today.

No, the temperature of your CPU does not reflect the temperature of the water in your loop so you're not boiling the water in the tubes, the water temperature generally only gets up to to about 10c above ambient before plateauing.
Again basing it off the DDC its rated for water/operating temp up to 122F (50c), which is still low enough to so unless you are running your radiators fanless with a heat load, or have severely undersized the AIO its not going to get hot enough to substantially increase the water evaporation permeation.
Even if it say doubled the water evaporation at a higher temp due to crappy tubing that permeates more, after 5 years thats still only about 10% of the water evaporated.

For the Maybe:
Maybe, having a pump run dry can cause premature failure, thats why the mounting is important to ensure any air that exists or is introduced over time doesn't make its way into the pump often or at all.
Coolant loss is estimated to be about 1%/year per Steve at Gamers Nexus (depending on the tubing type and mixture) which should not substantially affect the cooling performance if mounted correctly.

Does anyone know if water can be used to top this up?
It seems obvious, but just to be sure.
Most if not all CLC use a proprietary mixture of propylene glycol and distilled water, so theoretically if it has a fill port distilled water could be used (best to check with the manufacturer on this though).
 

doyll

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In my opinion no overall, but maybe, I don't have that data available to say for sure.
I don't think anyone does to make a scientific analysis or if they do its the manufactures that aren't likely to release it.

For the no:
No, even the Liang DDC and similar pumps many users have in their custom loops are only rated for 50000 hours (about 5.7 years), the AIO pumps are generally about the same rating (which is why most have a 5 year warranty).
That said, thats just a MTBF so you'll hear some that run for only a few years, but many are going on 7 years, or are still running a decade+ today.

No, the temperature of your CPU does not reflect the temperature of the water in your loop so you're not boiling the water in the tubes, the water temperature generally only gets up to to about 10c above ambient before plateauing.
Again basing it off the DDC its rated for water/operating temp up to 122F (50c), which is still low enough to so unless you are running your radiators fanless with a heat load, or have severely undersized the AIO its not going to get hot enough to substantially increase the water evaporation permeation.
Even if it say doubled the water evaporation at a higher temp due to crappy tubing that permeates more, after 5 years thats still only about 10% of the water evaporated.

For the Maybe:
Maybe, having a pump run dry can cause premature failure, thats why the mounting is important to ensure any air that exists or is introduced over time doesn't make its way into the pump often or at all.
Coolant loss is estimated to be about 1%/year per Steve at Gamers Nexus (depending on the tubing type and mixture) which should not substantially affect the cooling performance if mounted correctly.


Most if not all CLC use a proprietary mixture of propylene glycol and distilled water, so theoretically if it has a fill port distilled water could be used (best to check with the manufacturer on this though).
I agree with 50000 hour MTBF, but that is with pump running full of water. Replace that water with air, even air bubbles causes vibration in pump with resulting shaft/bearing and impeller / pump housing degradation .. which them results is lower flowrate, even higher temps, etc.

Yes, the temperature of CLC coolant has a direct correlation to CPU temp. Several years ago I asked every failed CLC owner I could what their temps had been and how long their CLC lasted. Resulting data showed a definite correlation between CPU temp and CLC live.

Keep in mind the flow rate of CLC pumps' 20-40L/h with a very few up to 70L/h rating, while D5' has a 1500L/h rating. Thus CLC loop flowrate is only a small faction as fast as custom loops with D5. Thus CLC coolant temp changes with CPU temp much, much more flowing up to 40L/h than in a custom loop flowing up to 1500L/h.

I've been using be quiet! Silent Loop 280 (from late 2016) with 2nd radiator (added 2018) from dead Silent Loop 360. From full system when new topped up after a couple days of use, it needs again about every 6 months (20-40cc), then flush and change after 1.4-1.6 years. Still on original pump and again due for flush and refill. I suppose I should have put a flow meter and temp sensor on it, but haven't bothered.

Indeed, we should use distilled water in CLC & AIO loops same as custom loops.

But coolant loss has little to do with pump. It's about porosity of coolant tubing and resulting coolant loss over time. Higher temp coolant means higher temp tubing means expansion and more coolant 'leaks' out through tubing, same as happens with tires loosing pressure over time. This results with more air in system , more bubbles in pump.
 

Spartacus09

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I agree with 50000 hour MTBF, but that is with pump running full of water. Replace that water with air, even air bubbles causes vibration in pump with resulting shaft/bearing and impeller / pump housing degradation .. which them results is lower flowrate, even higher temps, etc.
I agree, but as noted if mounted properly this issue is at least minimized so the risk is negligible as the air will pool at the top of the rad and won't traverse the shaft/bearing or impeller/pump housing at all.

Yes, the temperature of CLC coolant has a direct correlation to CPU temp. Several years ago I asked every failed CLC owner I could what their temps had been and how long their CLC lasted. Resulting data showed a definite correlation between CPU temp and CLC live.
*insert your sample size is bad and you should feel bad zoidburg*
I'm sure you asked a bunch of people but its no where near enough sufficient sample size to draw a conclusion.
There are too many unknown variables such as the coolant temp itself, not to mention how they had it mounted, model they used, fans used/airflow, case installed, environment, ambient temp, how long it did last, whether it was sized properly etc etc etc
Any of which can introduce other factors for increased chance of failure.

But coolant loss has little to do with pump. It's about porosity of coolant tubing and resulting coolant loss over time. Higher temp coolant means higher temp tubing means expansion and more coolant 'leaks' out through tubing, same as happens with tires loosing pressure over time. This results with more air in system , more bubbles in pump.
Agreed, but I'd bet they don't know what temp the water was in the CLC/AIO coolers and we can't determine for sure that was a substantial impact on said 'leaks' or if it was the type of tubing used in their model of AIO or some other factor.


Not bashing ya, just saying theres not enough data in my opinion to accurately draw a confirming conclusion that the pump is more likely to fail sooner with lower water levels when mounted optimally.
While I'm sure there is a reasonable assumption of higher CPU temp = higher average water temps = higher tube temps = increased evaporation which would lower the water in any setup I just cant agree for certain thats the direct cause for the pump failures.
 

doyll

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I agree, but as noted if mounted properly this issue is at least minimized so the risk is negligible as the air will pool at the top of the rad and won't traverse the shaft/bearing or impeller/pump housing at all.


*insert your sample size is bad and you should feel bad zoidburg*
I'm sure you asked a bunch of people but its no where near enough sufficient sample size to draw a conclusion.
There are too many unknown variables such as the coolant temp itself, not to mention how they had it mounted, model they used, fans used/airflow, case installed, environment, ambient temp, how long it did last, whether it was sized properly etc etc etc
Any of which can introduce other factors for increased chance of failure.
You call me Zoidurg, but what supporting data do you have to support your claim I'm wrong?

At least I have done some research in determining CLC live vs CPU heat. Have you done anything but post what you think is fact with no data at all? You sure haven't posted anything

You state:
No, the temperature of your CPU does not reflect the temperature of the water in your loop so you're not boiling the water in the tubes, the water temperature generally only gets up to to about 10c above ambient before plateauing.
Where is your supporting data? Seems you are the "Zoidburg" here more I am. At least I have done some research on which I make my claims. What have you done / have to support what you've posted?

I've also opened a bunch of died/dying CLCs to coolant and found them all to have very little in them .. but than even a full one has very little coolant. Do you have any idea how much coolant is in a CLC?

I don't have water temp, etc. data, but when the at least 30 owners of high overclock / high heat CPUs who had their CLCs start failing in less than 2 years, some in less than a year. If higher CPU temps don't cause higher coolant temps and thus shorten CLC life, how do you explain it?

Your 2nd statement sure sounds like bashing in to me.
 

freeagentt

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I used an H100 with an X5690 when they were new. I got roughly 14-16 months of the performance that made me leave my D14. After 2.5 years I was not able to run some known good overclocks. after another year I had to drop clocks because cooling capacity had diminished greatly. After 3.5-4 years I gave it to my brother to use on his 7700K. It barely ran @ stock. It all takes time. Give it time, you'll see.

Pump was loud after the first week.. was occasionally quiet, but was loud its whole life.

Edit: I ran the H100 with a minimum of two 120x38s, occasionally four.
 

doyll

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I used an H100 with an X5690 when they were new. I got roughly 14-16 months of the performance that made me leave my D14. After 2.5 years I was not able to run some known good overclocks. after another year I had to drop clocks because cooling capacity had diminished greatly. After 3.5-4 years I gave it to my brother to use on his 7700K. It barely ran @ stock. It all takes time. Give it time, you'll see.

Pump was loud after the first week.. was occasionally quiet, but was loud its whole life.

Edit: I ran the H100 with a minimum of two 120x38s, occasionally four.
X5690 is a hot one, even running stock.

What orientation was radiator mounted? Was it front, top, bottom? Bottom mounted is know to cause pump failures. Front needs top of radiator higher than CPU with hoses in/out of bottom. Best orientation is radiator in top.
 

freeagentt

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I mostly used it in the top configuration, mounted in an R4. It did spend some time front mounted in a heavily modded Antec Sonata, and again front mounted in a Stacker STC-01. I had to be creative with both installs.. but it worked very well.

Edit:

Pump was always lower than the top of the rad..
 

Spartacus09

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At least I have done some research in determining CLC live vs CPU heat. Have you done anything but post what you think is fact with no data at all? You sure haven't posted anything
Bruh, what research? Haven't seen any of your published findings other than "I asked 30 people whos pumps failed".
But whatever, here's some water delta information showing the difference in water temps https://www.overclockers.com/guide-deltat-water-cooling/
HWLabs-SR1360_HeatLoadChart-2-300x261.jpg

Physics and thermal transfer, water can't take away heat if the water temp is higher than the CPU temps which can often go into the 70-80c range (or higher).
CPU cores temps are reported by the motherboard in basically every MOBO today, based off the chart its a very limited increase in water temp considering most CPUs are about a 65-95w TDP (with some going to the 180w/240w range for threadripper and other high core cpu).
While I concede the chart is not for a CLC its a good baseline for expected difference in temperature based off heat-load in a water loop configuration.

I've also opened a bunch of died/dying CLCs to coolant and found them all to have very little in them .. but than even a full one has very little coolant. Do you have any idea how much coolant is in a CLC?
I do, Steve at Gamers Nexus opens them up and gets a estimate of the amount of liquid in many of them in his breakdown videos most CLC have about 100-200ml of fluid so even brand new thats not much liquid so 'having very little come out' is expected.
Here's his drain and teardown of a Arctic Freezer II 280 which is one of the largest with about 250-270ml of liquid (since its a thicker rad), I would expect the AFII 360 this post is based off of to have about 300ml:
I don't have water temp, etc. data, but when the at least 30 owners of high overclock / high heat CPUs who had their CLCs start failing in less than 2 years, some in less than a year. If higher CPU temps don't cause higher coolant temps and thus shorten CLC life, how do you explain it?
I'm not saying CPU temps don't cause higher coolant temps, I'm just not convinced increasing the water temp +-10c above ambient is going to increase it's evaporation speed by a significant margin.
I already listed the other factors that could play into it such as mounting method, environment, undersized rad, etc all I was saying was the pump running dry could be avoided.
My issue is not that the CPU temps didn't cause the premature failure, just that theres not enough data to say for sure thats the direct cause when there are many other variables that could accelerate the decline of the pump are unknown.
(or depending on the variable could have kept it from failing all together until its rated life even)

Your 2nd statement sure sounds like bashing in to me.
My apologies on that, I have a poor choice in timing on sarcastic comments at times.
 

doyll

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I mostly used it in the top configuration, mounted in an R4. It did spend some time front mounted in a heavily modded Antec Sonata, and again front mounted in a Stacker STC-01. I had to be creative with both installs.. but it worked very well.

Edit:

Pump was always lower than the top of the rad..
Thanks for the answers.

Sorry, but
I used an H100 with an X5690 when they were new. I got roughly 14-16 months of the performance that made me leave my D14. After 2.5 years I was not able to run some known good overclocks. after another year I had to drop clocks because cooling capacity had diminished greatly. After 3.5-4 years I gave it to my brother to use on his 7700K. It barely ran @ stock.
isn't
working very well
in my book.

Bruh, what research? Haven't seen any of your published findings other than "I asked 30 people whos pumps failed".
But whatever, here's some water delta information showing the difference in water temps https://www.overclockers.com/guide-deltat-water-cooling/
View attachment 320779

Physics and thermal transfer, water can't take away heat if the water temp is higher than the CPU temps which can often go into the 70-80c range (or higher).
CPU cores temps are reported by the motherboard in basically every MOBO today, based off the chart its a very limited increase in water temp considering most CPUs are about a 65-95w TDP (with some going to the 180w/240w range for threadripper and other high core cpu).
While I concede the chart is not for a CLC its a good baseline for expected difference in temperature based off heat-load in a water loop configuration.


I do, Steve at Gamers Nexus opens them up and gets a estimate of the amount of liquid in many of them in his breakdown videos most CLC have about 100-200ml of fluid so even brand new thats not much liquid so 'having very little come out' is expected.
Here's his drain and teardown of a Arctic Freezer II 280 which is one of the largest with about 250-270ml of liquid (since its a thicker rad), I would expect the AFII 360 this post is based off of to have about 300ml:

I'm not saying CPU temps don't cause higher coolant temps, I'm just not convinced increasing the water temp +-10c above ambient is going to increase it's evaporation speed by a significant margin.
I already listed the other factors that could play into it such as mounting method, environment, undersized rad, etc all I was saying was the pump running dry could be avoided.
My issue is not that the CPU temps didn't cause the premature failure, just that theres not enough data to say for sure thats the direct cause when there are many other variables that could accelerate the decline of the pump are unknown.
(or depending on the variable could have kept it from failing all together until its rated life even)


My apologies on that, I have a poor choice in timing on sarcastic comments at times.
Your first image will not open to a size I can read.

Your "Physics and thermal transfer, water can't take away heat if the water temp is higher than the CPU tempsr" babble is simple common sense.

OKay, so someone else has told you how little coolant is in a CLC. Sorry, I don't do video reviews. I want written ones, but that's me. Custom loops have reservoirs hold as much often more than CLCs do.

Read what freeagentt posted about his H100 cooling ability over time on hot CPU. His H100 cooling degradation was mostly loss of coolant. Numerous times people ave lower improved CLC performance by removing waterblock base and topping up coolant.

It isn't the increased coolant temps that wears pump but the loss of coolant.
Increased coolant temp means increased temps in hose and plastic which is expansion so higher molecular action thus coolant can move from inside CLC to atmosphere easier .. meaning more coolant loss with higher coolant temps .. meaning less cooling ability of CLC .. and when coolant becomes low enough for air bubbles start moving through pump we have increased pump and seal wear.

.​

Apology accepted. Very easy for posts to be misunderstood. I apologize for how I replied to you.
 
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