Water/Baking soda for block cleaning

Discussion in 'Overclocking & Cooling' started by VanGoghComplex, Apr 27, 2018.

  1. VanGoghComplex

    VanGoghComplex [H]ard|Gawd

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    I've been trying to figure out a way to clean a waterblock that does not lend itself to clean disassembly. I've gone through gallons of Sysprep, Reboot, vinegar, distilled, and even a bit of Dawn, but there are still some hazes and spots on the inside that are stubborn.

    I know that toothpaste is a common cleaning agent for waterblocks, presumably for it's mild abrasive properties, and got to thinking; baking soda is a common household cleaner for the same reason.

    I was thinking of making a fairly stout water/baking soda mixture and trying to run it through that waterblock for a couple hours. I'm no chemist though, and I don't know how/if I need to be concerned about things like acrylic, nickle plating, or o-rings in the presence of baking soda.

    Any thoughts?
     
  2. thesmokingman

    thesmokingman [H]ardness Supreme

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    If you are referring to the haziness leftover on acrylic... I'm not sure there is anything better than wiping it off.
     
  3. VanGoghComplex

    VanGoghComplex [H]ard|Gawd

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    Unfortunately, that's not an option. The block in question cannot be easily disassembled.
     
  4. SamirD

    SamirD 2[H]4U

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    I think you'll be just fine with baking soda as it is quite safe. The only thing you might run into is that it is quite fine of a powder and may still cause haziness if you don't get it all out.
     
  5. SamirD

    SamirD 2[H]4U

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    And if that doesn't do it and you're willing to go with something a bit harsher that you can adjust at will, try some barkeepers friend in a base of water. You can put in more if you want it to be harsher or less if you just want to be mild. Be sure to rinse thoroughly afterwards, but I've found it does wonders on various surfaces.
     
  6. Dekar12

    Dekar12 Gawd

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    vinegar and baking soda might help, but with that weird film that gets built up, pretty hard to get rid of it with no wiping action.