These are Not the Zero Days You are Looking For

bobdabilder

Limp Gawd
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Oct 7, 2009
Messages
291
Hey, stop with all this microsoft hate you hating haters...................
On second thought, i think it's a pr stunt as well.
 

Schtask

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436
"Most" vulnerabilities is not "All" vulnerabilities. It only takes 1

True to point....But...

"Of the three remaining exploits, “EnglishmanDentist”, “EsteemAudit”, and “ExplodingCan”, none reproduces on supported platforms, which means that customers running Windows 7 and more recent versions of Windows or Exchange 2010 and newer versions of Exchange are not at risk. Customers still running prior versions of these products are encouraged to upgrade to a supported offering."
 
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Schtask

Limp Gawd
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Many of these tools are custom tailored to Target specifics... Won't work on everything, but work on where and on what you need them to. For the *CIA at least.
 
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nutzo

Supreme [H]ardness
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7,380
This is why you need to be running "supported" OS's.

Maybe people will finally upgrade to Windows 10 when they stop issuing patches for Windows 7.
 

lcpiper

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"Most" vulnerabilities is not "All" vulnerabilities. It only takes 1


Oh not so.

ALL of the unpatched and existing vulnerabilities could effect out-of-data applications or services that are no longer in use in current supported systems.

It only takes 1 ..... applicable vulnerability.
 

lcpiper

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Hmmm, a CIA hacking tool bag that is full of WinXP hacks?

Why is what I am thinking.

https://www.neowin.net/news/statcou...st-used-os-in-eight-countries-including-china


While that's the worldwide share, StatCounter also offers information on how much operating systems are used in each country and territory across the globe. In data posted on its website, it shows the eight countries and territories where Windows XP is still the number one most used OS:

  • China - 54.79%
  • Cook Islands - 72.14%
  • Cuba - 52.93%
  • Eritrea - 58.25%
  • North Korea - 61.47%
  • Morocco - 44.66%
  • Norfolk Island - 70.18%
  • Vietnam - 44.33%
And the list continues and is quite long.

Hmmm, nobody here the CIA would ever want to hack :sneaky:
 

lcpiper

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I'm thinking many of these tools are custom tailored to Target specifics... Won't work on everything, but work on where and on what you need them to. For the NSA at least.


Uuuhhhuuummm. CIA, it was a CIA thing. ..... shhss :whistle:



Ohh, and our scanners at work report that we have Win2000 machines on the network. It's not true, we have NetApp storage systems that are serving up some File Shares using the CIFS protocol. The scan assumes the OS is Win2000 because it looks for anything on the network that will respond to a CIFS request and claims that it's a Win2000 machine because MS stopped using CIFS after Win2000.

So the scanner reports the Win2000 machines on the network, and the IPs for the machines, then the IT team explains that those IPs belong to the NetApp filers, and that there is no vulnerability native to the CIFS protocol that we haven't mitigated, and next month we do the same stupid dance again.
 
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Schtask

Limp Gawd
Joined
Nov 29, 2011
Messages
436
Uuuhhhuuummm. CIA, it was a CIA thing. ..... shhss :whistle:



Ohh, and our scanners at work report that we have Win2000 machines on the network. It's not true, we have NetApp storage systems that are serving up some File Shares using the CIFS protocol. The scan assumes the OS is Win2000 because it looks for anything on the network that will respond to a CIFS request and claims that it's a Win2000 machine because MS stopped using CIFS after Win2000.

So the scanner reports the Win2000 machines on the network, and the IPs for the machines, then the IT team explains that those IPs belong to the NetApp filers, and that there is no vulnerability native to the CIFS protocol that we haven't mitigated, and next month we do the same stupid dance again.

Suppress! Suppress!
 

trudude

[H]ard|Gawd
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Messages
1,647
First off all of the exploits were intentionally put there in the first place. Second without a doubt there are additional exploits that are still live that will only be "fixed" if they are discovered or if a whistleblower outs them. Third all major operating systems have back doors built into them for the sole purpose of giving access to the 3 letter agencies. All major operating systems could be nearly impenetrable if not for meddling from the US Federal government.

Edit: The reasons the 3 letter agencies give for the ability to backdoor into any operating system is to combat child pornography and to fight the war on terrorism...the real reason is for industrial espionage. They literally use the back doors to break into tech companies and steal trade secrets.
 
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lcpiper

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First off all of the exploits were intentionally put there in the first place. Second without a doubt there are additional exploits that are still live that will only be "fixed" if they are discovered or if a whistleblower outs them. Third all major operating systems have back doors built into them for the sole purpose of giving access to the 3 letter agencies. All major operating systems could be nearly impenetrable if not for meddling from the US Federal government.

Edit: The reasons the 3 letter agencies give for the ability to backdoor into any operating system is to combat child pornography and to fight the war on terrorism...the real reason is for industrial espionage. They literally use the back doors to break into tech companies and steal trade secrets.


Intentionally put there in the first place .... to what purpose?

If all major operating systems have back doors built into them, ........................ why do they need to hack them?

Nothing is impenetrable if you have physical access. That's why the Federal Government, (DoD), put's their shit inside buildings that don't have windows and are essentially giant Faraday cages, with guards and guns and shit, and then they put up additionally satellites just for their classified networks and nothing else, and why there is no common hardware between the networks, etc. Not because there are engineered backdoors, but because they know this shit is never completely secure.

And who are they busy conducting industrial espionage on?

Let me guess, are they looking for the secret recipe for Coke-a-Cola? Or is it the schematics and manufacturing tolerances for France's Dassault Rafale (for example), which they sell to everyone in the world that will write them a check?

The Rafale has been marketed for export to several countries, and it has been selected for purchase by the Indian Air Force, the Egyptian Air Force, and the Qatar Air Force.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dassault_Rafale

Now I'm not saying that the US isn't pretty liberal about who they will sell too, but who wouldn't try and get a leg up on the competition when it comes to building weapons.

Let me continue guessing and making up examples, would we be more interested in how Dessault solved the problems with the flux-capacitor, or what the capabilities, limitations, and vulnerabilities of their flux-capacitor are?

The Russians built the ZSU-23-4 Anti-Aircraft tank for close defense of armored vehicles and troops. The guns had a specific range and armor penetration capability. The US built the Apache Gunship and gave it armor to take hits from 23mm guns and stand-off weapons capabilities to let them kill tanks from outside the range of the ZSU-s guns. Then the Russians developed the 2S-6 with 30mm guns and AAA missiles so the US is working on new helicopters so we can safely kill Russian Tanks without being shot up. It's a never ending game of one-up-manship. Gathering intelligence is a major part of determining what our enemies, or the equipment being sold to our enemies, are capable of.

So it's never ever only been about kiddie porn and terrorism. If you think that they have to use them as a justification, you are mistaken. I'm sorry, but I calls it as I sees it. Anyone with some knowledge of these things and a little common sense knows that they don't need to justify any of this shit. They already have all the justification that they actually need. They don't have to manufacture any other justification. They are just telling the "uninformed" what they want to hear. It's OK that you see through the deception so clearly. But your falling a little short of the mark by thinking that it's a "justification" when they already have all the legitimate need and authority that they require. Think of "kiddie-porn and terrorism as a euphemism for the unsaid.
 

lcpiper

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Nope, they aren't. That said, I think this Microsoft declaration was bullshit intended on distracting attention to the vulnerabilities exposed.


Because MS is worried about how vulnerable non-supported software is?

Or is it because you think they are covering up other vulnerabilities in current supported software?

I am asking cause I don't think it's bullshit at all.

Let's say I am the big dog at the CIA running all this activity. Now I have half the world still running XP and I know that it's an easy target to hit. Low hanging fruit, there is a ton of data and can take and it doesn't even required my top guys to get it done. I don't have to hack domain controllers, go through some tricky CISCO router hacks, nothing crazy.

So I can separate these activities. I can have an "A" Team and a "B" Team and while the "A" Team is doing the hard stuff, hacking the hard targets, using the more "secret" tools and exploits because they are working on the tougher systems and networks. And my "B" Team can take care of that low hanging fruit.

if it were me ...
 
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viscountalpha

2[H]4U
Joined
Oct 16, 2011
Messages
2,618
All the good stuff is still out there. Some of us like causing mischief an others actually do some serious harm.

I see it like this, if you get serious hit by someone, you were asking for it.
 

Schtask

Limp Gawd
Joined
Nov 29, 2011
Messages
436
Intentionally put there in the first place .... to what purpose?

If all major operating systems have back doors built into them, ........................ why do they need to hack them?

Nothing is impenetrable if you have physical access. That's why the Federal Government, (DoD), put's their shit inside buildings that don't have windows and are essentially giant Faraday cages, with guards and guns and shit, and then they put up additionally satellites just for their classified networks and nothing else, and why there is no common hardware between the networks, etc. Not because there are engineered backdoors, but because they know this shit is never completely secure.

And who are they busy conducting industrial espionage on?

Let me guess, are they looking for the secret recipe for Coke-a-Cola? Or is it the schematics and manufacturing tolerances for France's Dassault Rafale (for example), which they sell to everyone in the world that will write them a check?


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dassault_Rafale

Now I'm not saying that the US isn't pretty liberal about who they will sell too, but who wouldn't try and get a leg up on the competition when it comes to building weapons.

Let me continue guessing and making up examples, would we be more interested in how Dessault solved the problems with the flux-capacitor, or what the capabilities, limitations, and vulnerabilities of their flux-capacitor are?

The Russians built the ZSU-23-4 Anti-Aircraft tank for close defense of armored vehicles and troops. The guns had a specific range and armor penetration capability. The US built the Apache Gunship and gave it armor to take hits from 23mm guns and stand-off weapons capabilities to let them kill tanks from outside the range of the ZSU-s guns. Then the Russians developed the 2S-6 with 30mm guns and AAA missiles so the US is working on new helicopters so we can safely kill Russian Tanks without being shot up. It's a never ending game of one-up-manship. Gathering intelligence is a major part of determining what our enemies, or the equipment being sold to our enemies, are capable of.

So it's never ever only been about kiddie porn and terrorism. If you think that they have to use them as a justification, you are mistaken. I'm sorry, but I calls it as I sees it. Anyone with some knowledge of these things and a little common sense knows that they don't need to justify any of this shit. They already have all the justification that they actually need. They don't have to manufacture any other justification. They are just telling the "uninformed" what they want to hear. It's OK that you see through the deception so clearly. But your falling a little short of the mark by thinking that it's a "justification" when they already have all the legitimate need and authority that they require. Think of "kiddie-porn and terrorism as a euphemism for the unsaid.

If only those who host sensitive data were as diligent as those looking to retrieve it. I tried FOR YEARS to get various rapid prototyping firms to secure their shit. One 3D Printing machine has thousands of CAD .stl files that pass through it a year. Those prints are accurate to .001 of the original drawings and contains precise X and Y geometry for every layer.

Not even mentioning Booze Allen Hamilton and their affinity for leaving laptops with TS data in the front seat of their cars. Sometimes I feel as though our inability to secure the human will keep us in an uphill state of battle perpetuity.

As for your thoughts on military espionage... Hell yes. Cyber Warfare is real. It has to be. Chinese Silkworms are a threat to the fleet. Enter CIWS and NSSMS. Silkworms become Sunburners. CIWS and NSSMS become RAM and ESSMS. Sunburners become Exocet III's. ESSMS gets supplemented with BG SM2s and 3's. It goes on forever. We need it to though. Our intelligence MUST keep us a step ahead...Or at least in lock step with our enemies.

Of course we have tools that will accomplish this. Backdoors with the manufacturer? Maybe. If it were that easy though, Stuxnet wouldn't have made the splash it did...Self replicating into the open net and all. Anyway.. Yes, on all points.
 

RaxusCraxurFace

Weaksauce
Joined
May 22, 2015
Messages
95
First off all of the exploits were intentionally put there in the first place. Second without a doubt there are additional exploits that are still live that will only be "fixed" if they are discovered or if a whistleblower outs them. Third all major operating systems have back doors built into them for the sole purpose of giving access to the 3 letter agencies. All major operating systems could be nearly impenetrable if not for meddling from the US Federal government.

Edit: The reasons the 3 letter agencies give for the ability to backdoor into any operating system is to combat child pornography and to fight the war on terrorism...the real reason is for industrial espionage. They literally use the back doors to break into tech companies and steal trade secrets.

You should get up to speed on Vault 7, in reference to your edit. It would be nice if it were to just battle child porn and terrorism, and not getting preferred foreign political candidates elected(2012 french election), spying on average citizens, creating databases for people who wrong think, spoof cyber attacks to get nations pissed off at each other, etc etc
 

windianrecords

Limp Gawd
Joined
Feb 25, 2016
Messages
380
Uuuhhhuuummm. CIA, it was a CIA thing. ..... shhss :whistle:



Ohh, and our scanners at work report that we have Win2000 machines on the network. It's not true, we have NetApp storage systems that are serving up some File Shares using the CIFS protocol. The scan assumes the OS is Win2000 because it looks for anything on the network that will respond to a CIFS request and claims that it's a Win2000 machine because MS stopped using CIFS after Win2000.

So the scanner reports the Win2000 machines on the network, and the IPs for the machines, then the IT team explains that those IPs belong to the NetApp filers, and that there is no vulnerability native to the CIFS protocol that we haven't mitigated, and next month we do the same stupid dance again.

What program do y'all use that enumerates the target host's OS so poorly?
 

lcpiper

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If only those who host sensitive data were as diligent as those looking to retrieve it. ............................

Of course we have tools that will accomplish this. Backdoors with the manufacturer? Maybe. If it were that easy though, Stuxnet wouldn't have made the splash it did...Self replicating into the open net and all. Anyway.. Yes, on all points.

I think that it couldn't have been an unforeseeable event that Stuxnet would eventually get loose. A bunch of broken equipment, infected and needing repair, someone was going to bring in outside software to try and fix them and have their media infected and thus the rescuers become vectors for infection. So if you already know, or should have foreseen), that Stuxnet would get loose, a wise person would have already prepared for it with good definitions and cleaning tools, lest your own creation return home to it's makers.
 

lcpiper

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Its the same thing with all the companies saying the Vault 7 exploits have been patched. Bullshit!

How are you so sure ?

Understand, I am not out and out saying you are wrong. But you are making a big claim and I just want to know why,. What source of information you have that gives you reason to say this.
 
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lcpiper

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What program do y'all use that enumerates the target host's OS so poorly?

It's either ACAS or Nessus. And although IA isn't my big thing I think the Nessus scanner is a software package belonging to ACAS which is a collection of security tools all bundled together for the Army. It also has SCAP scanning and other tools.
 
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windianrecords

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It's either ACAS or Nessus. And although IA isn't my big thing I think the Nessus scanner is a software package belonging to ACAS which is a collection of security tools all bundled together for the Army. It also has SCAP scanning and other tools.

Yup, I know Nessus quite well - your HPES ACAS support people should put in a case to Tenable for that, or whomever manages the ACAS plugin feed, as the standard customer plugin feed has had the CIFS / OS Enumeration fixed for a while. I know this is a little off-tangent, but that sounds annoying and Tenable's always fixed plugins for us when they enumerate stuff wrong before...
 

RaxusCraxurFace

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How are you so sure ?

Understand, I am not out and out saying you are wrong. But you are making a big claim and I just want to know why,. What source of information you have that gives you reason to say this.

The source is myself.

Since the podesta e-mails I spend pretty much all of my free time reading wikileaks. Vault 7 is pretty horrifying. Even if they were telling the truth and those exploits were patched there's a whole new batch that aren't. All of these companies are working hand in hand with our three letter agencies for total mass surveillance of the American people.

I really wish more people would take the time to take a look at just what the hell is going on in the world right now........I better stop here or I'm going to get hit for political posting again.
 

lcpiper

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The source is myself.

Since the podesta e-mails I spend pretty much all of my free time reading wikileaks. Vault 7 is pretty horrifying. Even if they were telling the truth and those exploits were patched there's a whole new batch that aren't. All of these companies are working hand in hand with our three letter agencies for total mass surveillance of the American people.

I really wish more people would take the time to take a look at just what the hell is going on in the world right now........I better stop here or I'm going to get hit for political posting again.


Wait, what is horrifying about Vault7?

You do understand that the CIA does have a real world wide intelligence mission and that there is nothing at all about any of this that suggests the CIA was doing anything illegal or outside of the job that they are supposed to be doing.

It's like saying that it's terrifying ........ we found an Army motor pool and would you belief, they have tanks ! and guns !, the horror !

You get what I am saying?
 

RaxusCraxurFace

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Wait, what is horrifying about Vault7?

You do understand that the CIA does have a real world wide intelligence mission and that there is nothing at all about any of this that suggests the CIA was doing anything illegal or outside of the job that they are supposed to be doing.

It's like saying that it's terrifying ........ we found an Army motor pool and would you belief, they have tanks ! and guns !, the horror !

You get what I am saying?

Yeah I follow, but I don't think you understand the extent of the surveillance and what is being done with it. Yes i know they are going to have tools to hack into things, going to have malware, viruses, whatever, its to be expected. What I have a problem with is the extent to which these things are done to the American people with no oversight whatsoever. No warrants, not even a damn FISA warrant which gets turned down less than 1% of the time. Our spy agencies were never meant to be used against us, and that is exactly what is happening.

It is no longer unreasonable to expect that any sort of communication that is done electronically is recorded and stored. In fact I would say its foolish to expect anything other than that. Any windows machine, smart tv, smart phone, almost any smart device, once you dig deep into all of this stuff and start tying things together yes it is terrifying. The only reason I think that some people don't find it terrifying is that they believe that the government is good, has good intentions, and is looking out for the best interests of its people. After being in the millitary, and things I did after I was out I have zero faith in the governments goodness or that it has our best interests at heart.

If you want to talk more on this do it in DM please, I don't want to get in trouble for political talk.
 

Zion Halcyon

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Its the same thing with all the companies saying the Vault 7 exploits have been patched. Bullshit!

Precisely. It's why I can't take Icypiper's rebuttal seriously. There is enough ammunition now that everything we do is surveiled, that all the encryption we use for privacy is easily gotten around as the data is taken before the encryption takes place, and that the CIA paid money to CISCO, Microsoft and others to leave vulnerabilities in so that the agency can take advantage.

So now I am expected to believe that an organization that was COMPLICIT with the surveillance of US citizens was able to quickly say "oh never mind we fixed those already!"

Yeah right - if you believe that, then as the old saying goes, I got a bridge in Brooklyn that I can sell ya, even give you the "nice guy" discount...
 
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