Topre Type Heaven Keyboard Review @ [H]

FrgMstr

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Topre Type Heaven Keyboard Review - Topre's newest keyboard features a conservative appearance and a standard 104-key keyboard design. The product's custom capacitive key switches are said to provide an extraordinary typing experience and a lengthy product life. If these claims are true, perhaps this keyboard will make its way to your desktop, regardless of its healthy price.
 
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cageymaru

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"Chatting online with friends was exceptional as well. I engaged in a few heated debates and the ensuing thoughts I was having were very easy to type in quick response to the friend was chatting with. I would literally have to wait for him to finish typing his sentences as he backspaced to correct visibly misspelled words. I fired off another two to three sentences and then I would wait again for him to complete his response. If you chat online often, you will definitely finish your end of the conversation very quickly using this keyboard."

So this keyboard would be great for AMD vs Intel and Nvidia vs AMD discussions. :) On a more serious note, I was reading other reviews of the keyboard, and I'm glad you spoke about the spongy feel and not being able to discern if you had done the combo correctly. That's a pretty big deal right there, so I'll skip this keyboard. I have a Razer BlackWidow that the Shift key already lets me down hourly. I don't need more frustration from the next keyboard I choose.

Great article and even better articulation of what gamers should be concerned about and look for in a mechanical keyboard.
 

Mr. Perfect

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Fixed. That is my fault on edit cut and pasting. DOH! - Kyle :eek:
 
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colinstu

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Tried a friend's HHKB once (topre switches) and wasn't impressed. Sure I'd take it over scissor switches or any of that rubber membrane crap, but Cherry/Alps switches are much better (and the IBM buckling springs are the best... what I use now!).

I haven't tried cherry browns but I have used cherry clears... the clears seem similar (but better, and cheaper) than topre switches.
 

Mike89

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This doesn't cut it for me as I need a lighted keyboard. My Deck lighted keyboard is still serving me quite well.
 
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Been a long time since [H] published a keyboard review!

Nice keyboard, but I'm partial to the Ducky Shine 3 TKL & KBT Poker 2.

7Ei0Z4Xl.jpg
 

TechLarry

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This doesn't cut it for me as I need a lighted keyboard. My Deck lighted keyboard is still serving me quite well.

I agree. $150 buys me backlighting for damn sure. I don't care if it is the best keyswitch on the planet.
 

Zarathustra[H]

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I'd love to test the feel of one of these out for myself and compare it to my Model M style buckling spring boards.
 

Gman1979

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This thing looks EXACTLY like the Rosewill keyboard I bought for $25 that has Cherry Red switches. It's almost like they used the exact same enclosure for it.
 

Think

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I got this with some sort of deal a few months back that brought the price down to around $115. At that price, it was worth every penny.

I agree with the findings of the review. For gaming (most of what I do at home) I stick to my trusty Cherry switch keyboards - the Black and Brown switch boards that I have just feel more responsive.

Where this keyboard really shines, however, is for long stretches of coding/data entry/word processing. I work in IT and do lots of typing. I very strongly prefer the feel of the Type Heaven to any mechanical or standard rubber dome keyboard I've ever used. The Type Heaven is well-built, feels hefty, and in the two-ish months of daily use that I've put it through thus far at work, the keycaps are still in the same condition as when I received the board, which is more than I can say for how my Leopold keycaps have held up. Initially I was disappointed, as it feels like a rubber dome keyboard at first, but the more I use it, the more I appreciate its consistency in feel and response, and the solid-but-muted "thwuck" sound the keys make.

TL;DR - the review is right, it's Type Heaven and the Topre keyswitch is great for typing, but Cherry still wins for gaming.
 

GlowingGhoul

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There is no better positive feel and feedback than a buckling spring keyboard, ie, the ones based on IBM Model M switches like Unicomp currently makes.(okay, maybe Model F switches, if you have $400 to buy a used one and can live without Windows keys).

Don't complain about the "noise" these true mechanical keyboards make, just turn the volume up on your pc.
 

Tankerton

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Topre keyboards are very much worth it to me. Think about how much money you spend on hardware that's going to be obsolete soon. This is one of the only parts of the computer you really interact with

  • Can be had with ergonomically weighted keys.
  • Are less fatiguing to type on than even the best Cherry switch.
  • Provide tactile feedback, though they do not click the way Cherry Blues do.

I also recommend tenkeyless for anyone that switches from mouse to keyboard frequently -- any kind of programming. Really helps out ergonomically if you are having any discomfort and should still be more comfortable even if you are not aware of issues. I don't need the key labels let alone back-lighting.
 

Tankerton

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There is no better positive feel and feedback than a buckling spring keyboard, ie, the ones based on IBM Model M switches like Unicomp currently makes.(okay, maybe Model F switches, if you have $400 to buy a used one and can live without Windows keys).

Don't complain about the "noise" these true mechanical keyboards make, just turn the volume up on your pc.

You can get a buckling spring keyboard from Unicomp, which has licensed the patent for around $70 now.
 

Zarathustra[H]

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You can get a buckling spring keyboard from Unicomp, which has licensed the patent for around $70 now.

You need to re-read what he wrote.

He means you can't get anything BETTER than a buckling Spring ModelM/Unicomp keyboard for typing, UNLESS you are willing to spend $400 for a Model F XT keyboard.

I used these when I was a kid, but I can't remember how they felt by modern standards.

Model M style buckling spings (like Unicomp or the real deal) are absolutely delicious to type on though!
 

evilsofa

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Those wanting the Model M feel may wish to look at keyboards with the Cherry MX greens. Here's an article that defines clearly the difference between the various Cherry switches:

http://techreport.com/review/24461/a-first-look-at-cherry-mx-green-key-switches

The difference between Model F and Model M is that Model F is buckling spring over capacitive contact while Model M is buckling spring over membrane switching (which is much easier and cheaper to manufacture). Capacitive contact is 1970s tech while membrane switching is 1980s tech, so if you're wanting a beam spring keyboard, you are hardball old-school. I couldn't possibly comment on whether the capacitive contacts actually feel different or better than membrane switching; we're talking about the stuff under the springs now.

Model F Keyboard info
Beam Spring info
 

Zarathustra[H]

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Those wanting the Model M feel may wish to look at keyboards with the Cherry MX greens. Here's an article that defines clearly the difference between the various Cherry switches:

http://techreport.com/review/24461/a-first-look-at-cherry-mx-green-key-switches

Now THERE's a keyboard I'd love to try for myself. This is the first I've heard of the Cherry MX Greens. For a long time I've wanted a keyboard that feels like a Model M to type on, but has modern features and aesthetics.

It sounds perfect (except for the uneven feel of the shift, cntrl and alt keys, they mention)
 

GlowingGhoul

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I couldn't possibly comment on whether the capacitive contacts actually feel different or better than membrane switching; we're talking about the stuff under the springs now.

Model F Keyboard info
Beam Spring info

The Model F's feel even more solid than the already granite-like Model M's and their modern Unicomp derivatives. That may have more to do with their incredibly high construction quality than the difference between switches. In the day, those Model F keyboards cost over $1000 in today's money! Sure makes the Unicomps seem like a bargain at $70-$100.

The Unicomps use PBT (a high quality polymer) keycaps, so they don't get shiny and lose their grip.

I just wish they had backlit and wireless options. Oh well, at least you can get them in black.

I tell people all the time that the most important components to invest in are a high quality monitor, keyboard, and mouse. Those will likely outlast several PC's and so the premium for high end parts, unlike a processor for instance, will pay for itself because of their long service life. Besides, those are the parts of the computer you constantly interact with, so get the best.
 

sir-gold

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If you want an authentic Model M keyboard for cheap, the best place is at thrift stores like Goodwill. On the rare occasions that they receive a donated Model M, they usually have no idea what it's worth and just toss it in the bin with the rest of the keyboards with a $5-10 price tag on it.

For less than $40 I was able to pick up 4 early-90s model Ms, one of which looked brand spanking new.
 

EarlKeim

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I picked up my first Model-M keyboard at a thrift store in Seattle for $5.00. I bought it as a temporary piece of equipment and ended up using it for five years. Something to be said for that old 90s hardware.........;)
 

IdiotInCharge

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These guys are great: Max Keyboards

Picked up one with MX Browns and white backlighting, with the rubber dampers installed, as an upgrade from a plain Rosewill with MX Browns, and I'm quite happy with it. Puts any rubber dome keyboard to shame, and it's at least as quiet!
 

SGA76

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Just can't beat those old time keyboards.
You could beat an intruder to death with one and if any of the keys had been stuck they'd pop back out good as new!
But seriously..
Big difference between what I like for a gaming keyboard and for a productivity keyboard though I like to keep my mouse the same. Right now my Logitech G510 is good enough for my gaming and any light typing I do at home.
http://www.ianker.com/product/98ANDS2368-BA
Love to see a [H]ard review on it and see how different my tastes are over the people who review hardware for a living. Using it right now and I love everything about it except there's only 2 software profiles.
 

mashie

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For the past 10 years I have been using basic $5 logitech keyboards. I have yet to have any key actually stop working on them. I just replace them every few years when they get too dirty and/or the letters are rubbed off.

I don't see a reason to spend $150 on a keyboard that can't be washed in a dishwasher. Now that feature I would probably pay for.
 
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For the past 10 years I have been using basic $5 logitech keyboards. I have yet to have any key actually stop working on them. I just replace them every few years when they get too dirty and/or the letters are rubbed off.

I don't see a reason to spend $150 on a keyboard that can't be washed in a dishwasher. Now that feature I would probably pay for.

Like another poster mentioned, your keyboard and to an extent your mouse are two of the most permanent pieces of hardware that you will interact with on a daily basis. They are the only interface between you and that multi-thousand dollar desktop you've built (hopefully!). For this reason I wouldn't bat an eye at spending $100-200 on a high-quality keyboard.

I've had my Ducky for over 2 years now and plan on having it another 10.

When I leave the office and go from a cheap-o HP membrane keyboard to my mechanical it's like night and day. In fact, I really need to get a mechanical for my workstation.
 

Zarathustra[H]

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For the past 10 years I have been using basic $5 logitech keyboards. I have yet to have any key actually stop working on them. I just replace them every few years when they get too dirty and/or the letters are rubbed off.

I don't see a reason to spend $150 on a keyboard that can't be washed in a dishwasher. Now that feature I would probably pay for.

The by all means keep doing what you are doing.

If you make the mistake of getting used to a mechanical keyboard you will never be able to go back. Typing on a cheap rubber dome keyboard will feel sortof like typing on a touch screen. Serviceable for short periods of time, but if you want to type anything real, you sit down at a real keyboard :p
 

robble

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My IBM kb-7953 is still going great (I don't know how many years I've had it). The ONLY feature I would like to add to it is back lighting for late night in the dark gaming. Other than that it is perfect.
 

IdiotInCharge

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My IBM kb-7953 is still going great (I don't know how many years I've had it). The ONLY feature I would like to add to it is back lighting for late night in the dark gaming. Other than that it is perfect.
My Max Keyboards Nighthawk X8:

 

Kueller

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On a more serious note, I was reading other reviews of the keyboard, and I'm glad you spoke about the spongy feel and not being able to discern if you had done the combo correctly. That's a pretty big deal right there, so I'll skip this keyboard. I have a Razer BlackWidow that the Shift key already lets me down hourly. I don't need more frustration from the next keyboard I choose.

Great article and even better articulation of what gamers should be concerned about and look for in a mechanical keyboard.

Filco stabs are the best I've encountered fwiw.
 

Zarathustra[H]

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and I actually wonder if anybody here in the forums has tried one of these! ;)

Truly_Ergonomic_Mechanical_Keyboard-207.jpg

I looked it up on the Truly Ergonomic web page. Looks really interesting. $250 is a little steep though, and I wish they had Cherry MX Green switches as an option.
 

qdemn7

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I love my Ducky Shine 2. Waiting to get a Ducky Shine 3. An illuminated keyboard is a must have.
 

MostComfortable

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I truly feel that the Topre Type Heaven keyboard is best for smooth continuous typing, not the start and stop usage scenario that intense PC games require.

The biggest benefit of mechanical keyboards, whether they are Cherry MX or Topre, are with games that require lots of key spam.

The benefit isn't huge for FPS because the keypresses are start and stop. They are VERY useful for RTS or ARTS, games like Starcraft 2 and DOTA 2 that have very high APM. With something like an FPS you're not hammering the keys very fast at all, but in SC2 or DOTA 2 you're going anywhere from 80-200 keypresses a minute (300+ if you're Korean. :) )

Keep this in mind when testing keyboards in the future.
 

EarlKeim

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I understand your thoughts. The difference in gaming with a mechanical based keyboard in comparison to the Topre is this: If I press a key with a mechanical keyboard, I trust my keystroke as I know for certain the depression of the key will be registered. The Type Heaven keyboard always left me with the feeling of "Did it register?" Whether I press 300 or 3 keys, mechanical keyboards leave no doubt in my mind. The Topre did and caused me to second guess myself. Thus, its main purpose is defeated.
 

MostComfortable

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I understand your thoughts. The difference in gaming with a mechanical based keyboard in comparison to the Topre is this: If I press a key with a mechanical keyboard, I trust my keystroke as I know for certain the depression of the key will be registered. The Type Heaven keyboard always left me with the feeling of "Did it register?" Whether I press 300 or 3 keys, mechanical keyboards leave no doubt in my mind. The Topre did and caused me to second guess myself. Thus, its main purpose is defeated.

Interesting, was there doubt because of the lack of a click/bump (which many Cherry switches also lack) or is it because you felt they needed to be bottomed out more than a Cherry switch?
 

Valnar

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So now that Topre has produced a keyboard within the realm of affordability, how does it compare to Cherry switches to those who have tried it? What is the 45g uniform closest to? I've heard more than Brown, but maybe less than Blacks. So does that make it close to a Cherry Clear?
 
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