Who else annoyed with Apple obsoleting your device?

Smashed Ixnay

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They'll be good for at least another year in terms of major updates, and I imagine they'll get minor releases right up until iOS 15 (conveniently, two years from now).

Thanks. I should have just got them the 8s for a little extra a month. I came from LG/Samsung, and I praise Apple for supporting older devices for quite some time. After two years any Android phone I had seemed like it was no longer supported. There are things I miss from Android, but this is one thing I love Apple for.
 

Zarathustra[H]

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As far as I see it, phone technology has a two year practical life span from the initial launch date.

Any time you get after that, consider yourselves lucky.
 

AltTabbins

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As far as I see it, phone technology has a two year practical life span from the initial launch date.

Any time you get after that, consider yourselves lucky.

I think that is more for android phones. 2 year old iPhones are still very much supported.
 

Trimlock

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As far as I see it, phone technology has a two year practical life span from the initial launch date.

Any time you get after that, consider yourselves lucky.
Maybe for Android but every iPhone that’s been in my family has lived longer than 2 years. Our shortest was the 5S, because the lifeproof case leaked.
 

ssj925

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Yeah Android is a mess. I've owned mostly Samsung phones. It gets complicated...you have the actual update from Samsung themselves, then you have to wait by region, then by carrier to finally get the update.

On iPhone it's same day everywhere, every device.

My Note 10+ was released August this year and still doesn't have the latest Android version that was released officially by Google on Sep 3. Rumor has it, we're getting the update next year in January but I still have to wait for my carrier unless I flash a different firmware.

My iPhone 8 Plus is running the latest iOS released 2 weeks ago and that phone is 2 years old.
 

Shoganai

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I have an iPhone 6 plus with 64gb I got new in 2014. Works perfectly fine, only has a few minor dings on the body and no scratches on the glass. And now Apple no longer wants to update it forcing me to count the days until one of my apps do not work on it. I will probably be getting an 11 soon just to have to count another 4-5 years. :rolleyes:
Not sure what you mean. The iPhone 6 Plus still gets iOS 13. They support older phones three times longer than any other phone competitor. If you went to Android you’ll be even more pissed off. Even my iPhone SE that I’m on right now as a back up as I wait for my new phone to arrive today is running buttery smooth on iOS 13.
 

Aurelius

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Not sure what you mean. The iPhone 6 Plus still gets iOS 13. They support older phones three times longer than any other phone competitor. If you went to Android you’ll be even more pissed off. Even my iPhone SE that I’m on right now as a back up as I wait for my new phone to arrive today is running buttery smooth on iOS 13.

The iPhone 6 series stopped getting releases after iOS 12 -- you may be thinking of the iPhone 6s, which shares the same underlying guts as your iPhone SE.

All the same, you're right that Flybye would be downright fuming if they moved to Android and realized that they'd get two major updates if they're lucky.
 

Shoganai

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The iPhone 6 series stopped getting releases after iOS 12 -- you may be thinking of the iPhone 6s, which shares the same underlying guts as your iPhone SE.

All the same, you're right that Flybye would be downright fuming if they moved to Android and realized that they'd get two major updates if they're lucky.
You’re right, I was thinking of the S version. The regular 6 is boned, but that’s because Apple finally ditched the 32-bit architecture. Still sucks though. But yeah ... Android updates are laughable by comparison.
 

Justintoxicated

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You’re right, I was thinking of the S version. The regular 6 is boned, but that’s because Apple finally ditched the 32-bit architecture. Still sucks though. But yeah ... Android updates are laughable by comparison.
Really?
https://www.thesun.co.uk/tech/76331...controversial-performance-management-feature/

https://www.vox.com/2017/12/22/16807056/apple-slow-iphone-batteries

Ssounds like 1/2 assed support to me.

Android (well google) is about 3 years but sometimes longer, the phone will keep working on an older operating systems they just don't get the major updates so they won't get slowed down.
 

Aurelius

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Really?
https://www.thesun.co.uk/tech/76331...controversial-performance-management-feature/

https://www.vox.com/2017/12/22/16807056/apple-slow-iphone-batteries

Ssounds like 1/2 assed support to me.

Android (well google) is about 3 years but sometimes longer, the phone will keep working on an older operating systems they just don't get the major updates so they won't get slowed down.

Oh, please, not this crap again.

Apple does that to keep the phone working for as long as possible when the battery has been worn out. You know, so that you can keep using it without feeling forced to upgrade. It should have given people an option to turn off the throttling right from the start, but at least it was thinking about protecting the phone instead of simply leaving you to twist in the wind... you know, like what happens with Android. And hey, with Android vendors like Samsung you'll see OS-related slowdowns after as little as a year -- how courteous of them!

And no, Android update support is not "sometimes longer" than three years. Google doesn't provide major feature updates for more than two years, and doesn't offer security updates for longer than three years (even on its own phones). So you're already starting to run into software obsolescence after two years, even if Google Play Services prevents the cutoff from being as sharp as it would otherwise.

I'll use an anecdote as an example of what I mean (I know anecdotes aren't wholly representative, but it's a textbook case). My parents' iPhone 6 units were still performing well and fully updated five years after purchase, and they only upgraded to the iPhone 11 because they wanted to remain reasonably current knowing that iOS 12.4 was as far as they went. I fully believe they'll keep their current phones until 2024. If they'd had Android phones, they'd have needed to upgrade at least once more in that five-year span to keep up with feature and security updates, and there's a real chance they'd have felt the pain of update-related slowdowns before those replacement phones arrived.

Conversely, there's the Essential Phone I have as a side device. Now, Essential has been pretty good about OS updates, bringing me up to Android 10 and delivering monthly security updates without fail, but I know I won't get a major OS revision past 10 and that security updates will likely stop in late summer or early fall of next year. It's had performance issues for half of its roughly two-year lifespan. While the OS is normally fast enough, it occasionally bogs down and develops seemingly inexplicable delays that won't clear up until after a reboot. I'm sure this doesn't happen to everyone, but if this were an iPhone, it'd still be performing about as well as the day I bought it.
 
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Justintoxicated

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Oh, please, not this crap again.

Apple does that to keep the phone working for as long as possible when the battery has been worn out. You know, so that you can keep using it without feeling forced to upgrade. It should have given people an option to turn off the throttling right from the start, but at least it was thinking about protecting the phone instead of simply leaving you to twist in the wind... you know, like what happens with Android. And hey, with Android vendors like Samsung you'll see OS-related slowdowns after as little as a year -- how courteous of them!

And no, Android update support is not "sometimes longer" than three years. Google doesn't provide major feature updates for more than two years, and doesn't offer security updates for longer than three years (even on its own phones). So you're already starting to run into software obsolescence after two years, even if Google Play Services prevents the cutoff from being as sharp as it would otherwise.

I'll use an anecdote as an example of what I mean (I know anecdotes aren't wholly representative, but it's a textbook case). My parents' iPhone 6 units were still performing well and fully updated five years after purchase, and they only upgraded to the iPhone 11 because they wanted to remain reasonably current knowing that iOS 12.4 was as far as they went. I fully believe they'll keep their current phones until 2024. If they'd had Android phones, they'd have needed to upgrade at least once more in that five-year span to keep up with feature and security updates, and there's a real chance they'd have felt the pain of update-related slowdowns before those replacement phones arrived.

Conversely, there's the Essential Phone I have as a side device. Now, Essential has been pretty good about OS updates, bringing me up to Android 10 and delivering monthly security updates without fail, but I know I won't get a major OS revision past 10 and that security updates will likely stop in late summer or early fall of next year. It's had performance issues for half of its roughly two-year lifespan. While the OS is normally fast enough, it occasionally bogs down and develops seemingly inexplicable delays that won't clear up until after a reboot. I'm sure this doesn't happen to everyone, but if this were an iPhone, it'd still be performing about as well as the day I bought it.

I dunno people at work were frustrated by this and bought new iPhones.

I'm still getting updates for my pixel 2xl and it's been over 2 years..

Are iphone batteries really that much more advanced than Android batteries? The new iPhone looks great but I don't want to get involved in that ecosystem. Not a fan of throw away laptop's (can't replace batteries, update hard drives it memory) but it's interesting how they hold their value... What would it be like having an iPhone and removing yourself from the rest of the ecosystem?

Can you simply move movies and music to your iPhone like you can on Android or do you have to use itunes still? can you steam music and video off your home server or only if your home server is a mac?

Im thinking best bet is to get my Dad to buy an iphone because Android seems too complex for him then maybe I can see how that goes for him.

I only know one person at work who went Android to iphone and his assessment was that he would go back to Android but his parents keep buying him iPhones so they can communicate with apps that are part of the apple Eco system. And well free phones are the best phones.

Mom went the other way some years ago and she stayed with apple. If course now they have macbooks too, but I don't think they really do more than browse the web with them.
 
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Trimlock

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People were frustrated before because the phone would auto boot down if the battery was that bad. Apples update made it so those phones still functioned. They were only guilty of having poor communication skills for that update.

Apple batteries are the same as everyone’s else, their technology to preserve the battery is better than everyone else’s.

you don’t have to live in Apples ecosystem, sure you are locked down to apps in the Apples App Store but you aren’t forced to use Apple proprietary software.

iTunes isn’t required for anything other than local backups.

iPhones communicate just fine to android, there is no justification (other than quality) to pick iPhone to iPhone communication.
 

Justintoxicated

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People were frustrated before because the phone would auto boot down if the battery was that bad. Apples update made it so those phones still functioned. They were only guilty of having poor communication skills for that update.

Apple batteries are the same as everyone’s else, their technology to preserve the battery is better than everyone else’s.

you don’t have to live in Apples ecosystem, sure you are locked down to apps in the Apples App Store but you aren’t forced to use Apple proprietary software.

iTunes isn’t required for anything other than local backups.

iPhones communicate just fine to android, there is no justification (other than quality) to pick iPhone to iPhone communication.
When your taking about batteries are you just referring to the phones?

Friend is asking how to limit laptop charging level to 80% to preserve his battery on his laptop like I do with my Lenovo (although the laptop battery can be replaced at home, I like my stuff to last). Do the phones let you do this? I know my Android phone does not so i have it just alert me when the battery is over 80% charge so I can unplug it if I'm not sleeping etc. It's unfortunate i can't tell it to stop charging at that level. If iphone does this I may switch after my pixel 4. Preventing 100% charge and low discharge is critical to battery lifespan.

Screenshot_20191208-153957.png
Screenshot_20191208-154135.png

Annoying have similar statistics for their iphone?

z just curious since the claim of superior batteries had been made.
 
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Trimlock

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When your taking about batteries are you just referring to the phones?

Friend is asking how to limit laptop charging level to 80% to preserve his battery on his laptop like I do with my Lenovo (although the laptop battery can be replaced at home, I like my stuff to last). Do the phones let you do this? I know my Android phone does not so i have it just alert me when the battery is over 80% charge so I can unplug it if I'm not sleeping etc. It's unfortunate i can't tell it to stop charging at that level. If iphone does this I may switch after my pixel 4. Preventing 100% charge and low discharge is critical to battery lifespan.

View attachment 205555
View attachment 205556

Annoying have similar statistics for their iphone?

z just curious since the claim of superior batteries had been made.

samsung makes a majority of their batteries, most batteries actually. Superior comes from the protection and preventing the chipset from overdrawing on the battery, iOS has a gauge on how healthy the battery is and limits the voltage draw from the battery thus increasing the life of the battery.

the protection on lithium batteries already prevents the last 20% charge, I don’t know what laptops do to prevent over charge but as far as I’m aware cellsphones have always only charged up to 80%. That 100% indication just means your phone is as charged as they will allow it. If you leave the battery partially charged you are essentially ruining those cells. It is recommended to charge at 100% and keep it there.

As to your question about if iOS lets you do this, I am not aware of a way to do it.
 

ChronoReverse

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iOS 13 has a feature called optimized battery charging that (allegedly) learns your charging habits so that if you plug it in before sleeping, it’ll keep from charging to 100%, holding at something lower until nearly the time for you to wake whereupon it’ll full charge to 100% a bit before you wake up. The theory being holding charge at 100% is worse than a topping to 100% and then going down from use.

My iPhone 11 has such great battery life that I just don’t charge before I sleep. Instead i just quick charge it to whatever while getting ready to leave for work and whatever charge it’s at (usually 80%) is more than enough to get me through the day.
 

Justintoxicated

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Yes the longer at 100% the harder it is on the battery, but charging to under 100% is even better. That's a great feature to have on the iPhone though.
 
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Justintoxicated

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samsung makes a majority of their batteries, most batteries actually. Superior comes from the protection and preventing the chipset from overdrawing on the battery, iOS has a gauge on how healthy the battery is and limits the voltage draw from the battery thus increasing the life of the battery.

the protection on lithium batteries already prevents the last 20% charge, I don’t know what laptops do to prevent over charge but as far as I’m aware cellsphones have always only charged up to 80%. That 100% indication just means your phone is as charged as they will allow it. If you leave the battery partially charged you are essentially ruining those cells. It is recommended to charge at 100% and keep it there.

As to your question about if iOS lets you do this, I am not aware of a way to do it.

Not sure I believe this, do you have a source?
Partially charging won't hurt lithium batteries either.
 

Justintoxicated

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samsung makes a majority of their batteries, most batteries actually. Superior comes from the protection and preventing the chipset from overdrawing on the battery, iOS has a gauge on how healthy the battery is and limits the voltage draw from the battery thus increasing the life of the battery.

the protection on lithium batteries already prevents the last 20% charge, I don’t know what laptops do to prevent over charge but as far as I’m aware cellsphones have always only charged up to 80%. That 100% indication just means your phone is as charged as they will allow it. If you leave the battery partially charged you are essentially ruining those cells. It is recommended to charge at 100% and keep it there.

As to your question about if iOS lets you do this, I am not aware of a way to do it.

Not sure I believe this, do you have a source?

Limiting draw is called throttling and keep things from getting too hot. However throttling reduces performance. It's an issue with Macs because they don't have active cooling.
 

Shoganai

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Aurelius

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I dunno people at work were frustrated by this and bought new iPhones.

I'm still getting updates for my pixel 2xl and it's been over 2 years..

Are iphone batteries really that much more advanced than Android batteries? The new iPhone looks great but I don't want to get involved in that ecosystem. Not a fan of throw away laptop's (can't replace batteries, update hard drives it memory) but it's interesting how they hold their value... What would it be like having an iPhone and removing yourself from the rest of the ecosystem?

Can you simply move movies and music to your iPhone like you can on Android or do you have to use itunes still? can you steam music and video off your home server or only if your home server is a mac?

Im thinking best bet is to get my Dad to buy an iphone because Android seems too complex for him then maybe I can see how that goes for him.

I only know one person at work who went Android to iphone and his assessment was that he would go back to Android but his parents keep buying him iPhones so they can communicate with apps that are part of the apple Eco system. And well free phones are the best phones.

Mom went the other way some years ago and she stayed with apple. If course now they have macbooks too, but I don't think they really do more than browse the web with them.

Your Pixel 2XL got Android 10 because it was two years after release. You likely won't be getting Android 11 -- just Android 10 point releases and security updates until sometime in late summer or early fall.

It's not that iPhone batteries are more advanced, it's that iOS and Apple's A-series CPUs are generally more power-efficient. As for using an iPhone and nothing else in Apple's ecosystem? It's fine -- not as slick as living in Apple's universe, of course (that's what Apple would prefer), but you won't be gnashing your teeth. You have all the Google apps, all the Microsoft apps, every major media or cloud service... you're not really hurting for support, outside of perhaps some Pixel-specific features.

You still have to use iTunes for local media syncing. But it's nearly 2020 -- streaming services are much easier regardless of which platform you use. You can certainly use third-party apps to stream media from a home server. I'm not an expert on that front, but Plex and VLC are available.

If Android seems too daunting, an iPhone would likely be a good pick. Not that iPhones can't be power user tools, but there's a gentler learning curve. Just as long as your dad can wrap his head around basic navigation gestures (hey, Apple can always offer training at the store!).
 

Shoganai

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Your Pixel 2XL got Android 10 because it was two years after release. You likely won't be getting Android 11 -- just Android 10 point releases and security updates until sometime in late summer or early fall.

It's not that iPhone batteries are more advanced, it's that iOS and Apple's A-series CPUs are generally more power-efficient. As for using an iPhone and nothing else in Apple's ecosystem? It's fine -- not as slick as living in Apple's universe, of course (that's what Apple would prefer), but you won't be gnashing your teeth. You have all the Google apps, all the Microsoft apps, every major media or cloud service... you're not really hurting for support, outside of perhaps some Pixel-specific features.

You still have to use iTunes for local media syncing. But it's nearly 2020 -- streaming services are much easier regardless of which platform you use. You can certainly use third-party apps to stream media from a home server. I'm not an expert on that front, but Plex and VLC are available.

If Android seems too daunting, an iPhone would likely be a good pick. Not that iPhones can't be power user tools, but there's a gentler learning curve. Just as long as your dad can wrap his head around basic navigation gestures (hey, Apple can always offer training at the store!).
You can also root the Pixel quite easily and if updates run out, you can simply install the newest Android flavor with something like Cyanogen.
 

Justintoxicated

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Your Pixel 2XL got Android 10 because it was two years after release. You likely won't be getting Android 11 -- just Android 10 point releases and security updates until sometime in late summer or early fall.

It's not that iPhone batteries are more advanced, it's that iOS and Apple's A-series CPUs are generally more power-efficient. As for using an iPhone and nothing else in Apple's ecosystem? It's fine -- not as slick as living in Apple's universe, of course (that's what Apple would prefer), but you won't be gnashing your teeth. You have all the Google apps, all the Microsoft apps, every major media or cloud service... you're not really hurting for support, outside of perhaps some Pixel-specific features.

You still have to use iTunes for local media syncing. But it's nearly 2020 -- streaming services are much easier regardless of which platform you use. You can certainly use third-party apps to stream media from a home server. I'm not an expert on that front, but Plex and VLC are available.

If Android seems too daunting, an iPhone would likely be a good pick. Not that iPhones can't be power user tools, but there's a gentler learning curve. Just as long as your dad can wrap his head around basic navigation gestures (hey, Apple can always offer training at the store!).
Sounds like it would work well for my dad then.

For me I have lots of ripped mp3s I copy to my phone that I use while camping and at work. Lots of areas still have no coverage or poor signal so cloud playback is nice but not good enough for many circumstances.

I just open explorer and copy over any files or documents I want. Break down in my RzR in the middle of the dunes? No problem I'll pull up the shop manual bad get you the torque spec. Having trouble with your p2p radio, no problem I have that pdf installed locally too.

Locally music docs etc is also great while traveling abroad, service is often allot worse in other countries.
 

Aurelius

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You can also root the Pixel quite easily and if updates run out, you can simply install the newest Android flavor with something like Cyanogen.

True, but I always consider rooting something of a cop-out and something that no everyday user should have to do. It's an admission that Google has a poor support policy, and it has consequences for those apps that don't tolerate root (I know there are workarounds, but that just reinforces my point).
 

Aurelius

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Sounds like it would work well for my dad then.

For me I have lots of ripped mp3s I copy to my phone that I use while camping and at work. Lots of areas still have no coverage or poor signal so cloud playback is nice but not good enough for many circumstances.

I just open explorer and copy over any files or documents I want. Break down in my RzR in the middle of the dunes? No problem I'll pull up the shop manual bad get you the torque spec. Having trouble with your p2p radio, no problem I have that pdf installed locally too.

Locally music docs etc is also great while traveling abroad, service is often allot worse in other countries.

Something important to stress is that streaming media services frequently let you download content for offline viewing. You'd need to remember to save a whole bunch of albums or TV shows before a trip, but that can make sure you're covered when you're traveling.
 

Shoganai

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True, but I always consider rooting something of a cop-out and something that no everyday user should have to do. It's an admission that Google has a poor support policy, and it has consequences for those apps that don't tolerate root (I know there are workarounds, but that just reinforces my point).
It's something that I do on day one of getting a Google phone as I have I'm the past as some of my apps require root to function fully. I don't see it as a cop out. I see it as a pretty big advantage of Android.
 

Aurelius

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It's something that I do on day one of getting a Google phone as I have I'm the past as some of my apps require root to function fully. I don't see it as a cop out. I see it as a pretty big advantage of Android.

It is if you're a tinkering enthusiast and don't have apps that specifically forbid root. For everyone else, and that's the vast, vast majority of people on the planet, it's a cop-out.
 

Shoganai

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It is if you're a tinkering enthusiast and don't have apps that specifically forbid root. For everyone else, and that's the vast, vast majority of people on the planet, it's a cop-out.
None of the apps I've ever used forbid root. Google is also the only company, as far as I'm aware, that doesn't void your warranty if you root your phone. They provide longer updates than other other Android manufacturer ... so if you want to be mad at someone ... it should be literally everyone else. If you want longer update support ... Apple is the only option.
 

Justintoxicated

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You can also root the Pixel quite easily and if updates run out, you can simply install the newest Android flavor with something like Cyanogen.
Don't you lose some of the
True, but I always consider rooting something of a cop-out and something that no everyday user should have to do. It's an admission that Google has a poor support policy, and it has consequences for those apps that don't tolerate root (I know there are workarounds, but that just reinforces my point).
It's super easy to root a Google pixel phone
None of the apps I've ever used forbid root. Google is also the only company, as far as I'm aware, that doesn't void your warranty if you root your phone. They provide longer updates than other other Android manufacturer ... so if you want to be mad at someone ... it should be literally everyone else. If you want longer update support ... Apple is the only option.
Something important to stress is that streaming media services frequently let you download content for offline viewing. You'd need to remember to save a whole bunch of albums or TV shows before a trip, but that can make sure you're covered when you're traveling.
Thats true, since I usually don't need FLAC while camping etc. I guess I'm too old school for modern tech, I like to just drag and drop my music over, rather than flip through all the different streaming media apps. I do like spotify but don't always keep my subscription since it's kind of expensive just for music.
 

Shoganai

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I just stick a 512 GB MicroSDXC card when I'm out with all my movies and whatnot on it. And I use Kokotime to organize everything with metadata and cover art and whatnot. I'm really glad I'm back on Android. It's like having a laptop in my pocket.
 

UnknownSouljer

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Not sure I believe this, do you have a source?
Partially charging won't hurt lithium batteries either.

Old article but as far as I can tell, Apple hasn’t been using Samsung batteries since 2012.
https://techcrunch.com/2012/11/23/apple-reportedly-changes-battery-suppliers-as-samsung-walks/

And this article would suggest that at least the design and manufacturing process is made by Apple themselves. And then likely put into production by a third party.
https://www.wired.com/2015/03/apples-new-battery-tech/
 

Justintoxicated

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Easy for a tech enthusiast. Not an everyday user! And besides, this is still making excuses for Google when Apple simply does the right thing and offers longer, more consistent support.
There are a hell of allot less devices to support though.
 

Trimlock

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Easy for a tech enthusiast. Not an everyday user! And besides, this is still making excuses for Google when Apple simply does the right thing and offers longer, more consistent support.

i remember Google talking about removing Google Play access with rooted devices way back. Did this become a thing or was that only tied to Google Services?
 

Shoganai

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i remember Google talking about removing Google Play access with rooted devices way back. Did this become a thing or was that only tied to Google Services?
That's not a thing ... and I don't remember it ever being a thing ... and I've been rooting Google devices since the Nexus.
 

N4CR

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'Battery worn out so throw out the baby with the bath water' lol.. ffs.
I strapped 6000mAH on my 5? year old now V10 and it's doing perfectly fine.. 48-60+ hours between charges on moderate use? No new phone (other than the energiser brick) can even come close to that with their new process tech included, because they have even more shit running in the background on that process tech and shithouse sized batteries because slim is all they care about. I couldn't care less about updates and latest shiny UI. It works and does the phone thing it needs to do just fine, plus it has a courageous feature called a 3.5mm headphones jack with a great DAC built in. It also has this thing called an SD-Card slot, so I can control how much storage I want without paying some stupidly ridiculous markup with a cap on maximum size. I don't like many new phones from either side of the fence. They can mostly go die in a large lithium battery fire.

But in all seriousness, Apple does have best update support compared to Android. But Android has best user modding if you have a popular phone, which can significantly extend lifetimes. I had an SGS2 go 6-7 years because of the modding community adding newer Android versions.

Each has their strengths and weaknesses. Depends what you want to do.
 
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