Xbox series X

Domingo

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I was looking at TVs a bit yesterday. Compared to what I paid for 65”4K in 2016, “upgrading” to similar with VRR HDMI 2.1 is almost half the price. I could easily see 2.1 becoming a more common thing in households a year from now.

I just wish manufacturers would fucking pick an HDR standard and stick with it. It seems like you can get HDR10+ or Dolby Vision but not quite Both.
Same. I glanced at some of the new Samsung TV's after their announcement and they're much cheaper than they were a few years ago. They seem dead set on HDR10+ while it seems like Dolby is what they others are going with. As someone who is mostly using for gaming, I've only seem Dolby pop up a couple times. Optical disk movies seem to favor it, though.
 

Viper87227

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Same. I glanced at some of the new Samsung TV's after their announcement and they're much cheaper than they were a few years ago. They seem dead set on HDR10+ while it seems like Dolby is what they others are going with. As someone who is mostly using for gaming, I've only seem Dolby pop up a couple times. Optical disk movies seem to favor it, though.
Samsung doesn't want to pay the license for Dolby Vision, that is the only reason why they are pushing HDR10+. Everyone else is sticking with DV because it's been around for years, it's widely supported (especially on streaming platforms, which is where the average consumer gets their media these days). Also, Dolby in general is a name that most consumers know, and associate with high-quality media. DV support helps them sell TVs. Samsung thinks they are a big enough name that they don't need a Dolby logo on their box to stand out. And truthfully, they are right. Samsung makes over priced, under performing TVs. I think I'd probably label them as the worst value in TVs right now. And yet, they sell a ton, and the people who buy them think they're wonderful. Largely due to their phones, Samsung has sort of become the de facto choice for many when buying home electronics.. they are the Apple for non-Apple people.

DV has seen very little adoption in games. I think only EA games have supported it, and I'm not sure they even do anymore. I could never get DV working in EA games on my PC... maybe it works better on consoles? I never lost sleep over it... for all the praise people give to DV, I find the difference is often negligible on my LG OLED (in moves) and I've even come across a few where I think HDR10 looks better (The Last Jedi comes to mind, I've watched it off the disc with both HDR10 and DV, and preferred HDR10). At the end of the day, well done HDR looks good, and poorly done HDR does not, regardless of format. DV doesn't magically make anything superior.
 

Armenius

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Samsung doesn't want to pay the license for Dolby Vision, that is the only reason why they are pushing HDR10+. Everyone else is sticking with DV because it's been around for years, it's widely supported (especially on streaming platforms, which is where the average consumer gets their media these days). Also, Dolby in general is a name that most consumers know, and associate with high-quality media. DV support helps them sell TVs. Samsung thinks they are a big enough name that they don't need a Dolby logo on their box to stand out. And truthfully, they are right. Samsung makes over priced, under performing TVs. I think I'd probably label them as the worst value in TVs right now. And yet, they sell a ton, and the people who buy them think they're wonderful. Largely due to their phones, Samsung has sort of become the de facto choice for many when buying home electronics.. they are the Apple for non-Apple people.

DV has seen very little adoption in games. I think only EA games have supported it, and I'm not sure they even do anymore. I could never get DV working in EA games on my PC... maybe it works better on consoles? I never lost sleep over it... for all the praise people give to DV, I find the difference is often negligible on my LG OLED (in moves) and I've even come across a few where I think HDR10 looks better (The Last Jedi comes to mind, I've watched it off the disc with both HDR10 and DV, and preferred HDR10). At the end of the day, well done HDR looks good, and poorly done HDR does not, regardless of format. DV doesn't magically make anything superior.
LG's televisions are literally the only displays on the market that support Dolby Vision. HDR10+ is also a Samsung-specific format found only on Samsung televisions. HDR10 is more widely adopted, but it doesn't support dynamic metadata like the other two. HLG is royalty-free, but as far as I know there are no games that use it even though it has wide support among display makers. I actually can't think of any games that support Dolby Vision, either. I think Mass Effect: Andromeda does. Unfortunately this is a modern format war where consumers are losing out right now.

Personally, Dolby Vision looks best on my LG C8 for the media that properly supports it. Disney is shafting Dolby Vision for some reason, either directly converting HDR10 to DV or not including it at all on newer releases. For this reason, using The Last Jedi is a poor example to use when determining preferences between HDR10 and DV.
 

Viper87227

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LG's televisions are literally the only displays on the market that support Dolby Vision. HDR10+ is also a Samsung-specific format found only on Samsung televisions. HDR10 is more widely adopted, but it doesn't support dynamic metadata like the other two. HLG is royalty-free, but as far as I know there are no games that use it even though it has wide support among display makers. I actually can't think of any games that support Dolby Vision, either. I think Mass Effect: Andromeda does. Unfortunately this is a modern format war where consumers are losing out right now.

Personally, Dolby Vision looks best on my LG C8 for the media that properly supports it. Disney is shafting Dolby Vision for some reason, either directly converting HDR10 to DV or not including it at all on newer releases. For this reason, using The Last Jedi is a poor example to use when determining preferences between HDR10 and DV.
Uhhh... What? I have three TVs in my home, an LG OLED, a Vizio M-Series, and a TCL 6-Series, and they all have Dolby Vision. So does almost every other non Samsung TV these days. You're also mistaken about HDR10+. It's a collaboration between Samsung, Panasonic, and Fox. Panasonic and Hisense both have TV's out that support both HDR10+ and Dolby Vision, but neither are available in the US.

As far as DV in games goes, the only company to support it that I know of is EA. Andromedia has it, so does Battlefield 1. Anthem and Battlefield 5 may as well, I don't recall. No idea on Fallen Order either, don't have it. DV never worked right on PC anyway, no idea if it's better on consoles.

I agree that, for most cases, DV looks best. That wasn't my point. More so, my point was that the difference is not substantial. Could I notice the difference watching the same movie side-by-side in HDR10 and DV? Sure. But of the movies I've watched in both formats, I've noticed so little of a difference that I usually end up questioning if it's a real difference at all or if it's in my head. There are very few movies where I could recall a specific scene looking better in DV. The leap from SDR to HDR is vastly more significant than HDR10 to DV. I don't really consider the HDR format war as detrimental to the consumer, at least not in the way other format wars have been. What I mean is... as the guy who bought into HD-DVD, my investment became a paperweight when the format failed. With HDR that's not going to happen, because neither the hardware or media are limited to one format. I doubt we will ever see a TV that utilizes HDR as we know it today and does not support HDR10. Likewise I don't think we will ever see a 4K disc released that does not support HDR10. Things get segregated when you get into dynamic-metadata HDR, we obviously have plenty of movies that support DV and not HDR10+, and there are a handful of HDR10+ movies that do not support DV, but in either case you'll always have HDR10 if your TV doesn't support a given films dynamic metadata HDR choice. Thus, even in a hypothetical future where DV looses a format war with HDR10+ and television makers stop supporting it, your entire collection of DV films will still have HDR that works on your HDR10/HDR10+ TV. Circling back to my comment that I still find the difference between the two very slight, I don't loose a lick of sleep wondering if DV is going to be replaced by HDR10+. Hell, I've ripped my collection of ~150 4K discs to a plex server, and that only supports HDR10 anyway. The convenience of Plex, and being able to stream my 4K discs anywhere in my house, supersedes the quality uptick I get by popping in a disk and getting DV.
 
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