What type of glue to use on subwoofer dust cap?

StoleMyOwnCar

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I bought a Mirage PS-10 subwoofer at Goodwill for about 30 bucks. When testing it at the store, I noticed that at low volumes it was fine, but then at higher volumes I had a flapping or the sound of something plastic hitting something. A quick look told me that the dust cap was just coming off. A decent chunk of it is still held on, and it looked like a very easy repair job, so I went and bought it anyway. The dust cap itself looks like it's in great condition. Here are some pictures:

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So, the only thing I have that I can find is a bottle of Aleene's Original Tacky Glue. That worked fine on the surround for my Paradigm Atom's woofer, but I'm not sure whether it's enough to hold on the dust cap for this subwoofer. It seems to have a lot of excursion. Anyone have some advice, or would Aleene's work fine?
 

StoleMyOwnCar

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https://www.amazon.com/Shoe-GOO-110...=UTF8&qid=1474601216&sr=8-2&keywords=shoe+goo
This stuff?

Does it at least take some time to set? I need some time to get the entire thing glued down. The whole reason I had to use two surrounds on my Paradigms was because the glue they came with just stuck on way too fast, not giving me enough time to get the entire thing down (it was an awkward fit). That's the whole reason I bought Aleene's in the first place.
 

DrLobotomy

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You could also use thick cyanoacrylate, which would give you a LITTLE time to get it in position.
 

B00nie

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Two component epoxy is the best for this sort of jobs. You can choose from anything to 2 minutes to 4 hours setting time. Mix the little amount you need, spread it to the edges, install the cap and put light compression on it until the remaining glue you mixed has set.

Two component works best because it doesn't need air to set, even closed surfaces have a good bond.
 
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StoleMyOwnCar

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Any recommended brands for the epoxy? This isn't something I go looking for regularly, so I'm a bit lost. A lot of the stuff I saw on Amazon was nearly as expensive as the subwoofer itself...
 

thesmokingman

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Epoxy for a dust cap? You want it removable or non-permanent. Use rubber cement. They sell black rubber cement for speaker repair on amazon, couple bucks.
 

N4CR

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Epoxy should be fine, if that coil goes the dust cap is the least of your worry. Just one thing to be aware of, cones should be rigid but if any flex does occur, a brittle epoxy may cause issues. So get something that sets a little rubbery or just rubber cement as the smokingman suggests.
 

GotNoRice

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Aleene's is 100% all you need. The idea that it wouldn't be enough to hold a dust cap on is silly, as Aleene's is the glue most speaker repair professionals use even for entire re-cone jobs.

Interesting how answers vary between computer sites like this and actual audio sites. No one on an actual audio site would be suggesting shoe-goo...
 

StoleMyOwnCar

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Aleene's is 100% all you need. The idea that it wouldn't be enough to hold a dust cap on is silly, as Aleene's is the glue most speaker repair professionals use even for entire re-cone jobs.

Interesting how answers vary between computer sites like this and actual audio sites. No one on an actual audio site would be suggesting shoe-goo...

Okay well... for now I'm just going with this suggestion first since:
1. I already have Aleene's lying around.
2. Both the cone and the dust cap are made out of fairly durable materials, so I don't think anything would happen if this doesn't work out, outside of me needing to try another glue.

Quick question: I kind of left a heavy-ish roll of measuring tape on the dust cap to keep it in place while the glue dries. Is it okay to have the cone pushed in (like nothing bending, just pushed in as if you applied some pressure with your hand) for a while, or is that going to mess up the driver somehow?
 

GotNoRice

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Quick question: I kind of left a heavy-ish roll of measuring tape on the dust cap to keep it in place while the glue dries. Is it okay to have the cone pushed in (like nothing bending, just pushed in as if you applied some pressure with your hand) for a while, or is that going to mess up the driver somehow?

Short term, it shouldn't matter as long as the voice coil isn't rubbing as a result of the manual pressure applied to the cone (unlikely).
 

B00nie

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3M is the 'go to' brand with glues.  Two Part Epoxy

I don't know how much your speaker cost but a tube of epoxy costs from 5 to 15 dollars usually. There are some exotic ones that cost way more of course, like stuff that's used in space.
 
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