TPLink Omada sucks balls?

IceDigger

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Feb 22, 2001
Messages
12,095
So I "upgraded" my home networking to an all "Omada" setup and it sucks ass.

Constantly getting drops both on wired and wireless Internets.

ALL hooked into a UPS too.

All firmware is latest too. Replaced the router and switch already and did not fix it.

Never had such issues before with a network setup.

I am using the old cabling too, its cat6 so don't need to replace it.

Setup
OC200 Hardware Controller
605 Router
TL-SG2210MP Switch
3x EAP615 Wifi AP
 
Have you tried adjusting power and channels. Also set a minimum RSI number to help make clients roam to new APs and now hang around.
 
Wow, strange. I've heard really good things about this system, like on par with the ubiquiti stuff. I think you simply might have gotten a dud or don't have it set up correctly.

The other thing that could have happened as I've seen it before, is that the isp just happened to start having problems when you changed to this system. Plug in direct to cable modem/isp equipment and see if you still have the wired issues. If so, isp issue, not yours. (y)
 
I only use TPLink APs, but, with their Omada controller they've been rock solid for me for over a decade.
 
I'll do you one better (I think). I struggled with a shitty Amped Wireless Router for a long time before I got frustrated and threw the damn thing in the trash. The last straw was a firmware update that introduced a new 'feature' to schedule reboots.
 
Have you tried older firmware? Perhaps try to isolate the issue by running just one AP and testing how often the drops occur
 
I'll do you one better (I think). I struggled with a shitty Amped Wireless Router for a long time before I got frustrated and threw the damn thing in the trash. The last straw was a firmware update that introduced a new 'feature' to schedule reboots.
Generally a reboot feature is quite nice on buggy hardware. I actually have a hardware rebooter that I bought for an FVS114 that could reboot in 10 seconds. So if a few pings dropped, it rebooted and we stopped noticing. It was years later when the wan port finally died that it made it to 'the pile'.
 
Generally a reboot feature is quite nice on buggy hardware. I actually have a hardware rebooter that I bought for an FVS114 that could reboot in 10 seconds. So if a few pings dropped, it rebooted and we stopped noticing. It was years later when the wan port finally died that it made it to 'the pile'.

If I had hardware that I needed to reboot to fix a 'problem', I'm getting rid of that hardware because I guarantee someone else is doing it better. As was the case with that Amped router.

After that episode, I ended up going to a PCEngines APU2 running pfSense and it ran 100% reliable for years. I actually only recently stopped using it because it wasn't capable of handling my current internet bandwidth anymore. Got it back in 2016 IIRC.
 
If I had hardware that I needed to reboot to fix a 'problem', I'm getting rid of that hardware because I guarantee someone else is doing it better. As was the case with that Amped router.

After that episode, I ended up going to a PCEngines APU2 running pfSense and it ran 100% reliable for years. I actually only recently stopped using it because it wasn't capable of handling my current internet bandwidth anymore. Got it back in 2016 IIRC.
While I'm with you in spirit, the reality of things today is that nothing is built like it should be and will lock up/get bad/etc and need a reboot. It's why isp support agents have the ability to reboot a cable modem at the other end, a modem for pete's sake--one of the simplest pieces of tech that's existed for several decades now. If a modern modem needs rebooting, more complicated stuff will as well.

Now that being said, there are vast differences in the need for rebooting--like in your example pfsense. Most enterprise grade stuff rarely needs reboots and some older Cisco stuff had uptime in years--it was that reliable. That being said though, even that landscape is changing and reboots are more often, typically coming with software updates. Long uptimes I think are no longer a priority for the manufacturers and because of this if you run something without updates for a longer time, you'll inevitably run into the same lock up/get bad/etc issue and have to reboot it. I have a router that's been on for nearly a year in this situation right now. :( Going to have to reboot it the next time I get out to that site in case it doesn't come back up properly.
 
Back
Top