Twitch Adds 1080p/60fps Video Support and 6000 kbps Ingest Capabilities

cageymaru

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Twitch.tv has added 1080p/60fps streaming capabilities to their service by increasing the allowed ingest bitrate to 6000 kbps. This will allow for much more fluid video playback on channels where it has been enabled. Those channels will have lower bitrate options also! It is coming to all of Twitch in the coming weeks, but for now they are rolling it out slowly to a few channels. To test and see if your channel supports the new higher bitrate formats, visit Twitch Inspector and see if your channel supports "Transcode V2". If so then you're ready to test the higher bitrates and increased quality streams. There are several guides on this Twitch support page to ease the transition to higher quality video.

This is the perfect time for a new Intel X99 or AMD Ryzen build as they recommend a "slow" CPU preset. The slow setting should really tax the encoding capabilities of your hardware and I'm wary that a quad core will suffice if gaming on the system at the same time. Awesome time for a new hardware build with more cores!

Your Twitch streams will soon look finer than ever thanks to our new 1080p/60fps video support.

For starters, we’re no longer limiting our ingest bitrate to 3.5 megabits. We officially recommend 3–6 megabits for most streams, skewing toward the higher end for 1080p broadcasts or faster, more demanding games.

We’re also rolling out a new set of numbered quality options (transcodes, if you’re fancy), starting today. Viewers now have more choices, and you won’t have to worry about them dropping to 480p when “source quality” is unavailable. Combined with our recent transcode updates, it’s never been easier to stream higher quality video to more people.
 
Youtube has had this for awhile, but it is darn hard to find livestreams on the Youtube service without memorizing the silly page where they reside. You'd think that they would have it plastered all over your homepage when visiting the site.
 
I was surprised a few weeks ago when twitch chat was telling a streamer that I watch that bitrate over 3k didn't matter because twitch couldn't support it. So about time indeed!
 
Youtube has had this for awhile, but it is darn hard to find livestreams on the Youtube service without memorizing the silly page where they reside. You'd think that they would have it plastered all over your homepage when visiting the site.

Yeah they need to do a better job at integrating their live service. I prefer not having to visit a completely different area of youtube for streaming.
 
RIP those viewers that have 1TB data caps. Hey ISPs, I thought 1TB was good for everything people needed?
 
RIP those viewers that have 1TB data caps. Hey ISPs, I thought 1TB was good for everything people needed?

I am glad the internet is putting pressure on data caps. Maybe then the ISPs will take their head out of their asses. I want my games to be 50GB+ and all my movies to stream in 4K/60FPS as a big fuck you to all the providers. I make sure towards the end of my cycle to reach 900GB on my allowance even if I have to delete a game from steam to get there.
 
A large chunk of my data goes towards watching CSGO/DOTA league streams. This won't help in hitting that 1TB cap...
 
Here is something that I REALLY like about this:

When using NVENC (or QuickSync, or the AMD version of hardware encode), the previous max bitrate of 3500kbps was not sufficient for good quality. That's why people used software encoding, it looks much better. With this high of a bitrate, even NVENC can look decent. Perhaps software encode still has a leg up in quality, but this might close the gap somewhat.
 
I am glad the internet is putting pressure on data caps. Maybe then the ISPs will take their head out of their asses. I want my games to be 50GB+ and all my movies to stream in 4K/60FPS as a big fuck you to all the providers. I make sure towards the end of my cycle to reach 900GB on my allowance even if I have to delete a game from steam to get there.
Well if you don't like the data cap, you can always move. That's the only option quite a few people have.
 
Hype hype hype, tech tech tech, ....... "No supported video backend available; flash is not installed".

lol.
 
Here is something that I REALLY like about this:

When using NVENC (or QuickSync, or the AMD version of hardware encode), the previous max bitrate of 3500kbps was not sufficient for good quality. That's why people used software encoding, it looks much better. With this high of a bitrate, even NVENC can look decent. Perhaps software encode still has a leg up in quality, but this might close the gap somewhat.

Only if you don't want 60fps.

Otherwise, you're back to the same problem.

But it is cool you have the option.
 
This is staging for H.265 (at last). H.265 isn't worth the trouble with the bandwidth cap they used to have, but at 6k and using H.265 it might become feasible to do 3K, 4K, or various ultra-wide formats. I'd guess they'll start allowing H.265 encodes within the next 12 months.
 
This is staging for H.265 (at last). H.265 isn't worth the trouble with the bandwidth cap they used to have, but at 6k and using H.265 it might become feasible to do 3K, 4K, or various ultra-wide formats. I'd guess they'll start allowing H.265 encodes within the next 12 months.
I remember when H.265 was requested by the community, they didn't push it because mobile devices couldn't process the video. I'm guessing that's changed by now?
 
It's about damn time!

funny thing is up until about 2 years ago when streaming really took off there was no bandwidth and resolution limit. but hey if they want to brand it as a new thing sure i go ahead...


I remember when H.265 was requested by the community, they didn't push it because mobile devices couldn't process the video. I'm guessing that's changed by now?

possibly, i know they've been testing it for the last 6 months with the league of legends LCS streams until they broke it a couple weeks ago with the auto quality detection but finally fixed it this weekend.
 
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But youtube allows me to stream my native 1440@90hz at 15-20mb/s, having gigabit internet helps
 
Here, the norm is data caps between 50~100GB/month... (Montreal)... I just don't get it... how does ISP get away with that ?
I just had a fight with a co-worker about this... he was saying [he's ~60years and does not consume much data] "it's enough for the average joe"....

So.. that's OK ? If he had young kids with a console or PC or netflix or... name it... that bandwidth is gone FAST ! Good thing I got a commercial account which give me "free" unlimited...

ISP needs to adjust to the world... not the other way around..
 
Here, the norm is data caps between 50~100GB/month... (Montreal)... I just don't get it... how does ISP get away with that ?
I just had a fight with a co-worker about this... he was saying [he's ~60years and does not consume much data] "it's enough for the average joe"....

So.. that's OK ? If he had young kids with a console or PC or netflix or... name it... that bandwidth is gone FAST ! Good thing I got a commercial account which give me "free" unlimited...

ISP needs to adjust to the world... not the other way around..
I think it's more to do with the size of the country, both Canada and US are big countries and both seem to have data caps, and the communication infrastructure is laid down by the ISPs themselves, out of their own pockets, I think (correct me if I am wrong). But country size is a main factor.

On the flip side, internet in Ireland or Taiwan (given small countries) don't have data caps on landline internet. Ireland in theory had them, but never enforced it, and IIRC they removed them entirely. Taiwan never had them from the start, and putting data caps would, in theory, spell death to landline nets, because the unlimited data plans on mobiles are actually within a hair's breath of landlines. But both Ireland and Taiwan are small island countries, and the main telecom that lays the internet infrastructure used to be state owned (Telecom Eireann for Ireland, now called Eircom, and ChungHwa Telecom for Taiwan), now both are at least semi-private, if not completely privately owned.
 
Meanwhile I can still throw 1440p 60fps at 18000 bitrate at Youtube and it doesn't give a fuck. Hilariously I also threw a lossless compressed stream at it, uploading at over 100mbp/s and it still went live - albeit laggy as fuck.

It archives absolutely everything automatically, downscales the stream to lesser qualities automatically, and is still all around flat out a better service. For the most part.
 
Just need YouTube to do the same. That suffers from terrible bitrate limitations too.

3.5Mbps is just not enough bandwidth for full HD or higher H264 video.
 
really they want me to replace my laptops (they hate 60fps but can run 30FPS perfectly fine ) i am not really a supporter for 60FPS (as long as they have high enough bit rates at 1080/720p at 30fps i dont mind) as currently 720p (high setting) is 1500 kbs which is to low
 
really they want me to replace my laptops (they hate 60fps but can run 30FPS perfectly fine ) i am not really a supporter for 60FPS (as long as they have high enough bit rates at 1080/720p at 30fps i dont mind) as currently 720p (high setting) is 1500 kbs which is to low

...what? lol Why are you replacing laptops? And why wouldn't you support 60fps? o.o
 
Hey, twitch streamers - how I can get rid of this?

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PS: I get better speedtest results on the HTPC in my bedroom (see sig).

I suspect the "KILLER" NIC on this MSI Z97 Gaming 7 mobo might be the problem.
I guess I should try streaming any old game from the bedroom to test this theory.
 
10 Mbps is really needed for smooth playback in 1080/60p. But I guess this is a start...
 
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