Trick to rescue data from a dying HDD ..

Discussion in 'SSDs & Data Storage' started by Cov, Aug 2, 2013.

  1. Cov

    Cov Gawd

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    Hi,

    I'm not affected (yet), but I have come across the following information and I just wonder if anyone has actually tried this out:

    source
     
  2. evilsofa

    evilsofa [H]ardForum Junkie

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    Freezing a hard drive will permanently damage it due to condensation, whether or not you put it in a ziplock bag, and does nothing to even temporarily fix the drive, despite anecdotal reports of users who have no idea what they are doing:

    Much more reliable source
     
  3. YeuEmMaiMai

    YeuEmMaiMai [H]ardForum Junkie

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    I've only seen it work once and once it croaked, it was gone. It is much easier to blast the chips with freeezing spray when trying to find a thermal failure.
     
  4. Old Hippie

    Old Hippie [H]ardness Supreme

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    It will work on occasion for MECHANICAL HD problems.

    If you can't determine between mechanical and/or data corruption don't bother.
     
  5. staticlag

    staticlag [H]ard|Gawd

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    One weird trick....
     
  6. patrickdk

    patrickdk Gawd

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    it all depends on the issues yes.

    Always attempt to recover as much as possible first.
    I have mounted large heatsinks/fans onto drives to cool them, sometimes helps recover data, mechanical/bearing issues.

    The freezer trick, has helped me sometimes, but I only attempt this, after I write the drive off as completely failed, and don't attempt to recover any more data. I would not deep freeze the drive though.
     
  7. jojo69

    jojo69 [H]ardForum Junkie

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    this, I have had it unstick a mechanical issue long enough to access the drive one last time

    it is a last ditch strategy but it does sometimes work
     
  8. Cov

    Cov Gawd

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    interesting, .. thanks all for your input.
    Hopefully mechanical hard drives are going to be replaced by non-mechanical sometimes soon.
     
  9. J Macker

    J Macker [H]ardForum Junkie

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    I've frozen a hard drive for 20 mins before. It worked long enough to get the data off.
     
  10. patrickdk

    patrickdk Gawd

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    non-mechanical can be a worse issue to attempt recovery :)

    On a mechanical disk, atleast you can do a logic board swap and give it a shot. but that isn't something you can do on an ssd.
     
  11. Cheetoz

    Cheetoz [H]ard|Gawd

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    Yep, I did it multiple times (on the same drive months in-between)
     
  12. Shockey

    Shockey [H]ard|Gawd

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    I've also heard of someone doing this with a hard drive in raid 5 to recover the array Shocked it worked but it did. :eek:
     
  13. soulwatch5

    soulwatch5 n00b

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    That's a pretty cool trick. Good to know if I ever need to recover data on one of my old drives. As a last resort kind of thing.
     
  14. d50man

    d50man W[H]iskey Lover

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    click of death is which type of failure?
     
  15. bbenz33

    bbenz33 Limp Gawd

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    Click of death is a mechanical failure and is one failure that I have had limited but some success with using this technique to recover data. I was able to freeze the drive pull some data and repeat until most of the data was recovered. As for the person that stated it will permanently damage the drive, I would say that I have not had any issues with it doing that as one of the drives that I performed this trick on actually continued to work "flawlessly" (I noticed no issues) for a while after this. I only continued to use it for a few weeks out of curiousity and once that was over I replaced the drive. However, I will say this is an extremely last resort solution if you don't want to fork over the money to have a professional pull the data off of it.
     
  16. DPI

    DPI Nitpick Police

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    No hopefully people start making backups. If it can store data, nonmechanical or otherwise it can fail. If it uses electricity it can fail/fry.