This guy build a PC out of rope and wood

Discussion in 'Cases & Case Modding' started by Happy Hopping, Apr 19, 2018.

  1. Happy Hopping

    Happy Hopping [H]ardness Supreme

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    There is no fan, no intake or out fan
     
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  2. Mut1ny

    Mut1ny [H]ard|Gawd

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    Very interesting design. I like it as a nice conversation piece.
     
  3. Denpepe

    Denpepe Limp Gawd

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    reminds me of a coffee maker, does look cool though.
     
  4. JargonGR

    JargonGR Limp Gawd

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    I am subscribed to his channel and he makes several interesting things. I would love to build one PC like this for my little daughter but I am currently struggling, time wise, to finish my own PC.
     
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  5. cyclone3d

    cyclone3d [H]ardForum Junkie

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    What about the other bits on the video card that will get burning hot without some air movement over them?
     
  6. JargonGR

    JargonGR Limp Gawd

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    I would certainly add some airflow if it was me. He added copper heatspreaders attached to the cooler base though. Watch the video.
     
  7. Krenum

    Krenum [H]ardForum Junkie

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    That guy can build some cool stuff. I really liked his floating crystal wall decoration.
     
  8. cyclone3d

    cyclone3d [H]ardForum Junkie

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    Right.. but that was just for the RAM and VRMs. Toasting the rest of the components in an air sealed compartment is not a good idea.
     
  9. cjcox

    cjcox Gawd

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    As a kid, I always like the smell of my wood burning kit. This might just bring back memories.
     
  10. CaptNumbNutz

    CaptNumbNutz My Cannon Balls Sunk My Fail Ship

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    The other components on the video card should be fine. Collectively they don't give out enough heat to matter.

    The issue I see is that he did not take the time he did with the video card and do something similar on the motherboard. So the M2 SSD, chipset, and motherboard VRM's are all passively cooled and don't have extra heatpipes or copper heat spreaders added that transfer the heat to the Noctua like he did with the video card. The motherboard is also upside down, so any rising heat is going to get caught in the enclosure.
     
  11. spugm1r3

    spugm1r3 [H]ard|Gawd

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    I would love to see some monitoring of the temperature in the enclosure to back that up. You should expect, for every 1*C increase in ambient, to have a 1*C increase in component temperature. With a space that small, that means all of the components are subjected to an ambient temperature driven by the hottest components, possibly the VRMs.

    With reasonable airflow, your components are never fully subjected to the heat produced by the other components. So the question is: can they handle the increased temperature for prolonged periods?
     
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  12. cyclone3d

    cyclone3d [H]ardForum Junkie

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    In an airtight enclosure they sure do. If the heat can't go anywhere AND there is 0 airflow those parts are going to overheat and fail prematurely.

    The motherboard part of the enclosure isn't sealed. If you watch the video, he says the fan is protruding into the motherboard part of the case in order for airflow to be able to cool the other parts of the motherboard.
     
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  13. CaptNumbNutz

    CaptNumbNutz My Cannon Balls Sunk My Fail Ship

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    We're talking low heat components such as surface mount resistors, capacitors, chokes, and other small IC's. Those barely make any heat as-is and are usually sandwiched underneath the stock heatsink not touching anything at all... also with zero airflow. Next time you peel off the stock heatsink on a video card, take note of what the heatsink and heatspreaders actually touch . They will be easy to spot because they will have thermal paste or a thermal pad on them to facilitate heat transfer and to avoid short circuits touching the bare metal. All those other components under the heatsink are sitting there generating small heat with no airflow... albeit well within operating specs.

    The builder in the video took care of the components that would cause the most heat on the video card already. I'm not saying those low heat components in question wouldn't heat up, its just those few components left would likely not heat up enough under their own power to be outside their operating range even while inside a sealed enclosure like that. Electronics survive much worse conditions than that, proof is in the cellphone in your pocket.

    What I would be interested to see is if the cooling solution he used is able to whisk away enough heat quickly or if some of that residual heat from those high heat components (GPU, VRAM, VRM's) will still get trapped and affect the low heat components (SMD resistors, capacitors, chokes, IC's).

    I do agree though, his design is slick enough he could have snuck in a couple cleverly hidden vents that wouldn't let much of that coil whine sound out that he was so scared of.

    Good catch. However, there are sides on that enclosure that the airflow would have to fight. It would be trivial for that fan to overcome that if it was sped up to higher RPM. I also didn't see which M2 slot he used, be it the one on the top of the motherboard or on the back. If he used the one on the back, he could have issues.

    I still think he should have done a similar copper heatpipe/heatspreader arrangement that transfers some of the heat from VRM's, chipset, and SSD to the main CPU heatsink.
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2018
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