Thinking about building a NAS, have some questions.

Overblod

Limp Gawd
Joined
Mar 28, 2018
Messages
173
I could really use a NAS so that different DVRs and Media servers can use a common storage. Retail price of the NAS seems to be pretty high so thinking about using desktop (2400G) or a Pi 3, both are sitting unused. Main question is, I have multiple 4TB HDDs, all desktop drives or "surveillance" drives, not "NAS" rated, is it okay to use these drives for home NAS? If I use the desktop, they will be connected to the SATA port or I use Pi it will be in a 2 bay USB dock.
Which is a better idea? Pi or 2400G? I would prefer the Pi due the to potential low power usage. As far as the OS goes, I have no preference, but as I have never done it before, it will be a steep learning curve, but I have the time and I am ready for the challenge.
 

iroc409

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Jun 17, 2006
Messages
1,339
The 2400G is going to make for a better server. The Pi 3 is really limited in its connectivity for storage: it basically only has USB (2?) and 100Mb Ethernet, which will really limit its capability. While the Pi 3 is good for a lot of little server type things, it is drastically slower than a typical x86 and it's noticeable (even thought in many cases the Pi is adequate). If those performance limitations are acceptable to you, the Pi is OK.

Standard drives are OK, but it kind of depends. If you're looking to put it in some sort of RAID, NAS drives avoid some of the TLER problems that normal drives encounter, and I believe they are built to reduce the compounded vibration issues that can arise using standard drives in large chassis arrays. If you're just going to hang them off a computer as individual shares it won't make a difference.
 

warhol76

n00b
Joined
Jan 1, 2013
Messages
63
I would agree with iroc409. If you plan to only use it for storage and don't mind if it is slow. Then the pi might be ok. WOuld certainly be a fun project (if you look at it that way.) But I would definitely go with the 2400g. That will give you lots of options and ability to expand.

Those surveillance drives are probably ok. They are far from ideal. But, they will work.
 

Overblod

Limp Gawd
Joined
Mar 28, 2018
Messages
173
The 2400G is going to make for a better server. The Pi 3 is really limited in its connectivity for storage: it basically only has USB (2?) and 100Mb Ethernet, which will really limit its capability. While the Pi 3 is good for a lot of little server type things, it is drastically slower than a typical x86 and it's noticeable (even thought in many cases the Pi is adequate). If those performance limitations are acceptable to you, the Pi is OK.

Standard drives are OK, but it kind of depends. If you're looking to put it in some sort of RAID, NAS drives avoid some of the TLER problems that normal drives encounter, and I believe they are built to reduce the compounded vibration issues that can arise using standard drives in large chassis arrays. If you're just going to hang them off a computer as individual shares it won't make a difference.
Thanks for the input. Thinking about going the PI route, what could go wrong, worst case, I will have to tear it down and go with 2400G. Not planning on RAID at this point, it will be just one drive, 4TB WD Blue
 

Hakaba

Gawd
Joined
Jul 22, 2013
Messages
726
For OS, Unraid is extremely simple and has a large community making dockers/plugins for additional features. It’s software raid can consist of mixed drives and has a max of two parity drives? Also, the OS can run the drives as JBOD. Has a cost associated to it though.

Ubuntu is just as capable on the software side for apps/dockers, not sure on running RAID on mixed disk. You would just need to configure Samba or NFS (not sure what your devices use). One of the biggest support communities, should be able to find almost any answer you seek.

On the Pi route I believe they have top hats with SATA connectors, if you are going the USB route just make sure it’s compatible. Also, I’ve seen some NAS like cases before where the PO and HD are mounted together.
 

WackyWRZ

n00b
Joined
Mar 3, 2016
Messages
33
Have to 100% agree with Unraid here. Although it isn't free, it's super simple to set things up and the community support / applications is great. I used to run a full home lab with ESXi boxes and all sorts of gear, but since installing Unraid and it being so simple and reliable, I got rid of everything else. Spaceinvader One has a bunch of YouTube videos on setting it up and other things that can be done for examples.

You can also run VMs and Dockers on it, so it can also serve as a media server. And you can add drives whenever as long as they're smaller or equal to the largest parity drive. I had mine running on a Pentium G5600 for over a year, using the iGPU for Plex transcoding. And at idle it was only pulling around 30w.
 
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