Vmware Workstation vs. Vmware player

Discussion in 'Operating Systems' started by merc141, Sep 24, 2008.

  1. merc141

    merc141 Limp Gawd

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    I wanted to run fedora from within vista like Vmware workstation, but I can't afford it. What are the limitations or restrictions with Vmware player? Will I still be able to install software within the linux installation like a normal installl? I am just confused on how this sort of thing works. I am assuming that somehow Workstation converts an ISO or linux installation to some format that vmware player will be able to use. If this is true, where are these files? Are there distros somewhere that have been converted? Any help would be wonderful.
     
  2. dbwillis

    dbwillis [H]ardness Supreme

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    VMWare player can only play (ie RUN) virtual machines that have already been created in either VMWare Server or VMWare Workstation

    Workstation costs $$$ but server is free, each has different features.

    You can download prebuilt VM's from VMware.com, look for 'virtual appliances'

    If you get work/server, you can tell it to use the ISO image as a CDRom drive and install from that, but YOU have to build the machine, just as if it was a real physical machine. It doesnt convert the ISO into a machine for you.
     
  3. Joe Average

    Joe Average Ad Blocker - Banned

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    Give VirtualBox a shot. Faster, leaner, more efficient, and free. Much smaller download, faster installation, very easy configuration, works with most anything, and doesn't leave 4 services hanging around when it's not even running.

    As for Workstation vs Player, the answer provided above is accurate. VMWare Server is free... it does basically everything that Workstation does and even more, and allows you to create VMs just like Workstation as well.

    I'd still - and I do - recommend VirtualBox over VMWare in almost all situations. It's just too good at what it does to not mention it when discussing VM software these days.
     
  4. merc141

    merc141 Limp Gawd

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    Thanks for the tip. I will give virtual box a shot. So let me get this straight... both virtual box and Vmware use "appliances" along with whatever media I need for the guest os? Also is it possible to create an appliance in Vmware Server to use in Virtual box? I will take a look to see if I can find these so I don't have to make them myself.
     
  5. requiemnoise

    requiemnoise Gawd

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    it depends on the virtual disk driver. SCSI conversion should be fine. Sometimes, IDE controllers have glitches. The best way to convert the disk is use Qemu's RAW disk conversion tool.
     
  6. Joe Average

    Joe Average Ad Blocker - Banned

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    "Appliances" are pre-built pre-installed VMs you can download. As long as the guest OS is open source or just free outright (meaning something based on Linux more often than not), you can find them all over the place. VMWare offers a bunch of "appliances" meaning pre-built pre-installed customized versions of whatever on their website that get you up and running quick.

    VirtualBox VMs aren't necessarily compatible with VMWare VMs, but I think there's a converter that will make the required modifications to either so you can use VMs created for one with the other. I've never delved that far into using appliances as I install the guest OSes myself then just stash the VM on a DVD someplace for restoration as required, with both products, and VirtualPC 2007 also (good for if you only want to run Windows OSes inside Windows, it simply can't do Linux that well and requires some extra work to do such things).