what would cause a windows 10 reset to remove a large no. of application software?

vick1000

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Can you open the problem files in an app? This will determine why the file won't copy, whether it's corrupt, or windows is preventing the copy.
 

B00nie

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Win10 does not defrag SSDs, it issues a TRIM commmand.
That's not what people wrote here earlier. Something to do with running out of file descriptors when NTFS gets too fragmented. Microsoft apparently lost the people who they bought NTFS from so they can't upgrade it and the WinFS farce doesn't give much hope either.
 

Lunas

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I haven't seen Apple remove yet any of my applications without a warning. Support for 32-bit apps was stopped but there were warnings for a year before that.
im not talking osx i am referring to ios
 

B00nie

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im not talking osx i am referring to ios
iOS is not a desktop operating system to start with. Second, iOS terms of use state that Apple may remove applications that they deem harmful for the system. This is essential to keep the iOS device safe. Phones should be locked, computers not.
 

Happy Hopping

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Can you open the problem files in an app? This will determine why the file won't copy, whether it's corrupt, or windows is preventing the copy.
during these file corruption, (or lost of files), I use simply file copying software, total commander, it will copy the first x no. of files, then lock up. Once lock up, I can't close that application, and have to re-boot.
 

Nobu

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I had a similar issue copying files off my ssd when it started failing. Was using rsync, since it won't copy files you already copied and can verify the copies. It would stop, and I'd have to reboot and start it again, but eventually I got most of my files off. A big PITA for sure.
 
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Lunas

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iOS is not a desktop operating system to start with. Second, iOS terms of use state that Apple may remove applications that they deem harmful for the system. This is essential to keep the iOS device safe. Phones should be locked, computers not.
i see your text but your point is moot and has nothing to do with this situation. Nobody reads the terms of use even the courts have said they are not enforceable. I was relating that win 10 removing apps not compatible with certain point releases was something i had only seen in ios going from one older version to a newer one. That said I could see OSX doing the same thing too but then again the install base and array of software is so limited the number of occurrences is probably low
 

B00nie

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i see your text but your point is moot and has nothing to do with this situation. Nobody reads the terms of use even the courts have said they are not enforceable. I was relating that win 10 removing apps not compatible with certain point releases was something i had only seen in ios going from one older version to a newer one. That said I could see OSX doing the same thing too but then again the install base and array of software is so limited the number of occurrences is probably low
It's apparent that you have no knowledge how developing on Apple ecostructure happens. When a developer registers as an iOS app developer, he agrees to adhere to Apple development guidelines and his code is reviewed before it's accepted for publishing. This process takes typically about 2 weeks. It doesn't work like Windows or Google Play store where anyone can publish any sort of shit they want. So when apps get pulled, they get pulled due to violating the rules. Simple as that.

Coincidentally this method of working as made the iPhone the number one safest platforms available. I would never want to own an Android phone for the aforementioned reasons.
 

Lunas

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It's apparent that you have no knowledge how developing on Apple ecostructure happens. When a developer registers as an iOS app developer, he agrees to adhere to Apple development guidelines and his code is reviewed before it's accepted for publishing. This process takes typically about 2 weeks. It doesn't work like Windows or Google Play store where anyone can publish any sort of shit they want. So when apps get pulled, they get pulled due to violating the rules. Simple as that.

Coincidentally this method of working as made the iPhone the number one safest platforms available. I would never want to own an Android phone for the aforementioned reasons.
it seems you have no idea how the google play store or microsoft store work either... I never claimed to be a dev only a user and from my use of apple products and how ios treated me i'll tell you this all 3 platforms are the same google play store has the same process for getting on google play. all 3 of them get trash the difference is the system running them.
 

B00nie

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it seems you have no idea how the google play store or microsoft store work either... I never claimed to be a dev only a user and from my use of apple products and how ios treated me i'll tell you this all 3 platforms are the same google play store has the same process for getting on google play. all 3 of them get trash the difference is the system running them.
Well since you never tried to publish anything on those platforms you obviously don't know that to Google Play anyone with an e-mail and 5 dollars can publish any sort of malware they wish. It's up to Googles detection mechanisms to remove it afterwards - that is if they catch it. Apple pre-screens the code by human reviewers. Totally different process and totally another level of security.

I'm not familiar with the system used for Windows store, I assume most people avoid it.
 

Lunas

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Well since you never tried to publish anything on those platforms you obviously don't know that to Google Play anyone with an e-mail and 5 dollars can publish any sort of malware they wish. It's up to Googles detection mechanisms to remove it afterwards - that is if they catch it. Apple pre-screens the code by human reviewers. Totally different process and totally another level of security.

I'm not familiar with the system used for Windows store, I assume most people avoid it.
i know google has a pre publish review process that takes about 2 to 3 weeks... and i also know ios has had to remove malware from the ishop too.
 

B00nie

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i know google has a pre publish review process that takes about 2 to 3 weeks... and i also know ios has had to remove malware from the ishop too.
They didn't use to at least. If they review pre-publish, how is it possible that Google has currently hundreds of malicious titles in the Play store and Apple doesn't? Google used to use only automated review methods which missed things regularly.

It usually takes hours (1 to 2 hours) to approve (by google) and publish your app on play store for downloads.
Quote from Google.com so I think you're inventing stories.
 
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Lunas

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They didn't use to at least. If they review pre-publish, how is it possible that Google has currently hundreds of malicious titles in the Play store and Apple doesn't? Google used to use only automated review methods which missed things regularly.


Quote from Google.com so I think you're inventing stories.
i am just saying what a dev told us on discord for a something they were trying to publish. but even if they do it automated the 1-2 hours is more than enough to let a virus scanner read the source code. What gets me more is you think apple doesn't use automated review as well...
 

B00nie

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i am just saying what a dev told us on discord for a something they were trying to publish. but even if they do it automated the 1-2 hours is more than enough to let a virus scanner read the source code. What gets me more is you think apple doesn't use automated review as well...
Your dev was confusing Play store to App store apparantly. Play store never had a 2 week review like App store has. The automated virus detection doesn't detect most of the malware / information stealing functionality in the apps. It takes a human to analyse the potential for abuse.
 

Lunas

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Your dev was confusing Play store to App store apparantly. Play store never had a 2 week review like App store has. The automated virus detection doesn't detect most of the malware / information stealing functionality in the apps. It takes a human to analyse the potential for abuse.
no he said apple bounced him at the door... but whatever you can go on believing apple employees a team of devs to rigorously test and analyse every app that slides in their inbox. I'll choose to believe both of them run the app through a not so off the shelf av with source access. Before an automated machine checks every angry bird clone app. And then if they get complaints from users they put it up for more detailed review...
 

B00nie

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no he said apple bounced him at the door... but whatever you can go on believing apple employees a team of devs to rigorously test and analyse every app that slides in their inbox. I'll choose to believe both of them run the app through a not so off the shelf av with source access. Before an automated machine checks every angry bird clone app. And then if they get complaints from users they put it up for more detailed review...
Well, Google documentation speaks against your claim and I know for a fact that we had this discussion with our dev a couple years ago. The review is the reason why App store has so much fewer malicious apps in it.
 
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