Windows 10 Setup Question

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1Wolf

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Building a gaming machine for my wife. This is the first time that I've installed Windows 10 (My last build for her was many years ago and was Windows 7).

On previous machines I'd just created her Windows local account as an "Admin" so that she could do what she needed to do. However, this time around in the world of Windows 10 I've read that its better to set her up as a "standard" user instead of an admin and that way when she needs to do something she can just enter the password. I've read that this isn't overly intrusive and won't effect her gaming experience or use of the PC. I'm guessing then that I should create a 2nd "Admin" account with full admin rights.

I just wanted to get some opinions from folks who know better than me and see if this all sounds correct to you? And this is how folks are doing it now? Or whether, for gaming machines, most of you are just doing like I used to and creating just one account as an "Admin" user and calling it good.

What is best?
 

pendragon1

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Building a gaming machine for my wife. This is the first time that I've installed Windows 10 (My last build for her was many years ago and was Windows 7).

On previous machines I'd just created her Windows local account as an "Admin" so that she could do what she needed to do. However, this time around in the world of Windows 10 I've read that its better to set her up as a "standard" user instead of an admin and that way when she needs to do something she can just enter the password. I've read that this isn't overly intrusive and won't effect her gaming experience or use of the PC. I'm guessing then that I should create a 2nd "Admin" account with full admin rights.

I just wanted to get some opinions from folks who know better than me and see if this all sounds correct to you? And this is how folks are doing it now? Or whether, for gaming machines, most of you are just doing like I used to and creating just one account as an "Admin" user and calling it good.

What is best?
when you install, dont connect to the internet so you can make an offline account. when you get to account setup there will be a "i dont have internet" hotlink in the bottom left, click that then "setup local account"(i think) and it will create a local, non MS, account with admin. you can then, if you want, create a new standard user that will need admin creds to install things. your call, i have only used admin(with and without uac) accounts for years and years without the issues people say will inevitably happen...
 

1Wolf

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when you install, dont connect to the internet so you can make an offline account. when you get to account setup there will be a "i dont have internet" hotlink in the bottom left, click that then "setup local account"(i think) and it will create a local, non MS, account with admin. you can then, if you want, create a new standard user that will need admin creds to install things. your call, i have only used admin(with and without uac) accounts for years and years without the issues people say will inevitably happen...
Thanks :) Yup. That is exactly what I'd done. I'd created her a local non-MS admin account. That was my question: Whether or not folks were still doing that...just creating a non-MS admin account as a "main" account and thats it (like I'd always done on previous machines and previous versions of windows) or if they were creating a "standard" non-MS account for their "Main" account and then creating a separate non-MS "admin" account that they'd only log into when they needed to do admin stuff.

Like you, I'd only ever used an admin account as my "main" account for years and had no issues. However, I was trying to determine if the majority of gamer folks were doing it differently now and using a standard account as their "main" account instead.
 

OFaceSIG

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Thanks :) Yup. That is exactly what I'd done. I'd created her a local non-MS admin account. That was my question: Whether or not folks were still doing that...just creating a non-MS admin account as a "main" account and thats it (like I'd always done on previous machines and previous versions of windows) or if they were creating a "standard" non-MS account for their "Main" account and then creating a separate non-MS "admin" account that they'd only log into when they needed to do admin stuff.

Like you, I'd only ever used an admin account as my "main" account for years and had no issues. However, I was trying to determine if the majority of gamer folks were doing it differently now and using a standard account as their "main" account instead.
For someone who regulary destroys machines by clicking russian goat porn sites or malware spam links the standard account is a good idea. However for someone relatively sane who can use Windows w/o breaking it, admin is fine.
 

B00nie

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For someone who regulary destroys machines by clicking russian goat porn sites or malware spam links the standard account is a good idea. However for someone relatively sane who can use Windows w/o breaking it, admin is fine.
You can get a fly-by infection from any website through a malicious ad. Running as admin is never recommended.
 

schizrade

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You can get a fly-by infection from any website through a malicious ad. Running as admin is never recommended.
Yeah, don't do that. Just run as a regular user and enter a PW/Biometric when needed.
 

B00nie

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how about people let people run things the way they want and if you dont use windows or cannot provide any advice other than switch os, skip the thread...
How about getting down from your soap box.
a) You're dead wrong
b) He asked for setup advice.
 

ManofGod

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Building a gaming machine for my wife. This is the first time that I've installed Windows 10 (My last build for her was many years ago and was Windows 7).

On previous machines I'd just created her Windows local account as an "Admin" so that she could do what she needed to do. However, this time around in the world of Windows 10 I've read that its better to set her up as a "standard" user instead of an admin and that way when she needs to do something she can just enter the password. I've read that this isn't overly intrusive and won't effect her gaming experience or use of the PC. I'm guessing then that I should create a 2nd "Admin" account with full admin rights.

I just wanted to get some opinions from folks who know better than me and see if this all sounds correct to you? And this is how folks are doing it now? Or whether, for gaming machines, most of you are just doing like I used to and creating just one account as an "Admin" user and calling it good.

What is best?

It is what I do and no more difficult or obvious than when I use my daily driver Linux install. The only issue is, if you want things like Afterburner to auto start on log in, you will need to create a task to do so.
 
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ManofGod

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You can get a fly-by infection from any website through a malicious ad. Running as admin is never recommended.

That is why running sudo or as su is something that should be kept to a minumum.
 

B00nie

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That is why running sudo or as su is something that should be kept to a minumum.
Having to resort to running sudo means automatically that you're not the root (admin) user :)
Unlike Windows, linux doesn't require sudo for everything trivial like Windows UAC does. But as we know, UAC was never meant to be a security tool but to annoy developers enough to adhere to development guidelines.
 

CAD4466HK

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when you install, dont connect to the internet so you can make an offline account. when you get to account setup there will be a "i dont have internet" hotlink in the bottom left, click that then "setup local account"(i think) and it will create a local, non MS, account with admin. you can then, if you want, create a new standard user that will need admin creds to install things. your call, i have only used admin(with and without uac) accounts for years and years without the issues people say will inevitably happen...

With the newest media creation tool, you no longer have to do the no internet thing to make an offline account.
I installed 10, 3 times this week using this method.

 

B00nie

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A) opinions and assholes

B) the advice was already given in a step by step manner for the relavent OS.

You just carpet bomb threads.
It's not an opinion but a technical fact. People like you are why Windows users get owned every day lol.
 

pendragon1

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With the newest media creation tool, you no longer have to do the no internet thing to make an offline account.
I installed 10, 3 times this week using this method.

on pro/edu/ent you get the option online or off, but home still has to be disconnected, afaik....
 

Aireoth

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It's not an opinion but a technical fact. People like you are why Windows users get owned every day lol.
ugh, you listen to nothing, it was literally posted above to install and create a non-admin account as the operating user. Comeon dumbass.
 

B00nie

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ugh, you listen to nothing, it was literally posted above to install and create a non-admin account as the operating user. Comeon dumbass.
I replied to pendragon/Oface, dumbass. Learn to read.
 

DeaconFrost

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My wife and I created outlook.com accounts for use with our home systems and nothing else. The PIN requirements are getting more difficult to disable, but that's really my only gripe with Windows 10 now. My wife has local admin rights on her two computers mainly because she's capable of not being an idiot user and I don't feel like having to install anything and everything for her.
 

B00nie

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And they already posted your suggestion before you even joined the thread, so maybe pull your head out?
And they refuted the suggestion after that. What's so hard to understand? You're just inciting argument out of spite.
 

1Wolf

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Thanks to everyone for your help, opinions, and advice. I also wanted to apologize to everyone who chimed in here as I certainly didn't mean to start an argument. I didn't realize "admin" versus "standard user" was a touchy subject with such strong opinions. I had no idea. I also think there was some miscommunication as I already knew full well how to create Admin and/or Standard Accounts and I knew how to make them local accounts instead of microsoft accounts. My question was really just about what the rest of the community here was doing and what their thoughts on the subject were. Whether you were running "admin" as many have us have done with many windows versions or whether these days most had switched to running a Standard account and just entering the pwd when they needed or logging in as Admin to take care of what you needed to take care of.

Personally, every machine I've built in the past I just created one account with admin rights as the "main" account and that was it. Regardless of whether it was me or my wife or a family member...all of our PC's were single user and just set up for one "main" account with admin rights. However, these new machines I'm building are our first Windows 10 machines and I just wasn't sure if I should do it the way I've always done or whether the majority of the community was going the "standard account" combined with an "admin account" way.

There wasn't any right or wrong answer to this thread. It was your opinions and reasons I was interested in. Thanks to everyone who chimed in and offered their opinion. When folks get Snarky on such things is when some other folks don't want to wade into the fight and post their thoughts and thats unfortunate because often its those folks who don't want to argue - they just want to help...and they often have the most valuable opinions. I truly apologize if this thread ruffled any feathers. If I'd worded the initial question better I think that any arguments could have been avoided.

Thanks again to everyone who offered their help and opinions :)
 

B00nie

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Thanks to everyone for your help, opinions, and advice. I also wanted to apologize to everyone who chimed in here as I certainly didn't mean to start an argument. I didn't realize "admin" versus "standard user" was a touchy subject with such strong opinions. I had no idea.
It shouldn't be because there is only the right and the wrong way. Admin user is the wrong way - but since windows users are so lazy that they prefer to get pup / ransomware / malware / viruses instead of having to type their password once in a while, some think it's the right thing to do. Hilarious actually. Of course while you use Windows being a regular user is only an annoyance to the attacker, there usually are ways to escalate the attacks and own the box anyway. But at least being non admin makes it a tad harder. It's like running antivirus - won't stop all the attacks but will stop at least some of them.
 

pendragon1

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It shouldn't be because there is only the right and the wrong way. Admin user is the wrong way - but since windows users are so lazy that they prefer to get pup / ransomware / malware / viruses instead of having to type their password once in a while, some think it's the right thing to do. Hilarious actually. Of course while you use Windows being a regular user is only an annoyance to the attacker, there usually are ways to escalate the attacks and own the box anyway. But at least being non admin makes it a tad harder. It's like running antivirus - won't stop all the attacks but will stop at least some of them.
would you just give it up already. you think im on a high horse yet spout shit like this. get over yourself ffs.
 

Zedicus

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It shouldn't be because there is only the right and the wrong way. Admin user is the wrong way - but since windows users are so lazy that they prefer to get pup / ransomware / malware / viruses instead of having to type their password once in a while, some think it's the right thing to do. Hilarious actually. Of course while you use Windows being a regular user is only an annoyance to the attacker, there usually are ways to escalate the attacks and own the box anyway. But at least being non admin makes it a tad harder. It's like running antivirus - won't stop all the attacks but will stop at least some of them.
all i could think was
Screen_Shot_2017-11-06_at_12.41.31_PM.png
 

michalrz

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I generally try to adhere to the principle of least privilege even if it's just to ease my mind somewhat.
As a limited/standard user you can still have, say, your browser compromised and your passwords captured.
To answer your question, I never really had any serious issues with running standard non-admin accounts ever since Win 7.
And yes, you do still need a full admin account to escalate yourself to in order to do stuff.
 

LukeTbk

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It shouldn't be because there is only the right and the wrong way. Admin user is the wrong way - but since windows users are so lazy that they prefer to get pup / ransomware / malware / viruses instead of having to type their password once in a while, some think it's the right thing to do. Hilarious actually.
And because it is so well known, you do not have really full admin rights all the time just because you have an admin account either I feel like
 
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