Wanting to buy & build my first DIY NAS, can you help out? (Parts advice)

NathanP2007

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I have had my eye on a couple of NAS boxes for a while, specifically the Synology DS416-Play and the WD MyCloud PR4100 (both around $500). Recently I was asked "why not just make your own for cheaper?" so here I am attempting to do that. I have built PC's before but never a NAS. I have basically no experience with the motherboards and CPU's in this price range, and I have no experience (yet, will do research) on NAS operating systems like FreeNAS, unRaid and the recently recommended for me; Open Media Vault.

My original parts list was derived from this blog which listed the


As you can see this build would be $600+. For my usage I don't think that makes sense. And while I love the NSC-400 and 800 design, the price for one of those cases is steep.

I was recommended a more down to Earth alternative to that build, here it is listed on PC Hound. But I'll list it here too:

  • $40 AMD Athlon 5350
  • $40 ASRock AM1B-ITX
  • $30 Team 8GB Elite Plus
  • $60 SeaSonic 360W G-Series SSR-360GP
  • $40 Cooler Master Elite 130 RC-130-KKN1 130 (though I just saw it can only hold 3 HDD's, i'd like room for 4)


1) What will you be doing with this NAS?
Storing files (pictures, videos, documents) including TV episodes and movies which I want to stream using Plex.

2) What's your budget? Are tax and shipping included?
No real budget but spending less than $500 is ideal.

3) Which country do you live in? If the U.S, please tell us the state and city if possible. Washington, USA

4) What exact parts do you need for that budget? CPU, RAM, case, etc. The word "Everything" is not a valid answer. Please list out all the parts you'll need. Case, CPU, RAM, PSU, Mobo.

5) Will you be overclocking?
No

6) What features do you need in a motherboard? RAID? Firewire? Crossfire or SLI support? USB 3.0? SATA 6Gb/s? eSATA? Onboard video (as a backup or main GPU)? UEFI? etc. If the motherboard doesn't have enough SATA ports I can always get a PCIe SATA card. I'd like two RAM DIMM slots so RAM can be expanded if necessary.


What I am curious about is with your experience and knowledge, can you recommend better components that aren't critically more expensive? Maybe you know of a Mobo/CPU combo that would be a better fit for just a bit more money or maybe you know of a better PSU for the same price? I personally haven't even heard of the brand "Team Elite" which the RAM is so any opinions on that would be welcome. I am just trying to find the right components (price, power, quality) that will do what I am desiring (storage, Plex streaming) and then I'll pull the trigger and buy them and build it. I don't have a problem paying a bit more to get the best "bang for your buck" components.

Thanks!

(P.S. Given my needs what is the NAS OS you recommend me using?)
 
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Bandalo

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How many drives are you looking at adding in the long run? Any ideas on initial drive size/number of drives? Any plans for backup?

Personally I like the ease and security of buying a prebuilt NAS. Synology and QNAP both make really nice products, and the cost isn't much more than buying a new pile of parts yourself in general. Building your own is great if you have most of the parts laying around already, but if you're already starting from scratch...
 

NathanP2007

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How many drives are you looking at adding in the long run? Any ideas on initial drive size/number of drives? Any plans for backup?

Personally I like the ease and security of buying a prebuilt NAS. Synology and QNAP both make really nice products, and the cost isn't much more than buying a new pile of parts yourself in general. Building your own is great if you have most of the parts laying around already, but if you're already starting from scratch...

In the foreseeable future I'll probably have just two drives in the NAS but I'd like to have the ability to expand to four. Initial drive size is probably 4TB x2.

I get the buying a prebuild and I really do like the Synology I mentioned in the OP, and their OS looks awesome, but I've been told that for the same price or cheaper I can build something more powerful myself. Also I've been told that even the $450 DS416-Play could have issues streaming Plex to say more than one device. (Though for now it would just stream to my PC but I would like the NAS future proofed power-wise so it can stream to 2 or more devices at the same time).

--------------------------------------------------------------------

On a separate note, just searching around Newegg I see components like this $74 ASRock A88M-ITX/ac FM2+ / FM2 AMD A88X (Bolton D4) SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 HDMI Mini ITX AMD Motherboard and $110 AMD A10-7860K with AMD quiet cooler Quad-Core Socket FM2+ 65W AD786KYBJCSBX Desktop Processor AMD Radeon R7 and while they are likely more powerful and expensive than I need, I don't mind paying a bit more for more power, which also helps if I ever wanted to convert the NAS into a Windows 10 using PC/HTPC someday.

Case wise (I love that Cooler Master but it only holds three HDD's, and I want my case to hold 4 minimum. It looks like this Fractal Design Node 304 Black Aluminum/Steel Mini-ITX Small Form Factor Computer Case can hold six HDD's so for now it will be the case I am looking at, if you have others you can recommend I'd love to see them.
 

Bandalo

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I get where you're coming from, but I don't know if you're going to be really saving that much money. You CAN build something more powerful for the same price. But if you're like most home users, 95% of the time your NAS will be idle. By the time you get a decent case, motherboard / CPU, RAM, and power supply, you're going to pushing $400-500 already. At that point, you might as well buy something that's designed for what you're doing and has the OS all neat and tidy.

Any decent QNAP or Synology NAS will handle streaming to multiple devices at 4k rates with no problem. The limit will almost always be the 1Gb LAN connections. Now if you're relying on the NAS for transcoding as well, then it's a different story, you need a beefier CPU/GPU onboard.

I personally have a 5-bay Synology that I bought in 2011. It's been running 24/7 since I got it without a hiccup. I stream movies and TV to my tablets with Kodi (formerly XBMC), and I've never had a problem streaming to the TV, the kid's tablet, and moving files around for backups at the same time. It's been overkill for anything I throw at it, from playing with iSCSI for VM hosting to running "personal cloud" software and a mail server. When this one dies, I'll either get a QNAP or another Synology.
 

NathanP2007

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I get where you're coming from, but I don't know if you're going to be really saving that much money. You CAN build something more powerful for the same price. But if you're like most home users, 95% of the time your NAS will be idle. By the time you get a decent case, motherboard / CPU, RAM, and power supply, you're going to pushing $400-500 already. At that point, you might as well buy something that's designed for what you're doing and has the OS all neat and tidy.

Any decent QNAP or Synology NAS will handle streaming to multiple devices at 4k rates with no problem. The limit will almost always be the 1Gb LAN connections. Now if you're relying on the NAS for transcoding as well, then it's a different story, you need a beefier CPU/GPU onboard.

I personally have a 5-bay Synology that I bought in 2011. It's been running 24/7 since I got it without a hiccup. I stream movies and TV to my tablets with Kodi (formerly XBMC), and I've never had a problem streaming to the TV, the kid's tablet, and moving files around for backups at the same time. It's been overkill for anything I throw at it, from playing with iSCSI for VM hosting to running "personal cloud" software and a mail server. When this one dies, I'll either get a QNAP or another Synology.

To be fair though to your point, the specs in my OP (Mobo + CPU + Case + RAM) totals out to $220...which is a far cry from the $460 of the Synology DS416-Play. Even with the more powerful components I replied to your comment with (AsRock A88M + AMD 8760K + Node 304) the price would really only be bumped up to around $300 total for the entire NAS.

Don't get me wrong I do like your ringing endorsement of Synology, I do love the simplicity of the plug & play. But even if you're right (which I don't doubt) that it can do everything I want and maybe more...I am left wondering if for $300 ($160 less than the DS416-Play) my building of my own would net me a significantly more powerful device which can hold two more HDD's and can be converted easily into a regular PC (just add a SSD with a OS installed on it).
 

Bandalo

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Yeah, you're paying some money for the case w/ the hot-swap racks, as well as the OS when you're going with QNAP/Synology. You're also paying a bit for the multiple network connections. Most NAS units will have 2-4 1Gb ports so you can improve the overall bandwidth. Not sure if FreeNAS supports this easily, but if it does, I'd recommend adding a 1Gb NIC to your build list.

I ran Windows Home Server for a couple years when it first came out, then FreeNAS after that. Both required a lot more time and energy for initial configuration, and then lots of "maintenance" tweaks here and there. I know FreeNAS has probably improved, and I haven't used OpenMediaVault, so maybe someone else can comment there.

I like set-and-forget for my NAS. I want it to run 24/7 and operate with no interference on my part. I want it always running and not require any babysitting. My Synology operated flawlessly for my wife and kids while I was gone on a 9 month deployment. Didn't ever even need a reboot. I know the version of FreeNAS I was using couldn't have handled that. It backs up everything to some old USB hard drives on a daily basis, and backs up my irreplaceable stuff to Amazon Glacier every night. I have a couple Chrome addons so I can right-click on a torrent link or even a regular download link and send the download task to my NAS. I'd personally say spend the cash once and get a good NAS and then you won't need to worry about it for years.

Probably should get some people with more recent FreeNAS experience to chime in here..I may be completely out of touch with the current version's capabilities compared to the Synology/QNAP OS.
 

SomeGuy133

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Yeah, you're paying some money for the case w/ the hot-swap racks, as well as the OS when you're going with QNAP/Synology. You're also paying a bit for the multiple network connections. Most NAS units will have 2-4 1Gb ports so you can improve the overall bandwidth. Not sure if FreeNAS supports this easily, but if it does, I'd recommend adding a 1Gb NIC to your build list.

I ran Windows Home Server for a couple years when it first came out, then FreeNAS after that. Both required a lot more time and energy for initial configuration, and then lots of "maintenance" tweaks here and there. I know FreeNAS has probably improved, and I haven't used OpenMediaVault, so maybe someone else can comment there.

I like set-and-forget for my NAS. I want it to run 24/7 and operate with no interference on my part. I want it always running and not require any babysitting. My Synology operated flawlessly for my wife and kids while I was gone on a 9 month deployment. Didn't ever even need a reboot. I know the version of FreeNAS I was using couldn't have handled that. It backs up everything to some old USB hard drives on a daily basis, and backs up my irreplaceable stuff to Amazon Glacier every night. I have a couple Chrome addons so I can right-click on a torrent link or even a regular download link and send the download task to my NAS. I'd personally say spend the cash once and get a good NAS and then you won't need to worry about it for years.

Probably should get some people with more recent FreeNAS experience to chime in here..I may be completely out of touch with the current version's capabilities compared to the Synology/QNAP OS.
or buy 10GbE NIC and a 250 dollar 2 port 10GbE switch.

shoudl actually set it up this week. I hit some snags with main rig eating shit.

https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B00KVF7S40/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1
 

Bandalo

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or buy 10GbE NIC and a 250 dollar 2 port 10GbE switch.

shoudl actually set it up this week. I hit some snags with main rig eating shit.

https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B00KVF7S40/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

10GbE is going to a requirement when I replace my NAS. But I'm holding off for a while until my current one dies. The price of 10G switches is just insane, especially for 10GbE over copper. When I can get a switch with 4x10GbE and at least 6-8 1GbE ports for <$150 I'll upgrade.
 
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OP, I was in a very similar situation as you a few years ago - needed a NAS for basic home needs, mostly backup for various PCs and Macs, central and larger storage for TV recordings and other streamable media, etc. Elected to build my own rather than go with a Synology. TBH in retrospect, I'd probably have gone with the Synology route.

To me the compelling reasons to DIY rather than Synology / QNAP are the following. Note that some of these reasons require more expensive parts:
  1. You want to virtualize the NAS on top of a type I hypervisor because either you have other server needs not met by Synology's DSM or want to run a desktop OS on the same hardware.
  2. You want to use ECC memory or ZFS to protect your data.
  3. You want a large number of HDDs, certainly >=8 but probably even >=5, because prebuilts of this capacity are pretty expensive (note needing more HDDs is not the same as needing more TBs!)
  4. You absolutely need to transcode media in real time on the server itself but cannot afford the prebuilt "*-play" versions that have this capability.
  5. You have a reasonable number of quality parts already available and / or you have a Microcenter nearby, where CPUs and motherboards are cheap(er).
  6. You do not mind having a relatively larger footprint and relatively higher energy consumption.
 

NathanP2007

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Hmmm, I take this advice with much thought, thank you YummyGizzards. I'd say the only one that really applies to me but it isn't a dead-set requirement is #1 in regards to being able to run a desktop OS on the same hardware. If i was to build my own NAS with the parts listed above (AsRock A88M + AMD 8760K + 8GB DDR3 + 500W PSU + Node 304) I'd likely be spending less than I would on the DS416Play and also have the ability later on (if I wanted) to add a SSD with Windows installed on it and make the NAS into a legit PC. Knowing I could do that is really nice, where as with the DS416Play it is a NAS and will always be a NAS.
 

SomeGuy133

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Yeah, I am looking to build my first NAS, not setup 10GbE...
again someone made the point that QNAP and other NASes use several 1GbE to have adequate bandwidth to work. My point is it is easy and reasonable cheap to get 10GbE to run off your NAS so it can feed the whole network with 0 bottleneck vs trying to throw in several 1GbE NICs and load balancing it.

10GbE is going to a requirement when I replace my NAS. But I'm holding off for a while until my current one dies. The price of 10G switches is just insane, especially for 10GbE over copper. When I can get a switch with 4x10GbE and at least 6-8 1GbE ports for <$150 I'll upgrade.

the point is so the NAS isn't bottlenecked. 3-5 people accessing a NAS over 1GbE is trash
 
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Bandalo

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the point is so the NAS isn't bottlenecked. 3-5 people accessing a NAS over 1GbE is trash

That REALLY depends on what the people are doing. If they're doing full-speed file copies back and forth and running VMs, then yes. If they're just opening and closing office applications, or streaming music/video, it works fine. 10GbE is better by far, but it's a HUGE jump in cost right now. A 4-bay QNAP with 4 1GbE ports that does the load balancing on it's own (even if the switch doesn't support it) is only $600. If you want to step up to a NAS with a 10GbE port, or even one with a PCI-E slot so you can add your own is $900-1000. Then tack on a $200-300 10GbE switch. And you'll never push 10GbE with this type of NAS unless you're running SSDs or a big SSD cache anyway, which is going to add even more cost.

It's a LOT to spend for a home NAS.
 

SomeGuy133

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That REALLY depends on what the people are doing. If they're doing full-speed file copies back and forth and running VMs, then yes. If they're just opening and closing office applications, or streaming music/video, it works fine. 10GbE is better by far, but it's a HUGE jump in cost right now. A 4-bay QNAP with 4 1GbE ports that does the load balancing on it's own (even if the switch doesn't support it) is only $600. If you want to step up to a NAS with a 10GbE port, or even one with a PCI-E slot so you can add your own is $900-1000. Then tack on a $200-300 10GbE switch. And you'll never push 10GbE with this type of NAS unless you're running SSDs or a big SSD cache anyway, which is going to add even more cost.

It's a LOT to spend for a home NAS.
dude it is 250 for switch and 100 for cable and NIC its 400 tops to do it not 1000
 

NathanP2007

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That REALLY depends on what the people are doing. If they're doing full-speed file copies back and forth and running VMs, then yes. If they're just opening and closing office applications, or streaming music/video, it works fine. 10GbE is better by far, but it's a HUGE jump in cost right now. A 4-bay QNAP with 4 1GbE ports that does the load balancing on it's own (even if the switch doesn't support it) is only $600. If you want to step up to a NAS with a 10GbE port, or even one with a PCI-E slot so you can add your own is $900-1000. Then tack on a $200-300 10GbE switch. And you'll never push 10GbE with this type of NAS unless you're running SSDs or a big SSD cache anyway, which is going to add even more cost.

It's a LOT to spend for a home NAS.

This is what I was thinking. But overall this is all irrelevant, I am trying to get advice about building a NAS and asking about the components I have listed and what ya'll think. Not about going on a side tangent about 10GbE networking.
 

Bandalo

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dude it is 250 for switch and 100 for cable and NIC its 400 tops to do it not 1000

A NAS that supports 10GbE will start around $900-1000. Then you need a switch and NICs to take advantage of it. Even a NAS that can be UPGRADED to support 10GbE (i.e., one with an open PCI-E slot) will still run >$800 minimum.

This is what I was thinking. But overall this is all irrelevant, I am trying to get advice about building a NAS and asking about the components I have listed and what ya'll think. Not about going on a side tangent about 10GbE networking.

Agreed, sorry about that. Didn't mean to derail your thread!
 

SomeGuy133

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This is what I was thinking. But overall this is all irrelevant, I am trying to get advice about building a NAS and asking about the components I have listed and what ya'll think. Not about going on a side tangent about 10GbE networking.

was simply informing you of your options. Never heard anyone bitch about getting solid info

A NAS that supports 10GbE will start around $900-1000. Then you need a switch and NICs to take advantage of it. Even a NAS that can be UPGRADED to support 10GbE (i.e., one with an open PCI-E slot) will still run >$800 minimum.



Agreed, sorry about that. Didn't mean to derail your thread!

Again, as stated...not sure why you can't read. He is building a custom NAS and it is
$250
https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B00KVF7S40/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&tag=hardfocom-20
$20
10GBASE-SR SFP+ Transceiver | FS.COM
$20
10M LC UPC to LC UPC Duplex 3.0mm PVC(OFNR) 10G OM3 Armored Fiber Optic Patch Cable | FS.COM
$50
Intel X520-DA1 single port SFP+ 10Gb Ethernet network card low profile

Boom 350 bucks and you have 10GbE NAS. Stop talking out of your ass and spreading bad info
 

Ranulfo

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I've lost much interest I've had in building a custom nas/media server that is itx based in the past few years. Just too much of a hassle.

For your stated goals, it might be better to roll your own but just remember with this stuff, time is money. Since you want possible flexibility on a budget, I'd look at one of those A8/A10 chips in the node 304 you mention. Team ram is fine and I wouldn't bother with server grade hardware. Take the savings and buy a couple of spare external drives for further backup.

FreeNas is a nice OS when it wants to work. When it doesn't, enjoy reading wiki's and a cranky forum who will berate you unless you built your system as a serious server to their preference.
 
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Hmmm, I take this advice with much thought, thank you YummyGizzards. I'd say the only one that really applies to me but it isn't a dead-set requirement is #1 in regards to being able to run a desktop OS on the same hardware. If i was to build my own NAS with the parts listed above (AsRock A88M + AMD 8760K + 8GB DDR3 + 500W PSU + Node 304) I'd likely be spending less than I would on the DS416Play and also have the ability later on (if I wanted) to add a SSD with Windows installed on it and make the NAS into a legit PC. Knowing I could do that is really nice, where as with the DS416Play it is a NAS and will always be a NAS.

In almost all cases, the key to add a desktop OS to the NAS is support of virtualization by both the CPU and the motherboard. I am not familiar with AMD at all to know whether this APU and board support AMD-V. For this option to work best, you will probably also need another PCIe GPU to pass through to the windows OS. The only way to avoid virtualization would be to use Window's own file sharing capability as the "NAS" service - is that what you envision doing? Plex media server runs on Windows, so that is covered.
 

Bandalo

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was simply informing you of your options. Never heard anyone bitch about getting solid info


Boom 350 bucks and you have 10GbE NAS. Stop talking out of your ass and spreading bad info

I'm not talking out of my ass, I'm talking about pre-built NAS systems (i.e., Synology, QNAP, etc). Also, you're talking $350 on top of the $300-400 you'd spend on the rest of the NAS, not just $350 and you're done.
 

alex_di

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I did this six months ago. This is the build:

dUBtOT4.png


I strongly recommend used server parts and ECC memory instead of desktop components. I've had plenty of desktop-based file servers. This one has been significantly more reliable than all of them. It also has IPMI, so I can hide it in a closet without inconvenience. The compromise for used parts is that, until recently, there weren't any mITX server motherboards, so a truly NAS-sized NAS isn't an option.

I also recommend starting with RAID-1 and eventually, if your array has more than four drives, transitioning to RAID-6 or equivalent. RAID-5 has a high probability (> 1 in 10) of failing during a rebuild.

Here's one possible DIY build:

$30 Intel Xeon X3450
$15 Intel CPU cooler
$45 Supermicro X8SIL-F
$30 2 x 8 GB DDR3 ECC
$30 400W 80+ PSU
$30 64GB SSD
$65 Adaptec 5805Z RAID/battery/cables
$200 2 x WL 4 TB 5400 RPM

Leaves about $50 for a case. Opting for ZFS and software parity won't save much money; you'll just end up with an IT-flashed LSI card in place of the Adaptec. Personally, for a system that's likely to grow, I wouldn't. I've had three Adaptec cards (and two from LSI); the speed, reliability, flexibility, and management tools of the former have been peerless.

There aren't many mATX cases suitable for a NAS. The (rather enormous) Node 804 is one of them. The Phenom is another. It's better-built, quiet, and will hold, with a bit of tweaking, 7 HDDs.

10Gbe is not worth the discussion. I appreciate it when moving large files between my SSD and my RAID-6 array. Otherwise, even for things that you'd think would blow through bandwidth like installing games from ISO, it's indistinguishable from 1Gbe.

The easy solution is just to buy an old server. There are plenty of ATX and rack servers for half your budget. They're just big and loud.
 
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SomeGuy133

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I'm not talking out of my ass, I'm talking about pre-built NAS systems (i.e., Synology, QNAP, etc). Also, you're talking $350 on top of the $300-400 you'd spend on the rest of the NAS, not just $350 and you're done.
I explicitly said 10 GbE for custom NAS as OP is doing and you are back tracking to cover up your statements....plus they are inherently vague as you are saying it is $1000 upgrade for a PCIe slot or some weird shit.

Even if a NAS that has PCI slot it still is only 350 bucks even though you claimed it would be 1000 or maybe you can't make a coherent thought and was saying a nas with a PCIe slot starts at 1000? I can't read your half thoughts if that is what you meant.

To your BS SSD comment
(just tested my 6TB HDD i get 58/100 for 512K R/W and 208/208 R/W for sequential...this was not outer platter either that is like 250MBps) Plus SnapRaid is like a JBOD

Also modern day HDDs do 200-300MBps so 1GbE is a joke and if you have a 8+ TB NAS large transfers should be common....otherwise why would you have a 8+ TB NAS. 1 PC backing up can hose the entire NAS the entire night. it'll take an hour just to move 300GB and completely hose the entire network.

vs

with 10GbE you can have 2-3 PCs back up at once and still stream plex to every device in the house. Again 2 or 3 PCs backing up is 400-600MBps easy.

Also what do you stream? When I finish i will be stream full BD quality so that is 10MBps on some content and that is not counting any buffering
 
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alex_di

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Also modern day HDDs do 200-300MBps so 1GbE is a joke and if you have a 8+ TB NAS large transfers should be common....otherwise why would you have a 8+ TB NAS. 1 PC backing up can hose the entire NAS the entire night. it'll take an hour just to move 300GB and completely hose the entire network.

vs

with 10GbE you can have 2-3 PCs back up at once and still stream plex to every device in the house. Again 2 or 3 PCs backing up is 400-600MBps easy.

You may find 10Gb disappointing in practice. While a single large sequential write to an unoccupied HDD-based array may well saturate 1Gb, smaller files and concurrent writes radically lower throughput; bandwidth would not be a limiting factor for the scenario you're positing. It's also probable that if your home backup routine requires daily 300GB transfers, it would benefit from optimization before you throw hardware at it.
 

SomeGuy133

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You may find 10Gb disappointing in practice. While a single large sequential write to an unoccupied HDD-based array may well saturate 1Gb, smaller files and concurrent writes radically lower throughput; bandwidth would not be a limiting factor for the scenario you're positing. It's also probable that if your home backup routine requires daily 300GB transfers, it would benefit from optimization before you throw hardware at it.

again 512K is still 50MBps read and 100MBps write. (smaller files are like 10-30MBps but its rare to have those small files) Also Snapraid works like a JBOD Movies on 1 drive, TV on another, anime, Back up, Back up, , back up, Misc files, junk storage, 1-2 HDDs i still have unused. designed so concurrent reads/writes are never an issue (for the most part)...boom. All 3/4 PCs can back up to their own drives for the most part and TV/Movies are seperate and so far regular files.

its a con and pro of Snapraid working like a JBOD. Any single process does not benefit from being striped like RAID 60 or ZFS but at the same time each hardrive can function at full speed. I don't suffer from single or 2 hardrive speed over the whole system like ZFS. I can use all drives at once. These are all things OP needs to consider on his design so it meets his needs and wants. Maybe he regularly backs up. Maybe he has alot go on at once, maybe he is too lazy to create a stupid sechule for tasks and just wants it to work.

trust me it would be nice to have a striped NAS able to do 300-400MBps for a single large transfer but I don't think Snapraid can do that....if it can I might try making that work for a few drives. Maybe their is a way to make drives stripped in Snapraid at the cost of redundancy. Might be handy might not be.
 

Bandalo

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I explicitly said 10 GbE for custom NAS as OP is doing and you are back tracking to cover up your statements....plus they are inherently vague as you are saying it is $1000 upgrade for a PCIe slot or some weird shit.

Even if a NAS that has PCI slot it still is only 350 bucks even though you claimed it would be 1000 or maybe you can't make a coherent thought and was saying a nas with a PCIe slot starts at 1000? I can't read your half thoughts if that is what you meant.

I haven't backtracked on a thing or trying to be vague. Have YOU ever looked at pre-build NAS prices and capabilities? Or are you intentionally trying to be vague and insulting?

A decent 4 or 6 bay NAS from either QNAP or Synology will be around $500-600. That's with somewhere between 2-4 1GbE ports, depending on the model. If you want to get a NAS that either already has 10GbE, OR has a PCI-E slot for adding your own 10GbE card, they start around $900-1000.

The cost of adding 10GbE isn't cheap. You've already quoted the price of the switch, cables and NICs. The OP ALSO needs to buy the NAS hardware too, which you never included in your discussion.
 

SomeGuy133

2[H]4U
Joined
Apr 12, 2015
Messages
3,447
I haven't backtracked on a thing or trying to be vague. Have YOU ever looked at pre-build NAS prices and capabilities? Or are you intentionally trying to be vague and insulting?

A decent 4 or 6 bay NAS from either QNAP or Synology will be around $500-600. That's with somewhere between 2-4 1GbE ports, depending on the model. If you want to get a NAS that either already has 10GbE, OR has a PCI-E slot for adding your own 10GbE card, they start around $900-1000.

The cost of adding 10GbE isn't cheap. You've already quoted the price of the switch, cables and NICs. The OP ALSO needs to buy the NAS hardware too, which you never included in your discussion.
he isn't buying a prebuilt NAS.......so your point is moot...... Still only $350 for 10GbE....
 
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