what is your background?

berky

2[H]4U
Joined
Aug 28, 2001
Messages
2,233
Hey everyone.... I am attempting to do some basic market research (which as far as i can tell, is not against the rules, so apologies if it is).

I was curious what kind of backgrounds everyone around here has.

1) what specific type of IT work do you do? (for example: datacenter networking, support desk, consulting, ia specialist, application development, server sa, student, etc)

2) what ‘subject’ do you most wish you had more training on?

3) do you consider this ‘subject’ essential to your job/career? why or why not?


My answers:

1) datacenter networking

2) SDN

3) Yes, I think SDN is the future of networking and will be essential for everyone to learn
 

mvmiller12

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Aug 7, 2011
Messages
1,320
1) Support Desk
2) MS SQL Server
3) Yes, I have been doing some DB programming on the side
 

felt

Limp Gawd
Joined
Dec 17, 2009
Messages
502
right now i'm using a simple forest background, it's supposedly in " HDR ", looks fine though. I might change it later to something else. :)
 

Red Squirrel

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Nov 29, 2009
Messages
9,211
1) NOC technician (was helpdesk and L3 server support before)
2) Computer science
3) Yes, most places wont hire without computer science or equivalent.
 

jeffmoss26

2[H]4U
Joined
Aug 1, 2002
Messages
2,267
1) helpdesk/network/phone system/servers
2) windows server 2008/2012
3) yes, as we continue to update our systems
 

XOR != OR

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Jun 17, 2003
Messages
11,549
1) Datacenter, network security, application development, DBA, project management, VoiP administrator, data analyst
2) Accounting and other business functions.
3) I have filled various roles over the years as you can see, and more and more my limited knowledge of accounting and other business needs are holding back my effectiveness. Which is why I'm going back to school to learn accounting and bookkeeping. My basic research into the topic has already yielded huge benefits for my employers as I am better able to tailor our solutions to business needs.
 

DeChache

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Oct 30, 2005
Messages
7,088
1) Server Sys Admin (Came from Jack of All Trades IT)
2) Networking and now looking at SDN
3) I see as its essential because I hate being the sysadmin that asks stupid questions :p.
 

drstk

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Aug 26, 2009
Messages
4,384
1) Datacenter Network Admin
2) Scripting (mainly using python and power shell)
3) Yes, because of automation and quicker deployments.
 

klank

Killer of Killer NIC Threadz
Joined
Aug 22, 2011
Messages
2,177
Job 1 / Job 2
1) Network Engineer specializing in Enterprise Wireless Networks / IT Consultant
2) SDN / Active Directory
3) Yes, it's the future. / Yes, crucial to expanding my customer base.
 

Macco

Limp Gawd
Joined
Oct 15, 2010
Messages
148
1) Service Provider
2) Programming/Scripting in general, something I'm starting to get more into
3) Currently no, outside of our softswitch none of our gear has an API to interact with and changes are minimal enough that we can do this manually for the time being.
 

Ur_Mom

Fully [H]
Joined
May 15, 2006
Messages
20,631
1) helpdesk/network/phone system/servers
2) windows server 2008/2012
3) yes, as we continue to update our systems


About the same. Although, I am working in some programming stuff, too.

1) same
2) Server 2012R2/Programming
3) Yes/Kind of, depending on stuff...
 

Zanthras

n00b
Joined
May 25, 2010
Messages
14
1.) SaaS Network Engineer
2.) Programming
3.) Yes, knowing only "vendor" solutions is a great way to end up going no where.
 
Joined
Aug 6, 2014
Messages
9
1) Jr Sys Admin (second banana in a 2-man shop). I do some of everything from project rollouts and purchasing to helping users change their voicemail passwords by following the prompts.
2) Toss-up. On any given day, I usually either wish I knew more about the nuts-and-bolts level networking side of things (I know just enough to know that Dell's CLI annoys me when it's not enough like Cisco's), or I wish I knew SQL better so that I could consider a jump up in the world of pay rates.
3) Essential... not entirely, as I've been a confirmed generalist since I started out, and it's what I'm actually any good at. So knowing some, yes. Truly properly studying it... it'd likely be wasted in all honesty.
 

berky

2[H]4U
Joined
Aug 28, 2001
Messages
2,233
right now i'm using a simple forest background, it's supposedly in " HDR ", looks fine though. I might change it later to something else. :)

I seriously had to read this a few times to figure out what you were talking about... /facepalm
 

berky

2[H]4U
Joined
Aug 28, 2001
Messages
2,233
Thanks for all the replies so far... I find it very interesting to see how wide of a variety of specialties everyone is involved in.
 

Tee

Limp Gawd
Joined
Sep 7, 2010
Messages
224
1. Director of IT
2. Cryptography
3. Yes, understanding different ways to compress and transfer data more securely is essential.
 

boss99

2[H]4U
Joined
Dec 29, 2006
Messages
2,633
1. Network Engineer
2. Network security
3. Not necessarily, just the direction I hope to take my career
 

crustybooger

Limp Gawd
Joined
Apr 3, 2004
Messages
437
1. project manager/technical architect
2. accounting
3. yes. majority of my time is dedicated trying to save the company money.
 

tporter

Weaksauce
Joined
Mar 7, 2013
Messages
84
1. IT Director (datacenter farm management, SQL admin, network security analyst, VMWare admin, Unix Support Specialist for AIX, SCO, HPUX)
2. mobile software development
3. all software is progressing to mobile form or atleast made accesible from mobile client apps
 

Stugots

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Feb 25, 2004
Messages
6,991
1) *nix system engineering.

2) IBM Power virtualization

3) Yes. The primary platform I work with is IBM Power running AIX.
 

gc8dc95

n00b
Joined
Oct 25, 2012
Messages
51
1) Desktop / Server Support
2) SQL / Virtualization
3) Yes to both, they are important parts of nearly every IT system.
 

Proxy

Pumpkin Ghost
Joined
Apr 24, 2005
Messages
4,307
1) For the last 6 years: Network Security/Enterprise networking (Juniper/Cisco/Check Point). Also Linux administration.

2) SDN and VSX/VS.

3) I consider it quite essential. Both I am familiar with, but would like to be more proficient in as I am with my other skill sets.
 

FrEaKy

[H] Movie and TV Show Review Guy
Joined
Jan 31, 2003
Messages
13,959
1) Technical Support Help Desk -- ColdFusion Dev / DBA (MS SQL)
2) Full server side web dev / applet creation
3) The larger direction things are going is putting more and more emphasis on mobile computing / being able to do menial tasks from a smart device, being able to integrate everything into a company "cloud" (*HATE THAT TERM) is almost essential.
 
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