X570 Chipset Fans...

M76

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So, I've just finished setting up my 570 build, and the fan is not audible to me. At least on the ROG STRIX X570-F Gaming. it has a blower type fan, I don't know about the other boards.
I can't hear it running even from a few cms. I've tried disconnecting it and heard absolutely no difference.

BTW I don't know how necessary the fan is anyway. Maybe under OC the chipset gets hot, but I measured with a laser thermometer and with stock clocks and the fan disabled that tiny ass heatsink never got hotter than 48C. So If they replaced the fan with an equally sized proper heatsink It would've been more than enough.
 

sirmonkey1985

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So, I've just finished setting up my 570 build, and the fan is not audible to me. At least on the ROG STRIX X570-F Gaming. it has a blower type fan, I don't know about the other boards.
I can't hear it running even from a few cms. I've tried disconnecting it and heard absolutely no difference.

BTW I don't know how necessary the fan is anyway. Maybe under OC the chipset gets hot, but I measured with a laser thermometer and with stock clocks and the fan disabled that tiny ass heatsink never got hotter than 48C. So If they replaced the fan with an equally sized proper heatsink It would've been more than enough.
the reason the fans there is that apparently the chipset has absolutely no temperature protections nor the ability to down clock it's self so there's a very small chance that if there's a thermal runaway (aka if you have auto restart disabled when a BSOD happens and it's stuck like that for hours is a good example) the chipset will not down clock or power the system down. the original theory/rumor was that it had to do with raid 0 NVME pcie 4.0 m.2 drives but that doesn't seem to be the case, even that doesn't put enough load on the chipset for it to matter.
 

mvmiller12

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Well if it does have the current BIOS then board is probably fubar'd because it won't even display the splash screen or POST with everything installed, and it also won't update with everything uninstalled. After multiple attempts I decided to leave the flash process going overnight but that didn't help.

So much for having the new rig up for the weekend!
Apologies if this is old information, but BIOS Flashback on these boards can be a bit sensitive to the type, format and size of the USB stick you are using. I've had that exact same issue you are describing trying to use BIOS flashback with my 64G USB3 Sandisk USB sticks. I had to put the BIOS on a FAT formatted stick that was a lot smaller and then it worked perfectly.
 
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Meeho

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Why even bother with the X570 unless you have very specific storage needs?
 

Aix.

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Apologies if this is old information, but BIOS Flashback on these boards can be a bit sensitive to the type, format and size of the USB stick you are using. I've had that exact same issue you are describing trying to use BIOS flashback with my 64G USB3 Sandisk USB sticks. I had to put the BIOS on a FAT formatted stick that was a lot smaller and then it worked perfectly.
Thanks for this. I wasn't able to get mine to work (8GB USB, FAT32 as per the instructions) but I was able get the support guy to flash it in-store using an old CPU. Ended up spending $100 less for one of the top X470 boards so I'm happy with that.
 

mvmiller12

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Thanks for this. I wasn't able to get mine to work (8GB USB, FAT32 as per the instructions) but I was able get the support guy to flash it in-store using an old CPU. Ended up spending $100 less for one of the top X470 boards so I'm happy with that.
When I said FAT formatted, I ended up having to use a FAT-16 formatted stick (<2G in size). Not sure why the updater is so selective, but it really, really is.
 
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Dan_D

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Why even bother with the X570 unless you have very specific storage needs?
Potentially better overclocking for 12 and 16 core CPU's as well as the ability to clock RAM higher. Not only that, but if the goal is to keep the platform longer, X570 will offer a potentially longer service life due to its more modern and broader feature set. If you want to do things like update your storage or upgrading your graphics card down the line, X570 will offer more performance for those things. Not only that, but X570 offers more PCIe lanes, which is useful to some people.
 

TheHig

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^ With multiple m.2 options, pcie 4.0 and 12 and even 16 core CPUs I can see the x570 boards having legs much like previous intel HEDT stuff. Its a worthy 'tweener' platform for those coming off of x79, x99 and still wanting to get work done as well as play. Those who don't need or have the budget to go all in on TR4 or x299 can get plenty of grunt on x570.

Thats why I made the move anyway.
 

funkydmunky

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Potentially better overclocking for 12 and 16 core CPU's as well as the ability to clock RAM higher.
I am not sure about the CPU OC as I haven't seen anyone compare this yet. Would like some info if available. As for the RAM OC, isn't it fully CPU and not MB dependent? Again, any info or comparisons available?
 

Meeho

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Potentially better overclocking for 12 and 16 core CPU's as well as the ability to clock RAM higher. Not only that, but if the goal is to keep the platform longer, X570 will offer a potentially longer service life due to its more modern and broader feature set. If you want to do things like update your storage or upgrading your graphics card down the line, X570 will offer more performance for those things. Not only that, but X570 offers more PCIe lanes, which is useful to some people.
I would put money that OC won't benefit. PCIE 4.0 is useless for graphics for the lifespan of the platform. Not sure what feature set you're thinking of, I may be missing some. 4.0 chipset connection and specific storage benefits remain, but those are very niche, probably something >95% of Ryzen 3 users won't use.
 

Lepardi

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These chipset fans put me off from upgrading to a Zen 2 system. My 4790K is doing good enough still to carry on to Zen 3, and if they still have fans, I'll get a 2020 intel.

If Intel gets fans with PCI-E 4.0, I'll just get a PS5 and be done with it :dead:
 
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STEM

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the reason the fans there is that apparently the chipset has absolutely no temperature protections nor the ability to down clock it's self so there's a very small chance that if there's a thermal runaway (aka if you have auto restart disabled when a BSOD happens and it's stuck like that for hours is a good example) the chipset will not down clock or power the system down. the original theory/rumor was that it had to do with raid 0 NVME pcie 4.0 m.2 drives but that doesn't seem to be the case, even that doesn't put enough load on the chipset for it to matter.
That's how you make the fat stacks of cash, by spending the least amount of money on R&D and manufacturing. Then release a chipset that puts out 10 to 15 extra watts of heat and suddenly needs a fan. But wait, there more... Motherboard manufacturers in their infinite greed decided that why manufacture proper copper southbridge heatsinks, when painted cast aluminum will do. And this on $500+ motherboards. So there you have it. Greed and profiteering at its finest. Regardless, people will pay for these and no one will care. It will only encourage all these companies, including AMD to rinse and repeat. Intel and the motherboards made for them aren't any better. I don't even want to think about the X299 VRM debacle from 2017... $500+ motherboards VRMs from the X79 and X99 era, but this time around with cast aluminum painted heatsinks. Fuck their greed and sheer stupidity.
 

RamonGTP

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Why even bother with the X570 unless you have very specific storage needs?
Well, for me:

1) I like new shit and I did put my new build together using a PCIe 4 NVME drive.
2) I seem to be keeping every new build longer than the last. My Core 2 Quad setup I kept around for 5 years before I upgraded to a 3770k and I kept that around for 7 years. Now with 12 cores/24 threads, I woudln't be surprised if I kept this thing around for close to decade with nothing more than GPU upgrades every 2 or so years, and i'm sure that at some point during those GPU upgrades, PCIe 4 will yield some benefits.
 
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i have a gigabyte mini itx x570 and have removed the chipset fan . i'm running an aorus M2 gen4 ssd aswell ,
they get cooled by a noctua NH14S dual fan , chipsets temps hover between 40 and 55 degrees while gaming . with stock fan it was way higher ;)
 

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tangoseal

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The fan is necessary. It def gets very hot on the chipset. Though I've been seeing many x470 users have a far better experience than we 570 guys n gals.
 

Aluminum

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Airflow is necessary, keeping the stock chipset fan is not.

I expect many ITX builds will be using top-down CPU coolers (sometimes reversed) to take care of this just like he did.
 
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jmilcher

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The fan is necessary. It def gets very hot on the chipset. Though I've been seeing many x470 users have a far better experience than we 570 guys n gals.
I’m only saying this in hindsight and as a high end x470 board owner.

Thank you AMD for adding the fan to the chipset, and saving me some cash and more importantly the headache.
 

Geronimo

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i have a gigabyte mini itx x570 and have removed the chipset fan . i'm running an aorus M2 gen4 ssd aswell ,
they get cooled by a noctua NH14S dual fan , chipsets temps hover between 40 and 55 degrees while gaming . with stock fan it was way higher ;)
Nice! I'll add that I have the same motherboard, and my stock chipset fan is silent.
 

tangoseal

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Nice! I'll add that I have the same motherboard, and my stock chipset fan is silent.
I dont hear my x570 master either. Probably because I have 6 push pull radiator blowers running.

I've always used headphones. Cant stand speakers. Not even watching netflix or hulu stuff on my puter.
 

mvmiller12

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I dont hear my x570 master either. Probably because I have 6 push pull radiator blowers running.

I've always used headphones. Cant stand speakers. Not even watching netflix or hulu stuff on my puter.
Dude, I am SO opposite of you on this... I got into watercooling in the first place back in the Athlon XP days to have a quieter system. and I hate having a headset on. I will avoid it like the freaking plague because they make my ears hot and sweaty and I can't stand the sensation of something sitting on/clamped to my head. But then, I have been a phone jocky at work for about a decade now, so...
 

faugusztin

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ASUS Pro WS X570-ACE and ROG Crosshair VIII Formula added a fan stop feature to their chipset fans, not sure if other ASUS boards will follow.
 

Dan_D

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I am not sure about the CPU OC as I haven't seen anyone compare this yet. Would like some info if available. As for the RAM OC, isn't it fully CPU and not MB dependent? Again, any info or comparisons available?
Well, if you look at the VRM tables out there for each motherboard, when you evaluate the total power draw of these CPU's, some VRM's come up short.

upload_2019-8-6_14-58-54.png


Source.

As for overclocking the RAM, the memory controller in the CPU is only part of the equation. Some motherboards will clock RAM higher than others. Power phase implementation on the RAM slots, trace layout, PCB layer count, and firmware all factor into memory clocking and even compatibility. I've seen modules work on some motherboards and not others using the same CPU. I've also seen RAM clock to certain speeds on one motherboard and not another. This doesn't apply to just AMD either. Variables like the ones I mentioned impact Intel systems too, just not as badly.
 

tangoseal

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ASUS Pro WS X570-ACE and ROG Crosshair VIII Formula added a fan stop feature to their chipset fans, not sure if other ASUS boards will follow.
I dont think the chipset uses that much energy unless your add in cards are active and nvme stuff. Watching movies etc.. is minimal load. I suspect you fire up a game or do a real heavy transfer then that chipset is going to be real busy making therms.
 

kamikazi

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I don't want to be a guinea pig either. I'm sure AMD and their board partners will address all issues with future releases, however, when I say feature releases I mean new hardware releases. You really can't fix everything with software updates. Also, as Zen 2 matures, we will get better quality silicon. So I am in no rush to be an early adopter.
Generally, unless a new stepping is created all the processors down the road will probably be exactly like the ones we have now. People said similar things about earlier Ryzen CPU's and hoping they would clock better down the line. That never really happened. I wouldn't get your hopes up. Now, people will get better at overclocking them. I certainly can do more with a processor after I've tried it on half a dozen boards than I can on that first one. The information to help people get the most out of a CPU becomes more accessible over time as well, but I've seen no real evidence that the silicon is going to get that much better down the line without a stepping change.

I've had good ones from known bad batches that can do everything the good ones can do. I've had bad processors out of the most desirable batches that weren't worth a damn. You can try and find out which batches, plants, or whatever yield the best possible results but it's still a crap shoot. Beyond that, I don't think that type of shopping behavior or places like Silicon Lottery will help anymore. AMD and Intel are running these CPU's so close to the edge of what they can do, there is virtually zero headroom on them anymore. I think if Intel or AMD suddenly got silicon that was constantly able to go up another 200MHz+, they'd create a new model and sell those as is just to beat their competitor in some benchmarks.
I bought a Core i7 930 very late in the x58 era and it was a complete piece of garbage. It wouldn't go over 3.8 even with voltage I thought was borderline. My buddy bought one like a day before me. We both got them from newegg, but the stock voltage on his was like .075v lower than mine was. I started looking around and people were hitting 4.0 with voltage that wouldn't push mine past 3.6. Mine was on par with an average i7 920 C0, forget the D0 I definitely lost the silicon lottery on that one. It actually seemed to me at the time that early Intel silicon was the best. Maybe their yields improved enough that they could bin with much more precision and ensure that everyone got as little extra free performance as possible.
 

Dan_D

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I bought a Core i7 930 very late in the x58 era and it was a complete piece of garbage. It wouldn't go over 3.8 even with voltage I thought was borderline. My buddy bought one like a day before me. We both got them from newegg, but the stock voltage on his was like .075v lower than mine was. I started looking around and people were hitting 4.0 with voltage that wouldn't push mine past 3.6. Mine was on par with an average i7 920 C0, forget the D0 I definitely lost the silicon lottery on that one. It actually seemed to me at the time that early Intel silicon was the best. Maybe their yields improved enough that they could bin with much more precision and ensure that everyone got as little extra free performance as possible.
I had a different experience. I had a C0 which would do more than 4.0GHz with reasonable voltage while my D0 strugged to hit 4.0 and took more voltage to get there. I think I ended up at 3.8GHz 24/7 on that one. I wouldn't call that Intel's best. Intel got much more consistent with its silicon in later generations. Between Kyle and I, we used probably more than half a dozen 2500K and 2600K CPU's that could all do north of 5.0GHz. I think 5.0GHz was the bad one. We had one that would do 5.2GHz, and a number that hit 5.1GHz with relative ease on most motherboards. He had the 2600K, but I think it was still good for 5.0GHz. Also, Intel's Gulftown Core i7 980X's were excellent in terms of consistency. They did improve slightly on the 990X, but my 980X did every bit of the overclocks I saw on the 990X's. 5960X's were a bit less consistent. I have one that will do 4.4GHz at 1.28v-1.30v depending on the board. The other one does 4.5GHz, but requires 1.35v minimum to achieve that. Meanwhile some other reviewers got boned and ended up stuck at 4.3GHz with shitty voltages. Haswell-E aside, Intel's generally gotten better. I've seen consistent results from everything after that.

Keep in mind that doing reviews, I've literally worked with all Intel's higher end processors. I don't typically just use one either. Kyle would get a few of each from different sources. ASUS would also sample about 100 of each high end CPU and shared their results with us, and sometimes in their overclocking guides that they published for everyone to see. I've also purchased a number of CPU's for my own personal machines over the years as well. So, I have a pretty good idea of what every higher end Intel or AMD can do that's been made over the last 15 years. I've been on both ends of the silicon lottery too. I've got good chips and bad ones. I think right now, Intel's the most consistent it's been with binning in the company's history. I don't know that I've heard of any Core i9 9900K's that can't do 5.0GHz. Some can't do 5.0GHz without an AVX offset, but most can do 5.0GHz as far as I know. AMD is certainly the most consistent its ever been with the Ryzen CPU family. They are all pretty much within a 200MHz range from worst to best, most of them are within 100MHz of each other. That's pretty much regardless of core count or platform.

I'm two for two on Core i9 9900K's hitting 5.0GHz on all cores. I have a 9600K that does 5.1GHz, and so on.
 
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kamikazi

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Der8auer has measured the power consumption of x570 under various load conditions

TLDW version of the video: The X570 chipset will be around 10 watts for most users. I would guess maybe 12 to 13 watts in extreme use cases of gaming and copying large files between NVME x4.0 drives at the same time. A cheap heatsink and fan is cheaper than a good heatsink with no fan.
 
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DogsofJune

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Waterblock it / End thread


I despise little fans and the high pitched whistle noises they seem to enjoy producing with such zest and fervor. Damn them all!
 

Kenshin1

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My X570 Taichis fan was loud for about 30minutes after I installed the board, then iit stopped making a racket. Ive now had the board about 3 months, and today... the chipset fan is back to making a damned racket, driving me nuts
 

GotNoRice

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My X570 Taichis fan was loud for about 30minutes after I installed the board, then iit stopped making a racket. Ive now had the board about 3 months, and today... the chipset fan is back to making a damned racket, driving me nuts
What are your ambient temperatures? What is your case airflow like? Do you have a hot videocard sitting right on top of the chipset?

The fan exists mainly because some people will end up using their motherboard in a case with no airflow inside a stuffy 90F+ apartment. For a normal enthusiast case with multiple 120/140mm case fans, inside an air conditioned home, the fan should almost never even turn on.

Also, many/most motherboards allow at least rudimentary control over the chipset fan profile via a setting in the bios. What is yours set to?
 

Rvenger

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Repaste the chipset. Problem solved. My MSI board fan doesn't even spin and temps dropped 20c from that cheap thermal pad they used.
 

zpackrat

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Repaste the chipset. Problem solved. My MSI board fan doesn't even spin and temps dropped 20c from that cheap thermal pad they used.
I did this on my GB x570 Ultra and it had a positive affect. The thermal gum they use lasts, but is not good for thermals overall IMO. This is no different than any other gear with a heatsink in that I always replace the thermal paste/pad/gum. Did this on my xbox one x when upgrading to a hybrid 2TB drive and not only improved thermals, but made it far more quiet under load.
 

yowen

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I'll have to repaste my Asus TUF X570, I imagine it'll be the same story. I just built it so I have evaluated which fans are loudest yet.
 

Jamie Marsala

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My X570 Taichis fan was loud for about 30minutes after I installed the board, then iit stopped making a racket. Ive now had the board about 3 months, and today... the chipset fan is back to making a damned racket, driving me nuts
That is to bad. My MIS MEG Ace rarely ever spins up and there is a heatpipe between it and my VRM's to help spread out the hear load. And when it does run the chipset never gets hot enough to make it spin fast enough to hear it. I only hear if I completely power down the PC or when I was making BIOS changes to tweak my RAM.
 

CraptacularOne

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The chipset fan on my ASUS Crosshair is so quiet that if I didn't know it was there, I wouldn't have known it was there.
 

exdriver

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Chipset fans on the motherboard? Not in the last 10 years, and not now. Taking a hard look at AMD's boards since Ryzen seems actually good it's the same damn problem that it has always been. AMD makes a good chip but what are you going to run it on? You could go for a B550, but that seems like a halfway solution for a 3900, which is the only chip that really comes close in single thread, or the x570 that has a fan on the board. Call me old but I've always taken a fan on the board as a sign that it runs too hot and with age that board will need to be replaced too soon. Maybe that's not the case here, but it always has been in the past and I just don't trust that junk. $700 for a motherboard? I mean... what does it do besides not have a fan that justifies that price? Sigh. I'd love to find a board for AMD that I thought really checked all the boxes but right now it looks like that's going to have to wait until x570 has more fanless designs or we get a new chipset that doesn't run hot. Just to make matters worse that damn fan is placed right over where your video card is going. So if I wanted or needed to pull that fan I'd have to use a replacement (that will never be widely available) or get a makeshift flat heatsink to put there that probably won't do the job or they would have just put a heatsink there in the first place.

Sigh... just no. Same old story.
 
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