Windows 8 Release Preview Download

GoldenTiger

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Not_sure_if_serious.jpg

Windows is quite a serious OS.

Windows 8 is an improvement of it.
 

atomik77

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You don't have to use Metro any more often than you had to click the start button before, it IS the start button now. If anything it's nicer because instead of searching a small rectangle at the bottom left of your screen for programs you have installed, you now have them all full screen to easily spot/see. People complaining about being forced to use Metro I'm pretty sure never complained about being forced to use the start menu.

After reading this simple description it changes the way I look at Windows 8. For some reason I didn't put it together and I don't think a lot of people are. When you forget about Metro being anything more then a fancy start menu, it starts to make sense. In fact very little has changed when you look at it that way, how much time do you spend in the start menu?
 

Allos

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Didn't know the Media Center for Windows 8 will be a separate, paid for add-on, rather than being integrated into the OS. Another reason for me to stay with W7....
 

oldpablo

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After reading this simple description it changes the way I look at Windows 8. For some reason I didn't put it together and I don't think a lot of people are. When you forget about Metro being anything more then a fancy start menu, it starts to make sense. In fact very little has changed when you look at it that way, how much time do you spend in the start menu?

And you still have the ability to pin your favorite common programs to the task bar so basically 990 of your desktop experience hasn't changed. What has improved though is the ecosystem.
 

heatlesssun

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On a 720P monitor, you can pin like 20 programs on the task bar, far more than most will ever use routinely or otherwise.

But I'm the kind of guy that's actually starting to like the Start Screen. Really, when this all gets fleshed out at some point on a big screen you can see one screen with everything in life at a moment. Not maybe Windows 8 but here's as many point love to point out, every other version of Windows sucks. And Windows 7 followed Vista. And while Vista had plenty of issues 7 was built on the crushed bones of Vista and not radically different. Metro and the Start Screen will improve, but even in face of the great failure that was Vista, 7 was far from a radical change from Vista.

Windows 8 may fail. But Windows 9 will be called Windows 8 R2 and sell a zillion copies. Metro is here to stay.
 
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You don't have to use Metro any more often than you had to click the start button before, it IS the start button now. If anything it's nicer because instead of searching a small rectangle at the bottom left of your screen for programs you have installed, you now have them all full screen to easily spot/see. People complaining about being forced to use Metro I'm pretty sure never complained about being forced to use the start menu.

They most likely complained when Microsoft removed the code to use the Windows 95 style start menu in Windows 7.
 

heatlesssun

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It actually is. You probably whined about XP looking childish, huh?

People don't seem to remember there where a TON of doubts about XP from the UI to the embarrassing security issues, app compatibility, etc. For some reason people think it's only every other version of Windows that sucks. At the start they ALL suck in the eyes of the IT pundit. Even Windows 7 is still called Vista R2.

Windows 7 was a little different in that there was a lot of pent up demand from XP to Vista that got really slammed to 7 that got slammed not so much for a new Microsoft OS that wasn't at least the Spawn of Satan.

People don't really love Windows. The power of Windows comes in it's 3rd party support. Good touch Windows 8 hardware at good prices and Windows 8 is a hit. Otherwise it's not, that simple.
 

heatlesssun

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They most likely complained when Microsoft removed the code to use the Windows 95 style start menu in Windows 7.

Another of Microsoft's conundrums. Okay, lets say the majority of people hate Windows 8 online, that's probably an accurate statement. But when does the general geek public actually praise Windows or Microsoft tech in general? Just doesn't happen. Right now there are a few that like Windows 7 that didn't call it Vista R2.

Bottom line, Microsoft can't really on public opinion anymore Jack the Ripper. It has to be selective about feedback and customer response because A) You hate Windows and always talk about going to a Mac or Linux or B) Can't satisfy a billion plus users unless every copy of Windows contains a kilo of coke.
 

Trimlock

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It actually is. You probably whined about XP looking childish, huh?

Hah! I forgot about those complaints.

People bitching about Win8 reminds me of people bitching about Vista, I have a seriously hard time remembering I'm not on a Win7 PC when I'm at work, they are just too similar. I know about the difference but the people still complaining about Vista saying it sucks/sucked really doesn't understand about the infrastructure change and the growing pains that MS had to go through.

I think Win8 will be that. They want to make sure they can keep their ecosystem with Apple trying to get their fingers into everything and this is a great way to ensure their dominance. Will Win8 be rememberable? maybe!

I'm not upgrading at home emmediately except for wifes laptop, but sometime down the road I will pick it up for all of mine. :cool:
 

Kueller

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Most of the complaints I'm hearing about Win8 are cosmetic and/or about optional features. I haven't heard a lot about issues that plagued past Windows flops: Stability and compatibility issues. ME bombed due to terrible stability problems. Vista bombed mainly due to immature 64 bit driver support by hardware manufacturers.

I actually think Win8 will be quite successful with the enthusiast community once people learn how to customize it to their liking. For the mainstream user I think it will be a big hit, people don't want to think about (or deal with) the technical aspects of their computers, covering up all the technical aspects with big pictures is a sure fire winner.

About the only technical aspect remaining visible to the user is the fact you can still see the file structure. I'm waiting for the day when you can no longer decide where your files are stored, you just select a tag and the computer decides where to save it...
 

Dekoth-E-

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It actually is. You probably whined about XP looking childish, huh?

No, it actually isn't. I have used Win 8 quite extensively and it offers very little over Win 7 to a desktop/laptop. It is a tablet OS a great tablet os at that but nothing more than a shitty port as far as actual productivity machines are concerned.

No, I never whined about XP looking childish. There is a huge difference between an OS just having a terrible color scheme and being fundamentally poorly designed. I never liked XP, but that is not due to the UI. As far as the colors, it was easy enough to change that and XP still had the fundamentals of a solid productivity OS (Obviously). Your comparison is terrible because there is a huge difference between simply not liking the colors and the functional design of the entire UI being awful. The functional design of Win 8 on anything but a touch device is absolutely awful.
 

Chimel

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Most of the complaints I'm hearing about Win8 are cosmetic
Exactly, and we're not asking you to believe it, just sharing our experience of playing with the different previews.
But eventually ergonomics is what makes or kill an operating system, because that's what you use all the time everyday. The mixed Metro/Desktop UI does bug me on several counts, and I never could get used to it on a standard desktop PC. The Metro Start splash screen just feels to flashy and I find it unnecessary to hide all my windowed apps just to call another app or tool that is not on the taskbar.

I understand that Microsoft needed a whole new framework to really make touch work and to introduce apps that don't have the burden of the legacy and compatibility of all previous versions of Windows, and it's actually something that I applaud, but the way it was implemented is just not working for many desktop users, and touch is limited to a few applications, like small mobile devices.

I wonder if the Metro tiles could not be available on the Desktop UI, à la Active Desktop, where you could pin WMP frames playing whole movies on the desktop.

This whole new UI is great to reflect changes in technology, such as touch, but desktop PCs in the enterprise or home don't have touch and feel left behind. Even touch users for that matter, since there are virtually no Metro app available at launch, a very limited choice of devices, and they're still forced to dig into the Desktop UI for some Windows tasks.

Regardless, don't take the word of the "complainers" for it, each to their own opinion, and let the sales figures decide whether it's a success or not. Windows 7 was what Vista should have been, so everybody and their dog rushed on it, but my guess is that this will not happen for Windows 8. I even wonder if OEMs will play the game: So far, they have always shipped their PCs with the latest version of Windows, but there might be a demand to have modern PCs pre-installed with Windows 7 even after Windows 8 releases if people see Windows 8 as a "touch" OS.
 

Kueller

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I even wonder if OEMs will play the game: So far, they have always shipped their PCs with the latest version of Windows, but there might be a demand to have modern PCs pre-installed with Windows 7 even after Windows 8 releases if people see Windows 8 as a "touch" OS.

You wonder if OEMs will play a game where they can "customize" your entire start screen with proprietary apps/bloatware/live advertising feeds instead of having to settle for just filling your desktop with icons to things you actually have to click on to activate? Yes, yes, 1000 times yes, they will play that game and love it.
 

heatlesssun

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Most of the complaints I'm hearing about Win8 are cosmetic and/or about optional features. I haven't heard a lot about issues that plagued past Windows flops: Stability and compatibility issues. ME bombed due to terrible stability problems. Vista bombed mainly due to immature 64 bit driver support by hardware manufacturers.

Absolutely.


Exactly, and we're not asking you to believe it, just sharing our experience of playing with the different previews.
But eventually ergonomics is what makes or kill an operating system, because that's what you use all the time everyday. The mixed Metro/Desktop UI does bug me on several counts, and I never could get used to it on a standard desktop PC. The Metro Start splash screen just feels to flashy and I find it unnecessary to hide all my windowed apps just to call another app or tool that is not on the taskbar.

The this is though when is the last time anyone has praised Windows for its wonderful UI. Never. OS X is routinely considered a superior UI by the pundits and even in the court of general public opinion. I think a lot of people are waxing nostalgic over the 17 year old Windows Start Menu desktop UI ant seeing it in a light it simply never has been.

In other words average people use Windows and just accept the UI for what it is. Usually tolerating it, often cursing at it but never really liking it.

I understand that Microsoft needed a whole new framework to really make touch work and to introduce apps that don't have the burden of the legacy and compatibility of all previous versions of Windows, and it's actually something that I applaud, but the way it was implemented is just not working for many desktop users, and touch is limited to a few applications, like small mobile devices.

Not really sure what you're trying to say here. Touch in Windows 8 like Windows 7 is system wide, there's nothing to prevent on from using touch on the desktop, I've been doing that for years though the desktop and the vast bulk of desktop apps aren't designed for touch. Windows 8 does actually improve the touch experience in Windows Explorer substantially with the Ribbon and fuzzy targeting. And there's nothing to prevent developers to make desktop applications that touch capable. The Angry Bird games on Windows are desktop apps that are just as touch friendly on Windows 7 and 8 as they are on tablet OS devices.

I wonder if the Metro tiles could not be available on the Desktop UI, à la Active Desktop, where you could pin WMP frames playing whole movies on the desktop.

This is primarily a security issue. Microsoft claims that Metro on the desktop negates the sandboxing of Metro apps.

This whole new UI is great to reflect changes in technology, such as touch, but desktop PCs in the enterprise or home don't have touch and feel left behind. Even touch users for that matter, since there are virtually no Metro app available at launch, a very limited choice of devices, and they're still forced to dig into the Desktop UI for some Windows tasks.

Regardless, don't take the word of the "complainers" for it, each to their own opinion, and let the sales figures decide whether it's a success or not. Windows 7 was what Vista should have been, so everybody and their dog rushed on it, but my guess is that this will not happen for Windows 8. I even wonder if OEMs will play the game:
So far, they have always shipped their PCs with the latest version of Windows, but there might be a demand to have modern PCs pre-installed with Windows 7 even after Windows 8 releases if people see Windows 8 as a "touch" OS.

Windows 8 will succeed or fail on the hardware that's available. I think you're going to be surprised by the amount and variety of touch capable hardware. Intel is deeply involved with OEMs on ultrabook designs of all sorts with touch, Intel is claiming that there's over a hundred such products from all of the major OEMs in the works.

And the Metro app library will grow at a phenomenal rate. Even if Windows 8 only sells at the rate of Vista, that's still hundreds of millions of devices that can run Metro apps, far too large of a market for developers to ignore.
 

Chimel

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Intel is deeply involved with OEMs on ultrabook designs of all sorts with touch, Intel is claiming that there's over a hundred such products from all of the major OEMs in the works.

And the Metro app library will grow at a phenomenal rate. Even if Windows 8 only sells at the rate of Vista, that's still hundreds of millions of devices that can run Metro apps, far too large of a market for developers to ignore.
100 products even if they all are available at launch is still an extremely limited choice. Most people prefer the freedom of a wireless mouse even on a touchpad for tasks such as browsing or Powerpoint presentations in a meeting, that can be done from a reclining chair, rather than moving your whole body forward to touch the screen every time you need to click on a link.

And I agree Metro apps will grow, of course. I said there's too few available "at launch."
I am not sure however every developer will convert their apps to Metro when they can run perfectly well on a Windows 8 (or XP/Vista/7) desktop without any change. We'll probably need to wait for source code converters for this to happen on a large scale. The cost of maintaining 2 separate application platforms for the same app is hugely prohibitive. It will take several years before the Windows 8 market overtakes the XP/Vista/7 market.
 

archevilangel

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So much crying over metro. I actually like it, rather than having to stare at a tiny start menu in the bottom right of my tripple screen setup, I can actually sit back and see what I am doing. Not that my eyes are particularly bad (20:25 uncorrected), but this is a god send. Not to mention Live Tiles convey information at a glance. I already love this on my Windows Phone, but being able to see my Email, Messages, how the stock market is doing, what the weather is like, all at once is awesome.
 

Dekoth-E-

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So much crying over metro. I actually like it, rather than having to stare at a tiny start menu in the bottom right of my tripple screen setup, I can actually sit back and see what I am doing. Not that my eyes are particularly bad (20:25 uncorrected), but this is a god send. Not to mention Live Tiles convey information at a glance. I already love this on my Windows Phone, but being able to see my Email, Messages, how the stock market is doing, what the weather is like, all at once is awesome.

So you like a cluttered desktop..good for you. I want nothing except a picture on mine. All most of us who are sane are asking for is a choice. That isn't an unreasonable demand for a "supposedly" consumer aimed interface. Let those that like the cluttered mess of metro have it and let those who hate it use a proven standard.
 

heatlesssun

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So you like a cluttered desktop..good for you. I want nothing except a picture on mine. All most of us who are sane are asking for is a choice. That isn't an unreasonable demand for a "supposedly" consumer aimed interface. Let those that like the cluttered mess of metro have it and let those who hate it use a proven standard.

And plenty of us who are sane who have thought about this and it's just isn't as simply as having two different UIs and that's it. That inherently adds more complexity and confusion to a product that's already complex and considered confusing by a lot of people.
 

oldpablo

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So you like a cluttered desktop..good for you. I want nothing except a picture on mine. All most of us who are sane are asking for is a choice. That isn't an unreasonable demand for a "supposedly" consumer aimed interface. Let those that like the cluttered mess of metro have it and let those who hate it use a proven standard.

What exactly stops you from having a clear desktop in windows 8? Nobody is forcing you to leave the Metro start menu open, do you leave your start menu open all the time right now?
 

Dekoth-E-

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And plenty of us who are sane who have thought about this and it's just isn't as simply as having two different UIs and that's it. That inherently adds more complexity and confusion to a product that's already complex and considered confusing by a lot of people.

Already responded in the other thread heatless..It doesn't really add any complexity.

What exactly stops you from having a clear desktop in windows 8? Nobody is forcing you to leave the Metro start menu open, do you leave your start menu open all the time right now?

I don't need my start menu to take up my entire 24" monitor.
I don't need my "hot points" to be on the far fucking end of a triple 24" monitor setup.
I don't want my computer to Auto boot straight into that tiled bullshit.
I don't want my productivity machine acting like a 10" tablet.
I want my Productivity machine to have a Productivity UI, Not a Consumption UI.

Is that really so hard to grasp? You want it, you like it. That's great. I don't I have tried it and frankly it sucks. I love it on a tablet but it is a constant source of "piss off" on my desktop. There is literally nothing I like about metro on my desktop, it is a freaking horribly designed and terrible to look at UI for a large monitor environment. It is Microsoft's windows version of a console port to a PC. It wasn't designed for my PC and it reminds you every time you attempt to do anything. My desktop monitors are getting bigger, not smaller and aren't including touch ever. I have no need or desire to have a touch oriented OS on it.
 

ManofGod

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Already responded in the other thread heatless..It doesn't really add any complexity.



I don't need my start menu to take up my entire 24" monitor.
I don't need my "hot points" to be on the far fucking end of a triple 24" monitor setup.
I don't want my computer to Auto boot straight into that tiled bullshit.
I don't want my productivity machine acting like a 10" tablet.
I want my Productivity machine to have a Productivity UI, Not a Consumption UI.

Is that really so hard to grasp? You want it, you like it. That's great. I don't I have tried it and frankly it sucks. I love it on a tablet but it is a constant source of "piss off" on my desktop. There is literally nothing I like about metro on my desktop, it is a freaking horribly designed and terrible to look at UI for a large monitor environment. It is Microsoft's windows version of a console port to a PC. It wasn't designed for my PC and it reminds you every time you attempt to do anything. My desktop monitors are getting bigger, not smaller and aren't including touch ever. I have no need or desire to have a touch oriented OS on it.

Oh, and if you had no metro but just the other changes, you would whine and saying" I am not Fing paying for this, its just windows 7 SP2, give me everything for free."
 

ManofGod

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So you like a cluttered desktop..good for you. I want nothing except a picture on mine. All most of us who are sane are asking for is a choice. That isn't an unreasonable demand for a "supposedly" consumer aimed interface. Let those that like the cluttered mess of metro have it and let those who hate it use a proven standard.

Then just keep using Windows 7, not to difficult, eh? The fact that you use expletives and absolutes in the negative does not make them so.
 

fleggett

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Not to derail the conversation, but I just had a WTF moment with the RP and would like some feedback.

Does Win8 save your favorites (and possibly other data items) to a cloud of some sort? I ask because I just installed the RP yesterday and, much to my surprise, it automagically restored my IE bookmarks. I was fully expecting to have to use Xmarks for that purpose, but the combination of Win8 and IE10 seems to've made an application like Xmarks academic (perhaps LastPass, too).

I performed a clean, non-upgrade installation of the RP by deleting and reformatting the system drive first.

I'm not entirely sure I like the idea of this sort of personal data being stored somewhere in cyberspace without having direct access and control over it. I appreciate how it saved some labor and has apparently made something like Xmarks obsolete, but still, where exactly did the Consumer Preview save my favorites and what else did it archive?

Thanks in advance.
 

heatlesssun

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Already responded in the other thread heatless..It doesn't really add any complexity.

I responded as well in the other thread, but here's another point.

With devices like the my Lenovo 220t convertible Tablet PC or Samsung Series 7 Slate it would be beyond pointless to have two completely different OS UIs. So in desktop mode you get this UI but in tablet mode in a dock you get this UI unless you turn off the UI switch and then running as a tablet you get the desktop UI?

I don't think people that think the UI switch is simple have used Tablet PCs much and don't understand just how instant the transition to desktop to tablet can be with Windows or that all input methods are always available no matter the form factor. There are going to be FAR more touch enable PCs than ever before with Windows 8. People thinking the UI switch is a great idea are thinking that PCs aren't going to be radically different from todays versions. Considering the horrific plight of the many PC OEMs, they had better be.
 

Dekoth-E-

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Oh, and if you had no metro but just the other changes, you would whine and saying" I am not Fing paying for this, its just windows 7 SP2, give me everything for free."

You don't know me very well then. I was never in the camp that made that whine about Win 7 from Vista. I didn't have a pressing need to buy it day one, but I bought it fairly quickly without complaint. I would of bought Win 8 for the ribbon changes alone in the first 3-6 months just the same. But Good job making stupid assumptions.

Then just keep using Windows 7, not to difficult, eh? The fact that you use expletives and absolutes in the negative does not make them so.

You don't get to condemn my posts when your first reply to be contains abbreviated vulgarity. I will continue using windows 7, that is less the issue then not wanting all future versions of windows to go down this path. I for one don't desire to be stuck on the same OS for 10 years. I dumped XP as quickly as I reasonably could. I am not one to resist change for the sake of resisting change. I resist change that is bad change and Win 8 is generally terrible change.
 

Dekoth-E-

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Oh, and if you had no metro but just the other changes, you would whine and saying" I am not Fing paying for this, its just windows 7 SP2, give me everything for free."

Then just keep using Windows 7, not to difficult, eh? The fact that you use expletives and absolutes in the negative does not make them so.

I responded as well in the other thread, but here's another point.

With devices like the my Lenovo 220t convertible Tablet PC or Samsung Series 7 Slate it would be beyond pointless to have two completely different OS UIs. So in desktop mode you get this UI but in tablet mode in a dock you get this UI unless you turn off the UI switch and then running as a tablet you get the desktop UI?

I don't think people that think the UI switch is simple have used Tablet PCs much and don't understand just how instant the transition to desktop to tablet can be with Windows or that all input methods are always available no matter the form factor. There are going to be FAR more touch enable PCs than ever before with Windows 8. People thinking the UI switch is a great idea are thinking that PCs aren't going to be radically different from todays versions. Considering the horrific plight of the many PC OEMs, they had better be.

A hybrid device should always be treated like a tablet unless the user specifies otherwise.

Problem solved.

Or to simplify -

Any device that has a touch device primary, the default UI settings are Metro.

Any device that has no touch, the default UI settings are Aero.

UI Changes Require a reboot.

There you go..all problems solved and any level of complexity accounted for. Everyone walks away happy and users like myself no longer have a reason to bitch.
 

heatlesssun

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Oh, and if you had no metro but just the other changes, you would whine and saying" I am not Fing paying for this, its just windows 7 SP2, give me everything for free."

Exactly. It just doesn't matter what Microsoft does to Windows, millions will hate it.

For all of it's pitfalls Windows has some unique capabilities that aren't easily replaced. Yes people will bitch and moan about Windows 8 sucks I'll by a Mac. But really, if you could have bought a Mac to do the things you're doing why now? Hell, everyone thinks Macs are better and have the most awesome UI known to man kind, of course until that Mac doesn't do something they want.

Microsoft is leveraging the power of Windows while there's still time. Seriously, Metro opponents act as though the PC industry is alive and well and that analysts are undercutting everything in the PC world because of the iPad.

To Microsoft's advantage, few people care about Windows and millions thinks it sucks ass no matter what. The Windows UI to many is already complete crap. At least now that UI will have the next version of Angry Birds on a touch screen. Actually, it does now. But of course no one knows that Windows 7 is the only OS that allows one to play Angry Birds with mice and touch screens and at 5760x1080 resolution.
 

heatlesssun

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A hybrid device should always be treated like a tablet unless the user specifies otherwise.

Problem solved.

Or to simplify -

Any device that has a touch device primary, the default UI settings are Metro.

Any device that has no touch, the default UI settings are Aero.

UI Changes Require a reboot.

There you go..all problems solved and any level of complexity accounted for. Everyone walks away happy and users like myself no longer have a reason to bitch.

Solves nothing. The whole premise of Metro opponents is that it doesn't work with a mouse and keyboard. Thing is I can have a mouse and keyboard and touch and pen on one device simultaneously. You keep thinking about desktop mode and tablet mode when the reality is all these things are always available,

Just think about it from a marketing perceptive. I've got my nice shinny $1500 hybrid device running Windows 8. Keyboard, slick touch gestures track pad and even a pen. But to gain maximum efficiency while using a keyboard and mouse I need to turn off Metro? Why didn't Microsoft make the UI work well with all the input devices without switching modes?
 

lightp2

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Microsoft dilemma

A. Please note that below are very common in life so really it is nothing to treat it differently.

1. If Multiple alternatives are available
1.1 Desktop app will continue to Classic Microsoft Desktop path
1.2 WinRT will of course go with Metro
1.3 Due to law of inertia, the development is pretty easy to see.

2. But Microsoft intends to learn from Apple and Google, combined.
2.1 They look at Mac OS Classic and see how difficult is to move something off to newer path. Note that the old Mac OS Classic has much smaller audience than today's WindowsXP/Vista/7/2003srv/2003r2srv/2008srv/2008r2srv
2.2 They look at Google and then Apple to know that Google is Global Internet Services in full-scale preparation and Apple already has Global Full-Scale Multimedia/App-Store in operation.

3. Here lies the debatable points.
3.1 Microsoft obviously has extremely large incentive to find a path.
3.2 As pointed by some, Microsoft help employ a large percentile of IT hardware/software companies.

4. The thing is
4.1 Everyone knows Microsoft is profit-oriented organization.
4.2 Many also know Microsoft serves a very much wider audience, casual to critical, in comparison to, maybe more restricted audience of iOS, and different background of Android populace.
4.3 So Microsoft wants to cramp a super-set onto a subset, per the view of some.
4.4 A few days ago I read "news on electronic media" Andromeda galaxy is on a collision course to Milky Way Galaxy...

5. Cannot say which is which, various threads have presented views from many angles in plain, everyone seems to have valid circumstances...
 

heatlesssun

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5. Cannot say which is which, various threads have presented views from many angles in plain, everyone seems to have valid circumstances...

Two things of note, Apple and Google are also profit-oriented organizations by definition as both are also publicly traded companies like Microsoft.

And secondly as much as people want to say that Microsoft is copying Apple with Windows 8, in many ways Microsoft is actually copying itself. The heart and soul of Windows 8 is very much derived from the concept of the Tablet PC a decade ago. Yes there's the app store and full screen apps and Metro, but Windows 8 still retains all of the original capabilities of the Tablet PC launched in 2002 and even will be available on hardware that was first sold at retail at that type. Convertible touch screen devices and even hybrid devices existed in the Windows world long before iOS or Android.

While Microsoft isn't a great innovator and indeed lags far behind Google and Apple in mobile technology Microsoft was in the market with tablets and smart phones well before Apple and Google. No they didn't sell zillions of tablets, but they did sell millions before Apple or Google sold one.

One reason I think that Microsoft might do better with Windows 8 than many think is because they really have been here before. Indeed, this past week when Tim Cook was roasting Windows 8 even he acknowledged Microsoft's bleeding edge work in tablets.

Believe it or not, the real core of Windows 8 really was Microsoft's idea from 10 years ago, an all in one PC device that can work with multiple input devices and form factors. Many will say that if it failed then why would it work now which is a valid question. The answer is that x86 is MUCH better than 10 years ago and that Windows 8 is MUCH better than XP on tablets. That may not be enough to win in the market place but it is true.
 

Tudz

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7,434
Oh, and if you had no metro but just the other changes, you would whine and saying" I am not Fing paying for this, its just windows 7 SP2, give me everything for free."

People defending W8 make all these stupid assumptions about those with complaints. Let's add this one to the list.
 

heatlesssun

Extremely [H]
Joined
Nov 5, 2005
Messages
44,154
People defending W8 make all these stupid assumptions about those with complaints. Let's add this one to the list.

I agree. But only to the extent that you really know how most people will respond to Windows 8. I admit, Windows 8 was completely natural to me. It's like a god send to a tablet PC user. It's the most natural thing UI I've ever seen because I used Windows across form factors and input capabilities.

What has bothered me about this debate is that I'm having a pretty large disconnect with those who don't have experience with Windows on multiple form factors. However than does tell me something which does seem to be popular opinion online. Windows 8 is actually a solid touch UI, people will condemn Windows 8 on desktops but at the same time think that it does work with touch devices.

Another reason why I think Windows 8 has a chance. I can't wait to see how the pundits will say something like "Windows 8 has a solid touch experience. But the keyboard and mouse experience is subpar. But didn't I just tell you last week that this is post-PC era?, Fuck."
 

Tudz

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Jun 15, 2008
Messages
7,434
I agree. But only to the extent that you really know how most people will respond to Windows 8. I admit, Windows 8 was completely natural to me. It's like a god send to a tablet PC user. It's the most natural thing UI I've ever seen because I used Windows across form factors and input capabilities.

What has bothered me about this debate is that I'm having a pretty large disconnect with those who don't have experience with Windows on multiple form factors. However than does tell me something which does seem to be popular opinion online. Windows 8 is actually a solid touch UI, people will condemn Windows 8 on desktops but at the same time think that it does work with touch devices.
I don't think anyone is denying W8 as a having a good touch interface. I think you'd struggle to find many posts arguing that point. At some point I have said that W8 on touch devices will have more competition than Windows on desktop and traditional laptops, but to find people saying it's a bad touch interface, yeah, not so much.

Another reason why I think Windows 8 has a chance. I can't wait to see how the pundits will say something like "Windows 8 has a solid touch experience. But the keyboard and mouse experience is subpar. But didn't I just tell you last week that this is post-PC era?, Fuck."
The contention of most people with complaints is we AREN'T in a post-PC era and we won't be in a post-PC era for a long time. Even if touch is increasing, PC ain't going away just like that. For that reason, I maintain that if MS want's in on the tablet/phone market they should design a SEPARATE OS for tablet/touch instead of trying to mash both a touch interface and a regular desktop interface together.

I do want crossover between my mobile devices and my desktop, I DON'T want that crossover in the form of the same programs, interface and OS. I want it in the form of local cloud interaction between devices and unique programs and interfaces that are capable of accessing/editing the same files.
 

thelead

2[H]4U
Joined
May 28, 2005
Messages
2,222
This is the first time I will not update my desktop OS with a new windows release. I'll probably buy a tablet with W8 but I just can't get used to it on a desktop with a mouse.
 
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