Adding SSD to new laptop

zavier

n00b
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Oct 7, 2006
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58
Am going to purchase a Dell 15 in. XPS laptop and I would like to add (myself) an internal SSD so I can install Ubuntu. One problem I foresee is that in order to install Ubuntu I should disconnect the existing SSD. Could I install new SSD and load Ubuntu while other laptop SSD stays connected ? I gather dual boot will work
Thanks
 

B00nie

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Nov 1, 2012
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8,461
Am going to purchase a Dell 15 in. XPS laptop and I would like to add (myself) an internal SSD so I can install Ubuntu. One problem I foresee is that in order to install Ubuntu I should disconnect the existing SSD. Could I install new SSD and load Ubuntu while other laptop SSD stays connected ? I gather dual boot will work
Thanks
Just install Ubuntu and let it repartition your harddrive. It will install a boot loader which lets you choose between OSes on each boot. Or if you just want to try it, run Ubuntu off a USB3 SSD drive.
 

zavier

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Oct 7, 2006
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Why not just dual boot from one hard drive.
I think what you (mjz-5) are implyng is to partition the laptop SSD and install Ubuntu along with Win 10 in same SSD. But the laptop has two extra PCIe slot so I can add another SSD. From what I have read here, it's best to install Ubuntu in separate SSD.
 

zavier

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Oct 7, 2006
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Just install Ubuntu and let it repartition your harddrive. It will install a boot loader which lets you choose between OSes on each boot. Or if you just want to try it, run Ubuntu off a USB3 SSD drive.
Bonnie, what u saying is forget separate SSD. Use SSD that comes with laptop
 

DeaconFrost

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I'm not a fan of dual-booting at all, especially on modern hardware. If you want to play around with Linux, virtualize it. Then, you can use both OSes at once, or should you need to reinstall Linux, it can be done quickly, with very little effort.
 

auntjemima

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I'm not a fan of dual-booting at all, especially on modern hardware. If you want to play around with Linux, virtualize it. Then, you can use both OSes at once, or should you need to reinstall Linux, it can be done quickly, with very little effort.
What difference does modern hardware have to do with it?

Anyway, dual booting is fine. There are many ways you can do it and all of them are listed above. Depending on the hard drive size you already have, I would let Linux repartition it and run both from the same SSD.

If you would rather have them on separate drives (not really needed), then go that route.

Whatever way you decide, Linux will create a boot menu allowing you to select windows or Linux on boot.
 

DeaconFrost

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If you bork one OS in a dual boot, you could easily render both unusable. Modern hardware has much better virtualization support, allowing you to run a virtualized OS at nearly native performance, which just about renders dual-booting dead.
 

zavier

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Oct 7, 2006
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Thanks guys. I like the suggestion "Just install Ubuntu and let it repartition your harddrive." but virtualization sounds a lot better. It's easy, low risk, but slow. I will install virtual box and see how slow/adequate it works. Thanks
 
Joined
Dec 1, 2011
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Thanks guys. I like the suggestion "Just install Ubuntu and let it repartition your harddrive." but virtualization sounds a lot better. It's easy, low risk, but slow. I will install virtual box and see how slow/adequate it works. Thanks
VMware Player is a far better virtualization app than VirtualBox (and also free).
 

compcons

Limp Gawd
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Jul 25, 2006
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I ran Ubuntu from an m.sata drive and Windows from an SSD. If you isntall side-by-side, a small problem with an update in Windows can cause issues and if GRUB gets messed up, casual linux users are hosed. Pick a drive from the boot menu and it is all safe and separate with no need to install a hyper visor.
 
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