Windows 11 Market Share Keeps Declining

Zarathustra[H]

Extremely [H]
Joined
Oct 29, 2000
Messages
39,122
Surprisingly, Windows 11 Market Share Keeps going down, allowing Windows 10 to climb above the 70% mark.

Even with previous unpopular releases (like Windows 8) their market share didn't decline until after their successors were launched.


1685612544_windows_logos_story.jpg


It's a little puzzling as to what is going on here. Are people just moving back to Windows 10? If so, why?
 
In before MS white knights come in here and tell you that Windows 11 is perfect and there aren't ads for them - YOU ARE the problem.

Seriously though, Windows 10 was the last version of windows that I will have used. If only MS cared more about innovation and less about ad revenue.
 
In before MS white knights come in here and tell you that Windows 11 is perfect and there aren't ads for them - YOU ARE the problem.

Seriously though, Windows 10 was the last version of windows that I will have used. If only MS cared more about innovation and less about ad revenue.
Home edition Windows 11 is straight garbage, it should not be a thing, Pro and up are fine, but home is an abomination that must be ended and Microsoft deserves to be punished because of it.
 
In before MS white knights come in here and tell you that Windows 11 is perfect and there aren't ads for them - YOU ARE the problem.

Seriously though, Windows 10 was the last version of windows that I will have used. If only MS cared more about innovation and less about ad revenue.
Yeah, it's a big problem, even on Win 11 Pro. Multiple hits every hour back to MS.

1714607998328.png
 
Home edition Windows 11 is straight garbage, it should not be a thing, Pro and up are fine, but home is an abomination that must be ended and Microsoft deserves to be punished because of it.
easy there, white knight! ;) its very much this. but what do we know. copilot is something to really be mad about.
 
You guys do realize Windows 11 can never replace Windows 10 as most of those Windows 10 devices can't even run Windows 11 due to the new hardware requirements. So there's really no news there, it is by design - for better or for worse. TPM modules and all of that...
 
Last edited:
You guys do realize Windows 11 can never replace Windows 10 as most of those Windows 10 devices can't even run Windows 11 due to the new hardware requirements. So there's really no news there, it is by design - for better or for worse. TPM modules and all of that...

true but when normies w10 machines start dying theyll just get 11 ones and it will probably rebound.
 
easy there, white knight! ;) its very much this. but what do we know. copilot is something to really be mad about.
Honestly not on the business side, it’s the only one of the AI tools I’ve found that doesn’t use user input to train. The PIA for it was simple. But on the home front the methods they are using to force it down people’s throats is somewhat detestable. I grow tired of Microsoft’s constant force feeding of services to the home users when they should be opt in services not hide it and ignore it if you don’t want it services.
 
Remember back in the day when we used antivirus programs to hunt down and eliminate spyware that were tracking our every move and sending data back to the mothership, completely invading our privacy? And then Microsoft saw that spyware and decided to turn it into an operating system?
 
true but when normies w10 machines start dying theyll just get 11 ones and it will probably rebound.
It's always what happens with Windows. Most people are real apathetic about upgrades so it doesn't happen until it is forced or happens naturally through attrition.

Funny thing is, same shit happens with Linux a lot too. You don't tend to see it in reporting since it usually all gets folded in to one "Linux" category but we see it at work all the time. For the systems we don't manage students will install generally the latest Ubutnu LTS and then never upgrade it to a newer one. Plenty of the time they won't even let it patch itself for security updates.

Sysadmins can be really bad about it too. Every time I've talked to one of our vendors for support they are always happy that our stuff is on the latest patch because it is easier to support. I asked NetApp about it once and the guy said "You have no idea, we get so many people running versions long out of support with tons of issues."

It's just human nature. People get something that works and then don't want to spend any effort to change, or even will spend some effort to block change.
 
I predict more dual boot systems, game on one and use daily on the other.
Few will bother. Setting up a dual boot system isn't hard, but it is a lot harder than just updating your OS. Despite what the nerd rage here may tell you, the reason people are on 10 is because it works fine and they don't bother to upgrade, not because 11 is bad. You aren't going to see many people want to go through the trouble of a dual boot.

Even those that do, most will end up just not using one of the partitions hardly at all. The issue is that all OSes can do the basic "browse the web n' watch videos" just fine. There's no advantage to that in Linux. However if you are dual booting because of games, Windows will do that just fine AND play your games. What it means is people will just not bother to boot into their other partition because it's inconvenient. We don't do dual-boot systems at work for that precise reason. Some students will request it because they need Windows for the software they use, but the Linux = l33t and want both. The problem we find is that one of the partitions gets used, the other does and thus gets way out of date on patches. So we push VMs where you run whatever OS you'll be doing the bulk of you work on as the host, and the other as the guest. Most people end up quickly just using the host and the VM goes away. For the others that really do need both platforms, the VM is more convenient because you can start a VM WAY faster than you can reboot a system, it doesn't interrupt your work on the host, and you can run both at once.

While there's a lot of nerd rage about ads and such, please remember that tons of people use things like Android phones and Gmail. People are used to ads, they just don't get that fussed over them by and large.
 
At my office I use a Ryzen 5700G, and thanks to the changing hardware requirements for Win11 I no longer get spammed with do you want to upgrade to 11 ads. Instead Windows thinks a 5700G on an X570 board with 32GB of RAM and a Samsung 980 pro SSD does not meet basic requirements.
sounds like you just clicked the "not interested" button. your system is fully supported by w11.
 
In an ideal world I would hope for Microsoft to see this and think maybe they should alter their behavior, but I doubt that will happen. Its particularly noteworthy that Microsoft seems to be making more and more software exclusive to Win11, including major system features such as (if its still correct, it used to be 11 exclusive anyway) the Thread Director update required in the scheduler to function properly with Intel CPUs with P/E cores, AMD heterogeneous 3D Cache setups especially 2 CCD, and to a lesser degree anything over 8C/16T. There are a litany of other hardware and software features including certain TPM 2.0 asset storage verification, many applications and functions (including the apparently ill fated Windows Subsystem for Android which is being discontinued for the stupidest reason possible in that MS doesn't have their own bloody app store and thereby uses Amazon AppStore as a required platform for WSA, so apparently MS has gotten all huffy about their inability to monetize Android apps on Windows devices and are done with the whole thing) , along with other possible assets. In the relatively recent past, I can't think of nearly the amount of core and/ore desired features that were a major factor in upgrading (especially for home users) save for perhaps DirectX which had certain versions release on various OS platforms (some of which could often be backported officially or otherwise), there wasn't as much else.

Win11 having a relatively significant amount of both core features and questionably valuable stuff like ad platforms, AI assistants and more is noteworthy as users continue to be concerned by its obnoxious , opaque, and for many increasingly intrusive "features" that seem to make it quite clear that MS doesn't see Windows so much as an operating system for its users, but as a marketing and monetization platform for whatever buzzwords are thought to be profiteer-worthy. MS is not new to this behavior, such as the "Mobile/consolization" focus during the Windows 8.x era and Windows Phone era, but it was not welcomed then and certainly doesn't seem to be now. With the continue maturity of Linux, I am hoping that many of those frustrated with behavior of Windows will be able to switch with less consternation along the way, but while this does seem to be happening at a higher rate than ever before, there are also many who will stay on Win10 until they get a new PC and/or something requires it. Greater Linux adoption is always a good thing though for the foreseeable future, especially when such users are choosing it because they understand the value that Linux's openness, customization potential, privacy, and design in service to empowering the user is desirable. However, if they're just fed up with certain stuff and it brings them away from Win11 and to Linux that's still a move in the right direction if they're pleased with the outcome - the other benefits of the platform they can discover along the way.

In any event, MS have to start deciding the future for Windows and I fear it will become increasingly some sort of SAAS or or advertising platform to hawk apps and demo their new tech of the month (they didn't even keep Cortana labeling for the new CoPilot AI assistant thing etc) where those not on enterprise versions heavily configured are more valued for their "engagement" on the platform than anything else.
 
If the option to extend Win10 support past October 2025 is cheap enough for individual users, I might just stick with it. Have a long time yet before I have to worry about it.
 
I'm old enough to remember the rage about windows 10 and how it sucked so badly no one would ever switch to it from windows 7... As well as every other windows version in existence going back.

People are switching because they have to, no necessarily because they want to. I’d wager you’d still have a solid number of people who will tell you they’d still be on 7 if it still received security and vulnerability updates.
 
It's always what happens with Windows. Most people are real apathetic about upgrades so it doesn't happen until it is forced or happens naturally through attrition.

Funny thing is, same shit happens with Linux a lot too. You don't tend to see it in reporting since it usually all gets folded in to one "Linux" category but we see it at work all the time. For the systems we don't manage students will install generally the latest Ubutnu LTS and then never upgrade it to a newer one. Plenty of the time they won't even let it patch itself for security updates.

Sysadmins can be really bad about it too. Every time I've talked to one of our vendors for support they are always happy that our stuff is on the latest patch because it is easier to support. I asked NetApp about it once and the guy said "You have no idea, we get so many people running versions long out of support with tons of issues."

It's just human nature. People get something that works and then don't want to spend any effort to change, or even will spend some effort to block change.
What is upgraded in W11 compared to 10 for the average user?
 
People are switching because they have to, no necessarily because they want to. I’d wager you’d still have a solid number of people who will tell you they’d still be on 7 if it still received security and vulnerability updates.
That would be me :). Yeah I gave up and moved to 10 but I still to this day find 7 worked better than 10 and more logically. I find win 10 only mildly hostile, while I find 11 a complete hostile work environment especially with the TPM requirement that I disable on purpose. I am moving to Linux and honestly it was Valve that gave me the push with the steam deck. The only reason I haven't already moved over is I still have some programs I use daily like Directory Opus that have no equivalent that I like on Linux. Yeah they have various file managers on linux but they all suck IMHO and I am loath to use it after literally years of customizing directory opus with custom utilities/scripts/GUI customization/etc that I can probably replicate certain parts of in linux as bash scripts but uggh I really don't want to.
 
I'm old enough to remember the rage about windows 10 and how it sucked so badly no one would ever switch to it from windows 7... As well as every other windows version in existence going back.
You forgot about Windows 8.0! It was Windows 8.0 that got me to switch to Linux as my main OS. I now have a Windows VM, mostly for the games that won't work under Linux.
 
my work laptop is going to get upgraded to 11 soon.....I am not wanting that. Guaruntee it blows up everything and I DO NOT want the stupid useless 11 task bar.....I have way to much stuff open for that piece of garbage to handle.

I've had no issues with any windows releases ( inever used 8) but 11...it just a whole new level of garbage over any previous version.
 
Windows 11 isn't that terrible, but Microsoft is definitely keeping up its tradition of swinging between great and mediocre OS releases since Windows 98. By that token I suspect Windows 12 will be amazing.
 
Windows 11 isn't that terrible, but Microsoft is definitely keeping up its tradition of swinging between great and mediocre OS releases since Windows 98. By that token I suspect Windows 12 will be amazing.
But will probably be hated at first for a year or two
 
What is upgraded in W11 compared to 10 for the average user?
For me the difference is:

-with dual screens, W11 can only open calendar on the main screen, in W10 both screens worked
-file explorer is slower than windows 95 on a crappy old HDD, thanks to all those onedrive integrations making it heavy as hell
+AI calendar thingy where you can type "appointment tomorrow at 13" and it makes the marking
 
At my office I use a Ryzen 5700G, and thanks to the changing hardware requirements for Win11 I no longer get spammed with do you want to upgrade to 11 ads. Instead Windows thinks a 5700G on an X570 board with 32GB of RAM and a Samsung 980 pro SSD does not meet basic requirements.
Users in my office don’t get W11 notifications because I set the target version of Windows in Windows Update GPO to the last version of W10.

We will have to migrate to W11 by the time W10 goes EoS, because we’re not going to pay for extended support. There may also be a cyber security insurance consideration.
 
I haven't noticed anything breaking, it is working. Not sure if it's blocking everything.

If I were Microsoft I'd probably have a fallback to one or more static IP's to circumvent this type of blocking.

And I'm not even an IT pro, so if I can think of that, they probably can too.

But every little bit helps I guess.
 
sounds like you just clicked the "not interested" button. your system is fully supported by w11.
Nope. Now that I am back in the office, I just went to Windows Update via the start menu and while Windows has informed me that my copy of 10 Pro is up to date, the Win 11 dialogue box contains the following: "[t]his PC doesn't currently meet the the minimum system requirements to run Windows 11 Get the details and see if there are things you can do in the PC Health Check app."

Windows 11 isn't that terrible, but Microsoft is definitely keeping up its tradition of swinging between great and mediocre OS releases since Windows 98. By that token I suspect Windows 12 will be amazing.

That would imply Windows 10 is "great." Unfortunately, 10 is hot garbage compared to 7. Although with the increasing age of both OS releases I should maybe describe it as still-somewhat-warm garbage. The last "great" version of Windows was 7 which at least felt like it had more pros than cons compared to XP.
 
Users in my office don’t get W11 notifications because I set the target version of Windows in Windows Update GPO to the last version of W10.

We will have to migrate to W11 by the time W10 goes EoS, because we’re not going to pay for extended support. There may also be a cyber security insurance consideration.
If you configure Intune and enroll the machines there via GPO you can configure a profile that blocks all that too as well as many other things that GPO’s just don’t even have the options for. Microsoft has not kept up on adding their new “features” into Group Policy I’m guessing to force users into Intune to actually do what we need to on Win 11 and even some Win 10 stuff but yeah.

They are low key strong arming us into Intune as a replacement to GP.
 
Back
Top