The perfect 4K 43” monitor! Soon! Asus XG438Q ROG

kasakka

[H]ard|Gawd
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Aug 25, 2008
Messages
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I was actually sitting very far from the Asus already, and much closer to the LG, but the LG just has much better clarity overall! I almost feel like it has higher resolution than the Asus even though it is a lower pixel count.

Reason why I say the LG is more vibrant is because alot of the colors really pop! I like that alot, yeah the Asus has better contrast ratio, and I did think the image looked good on that Asus too but the LG nano-IPS vibrancy of the colors really won me over on the image quality front too. Colors look more solid, and not so soft as it did on the Asus.

I am finding it easier to spot very distant targets in PUBG much better with the LG. Is it because of the better clarity, higher ppi or something? On the Asus, any distant targets were very hard to spot because it appeared blurry, almost like a little blurry dot. On the LG, I can definitely tell an enemy in the distance if i spot it, much clearer to see. Would the BGR pixel layout have anything to do with that, or does that only effect text?
It should only matter for text. It might be different settings or sitting closer to the screen or the better motion clarity.
 

Panel

Limp Gawd
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Nov 24, 2016
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the LG is more vibrant is because alot of the colors really pop! I like that alot, yeah the Asus has better contrast ratio, and I did think the image looked good on that Asus too but the LG nano-IPS vibrancy of the colors really won me over on the image quality front too. Colors look more solid, and not so soft as it did on the Asus.
I'm also just now realizing, after moving to a modern IPS display, just how much people underplay the colors on these things. Yes, the contrast isn't all there, but man, vibrancy clearly plays a bigger role than I thought (at least to some people), because my new LG IPS pops more than a lot of high end VA's. I'd say overall image quality is on par with them, if not somewhat higher. And mine doesn't even use nano-IPS, it's just the normal stuff. I wouldn't call myself an IPS evangelist, but until OLED comes around everywhere (who knows when that'll happen), I'm more than content with it.
 

elvn

2[H]4U
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Regarding "PoP" .. I bumped the vibrancy up a few % on my LG 32gk850g (VA screen) some even at the price of accuracy since I mostly use it for gaming. You can also use nvidia freestyle if on a nvidia GPU. Freestyle via a hotkey pops up an overlay of slider controls on the left side of the screen during a game which allows you to adjust a bunch of different filters including the saturation, contrast, sharpness, etc on the fly both plus and minus which allows some interesting results. It will remember your settings on a per game basis. It's sort of like an easy-mode reshade and was written with the help of the author of reshade. A good thing about freestyle is that when you exit the game back to your desktop, your desktop settings are preserved. So you can amp up your games without making your desktop/apps look any different, and you can make a very dark game, colorful isometric, bitmap/indie game, etc. look a lot different than each other settings wise to enhance the look considering the limitations on practically all monitors... some weaker than others in certain areas.


Nividia Freestyle.

https://www.geforce.com/en_GB/gfecn...ansel-enhancements-geforce-experience-article


Nvidia supports several hundred games with freestyle directly and now it also supports reshade shaders natively.

https://reshade.me/forum/general-discussion/5960-reshade-shaders-in-nvidia-freestyle-gfe

https://github.com/crosire/reshade-shaders/tree/nvidia

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I dropped out on these 43" monitors. Personally I'll never go back to 870:1 to 1000:1 contrast ratios and the accompanying black depths of TN and IPS that are being mentioned in this thread. At least some of these larger monitors are VA though which made this xg438q's 3800:1 contrast ratio and .03 black depth tempting. Pricing , features, and lack of hdmi 2.1 / dp 2, FALD, etc... resulted in me deciding that I'm instead going to hold out for the LG CX 48" OLED and hdmi 2.1, 3080ti gpu as upgrades at this point. I'm also heavily leaning toward VR now after getting my feet wet with an oculus quest (with quest link to my pc) since the holidays. I'm hoping the eventual next generation of VR headsets in the next few years has much higher resolution. high FoV as standard in more models as well as higher bandwidth connectors and high Hz.
 
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kasakka

[H]ard|Gawd
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I'm not a big fan of hdr 600, wish they had bumpe it up to big boy brightness.
That's not useful if you don't have an equally good local dimming solution. HDR1000 with minimal dimming zones is no better than HDR600. Even though for example OLEDs have a peak brightness of about 700-800 nits in HDR, due to per pixel local dimming the end result looks better than LCDs capable of much higher brightness.
 

elvn

2[H]4U
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May 5, 2006
Messages
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Agreed. Quoting some specifics on the c9 in relation to the percent of the screen below:

Yes I'm saying that games use hybrid log gamma where you can move the white point and gamma brighter which can make things out of bounds one extreme or the other. IDK of much content that would blast max nits fullscreen sustained unless it was a poorly done game with a bad white point/gamma scale.

A 800nit or higher peak is impossible on OLEDs outside of peak 10% window of highlights and before ABL kicks in.

A C9 OLED's HDR can only do
Fullscreen peak/burst: 301 nit ... Fullscreen sustained: 286 nit
50% peak/burst: 530nit ... 50% sustained: 506nit
25% peak/burst: 845nit ... 25% sustained: 802nit
10% peak/burst: 855nit .. 10% sustained: 814nit

A Samsung Q90's HDR for comparison since it's LED LCD and very bright
Fullscreen peak/burst: 536 nit ... Fullscreen sustained: 532 nit
50% peak/burst: 816nit ... 50% sustained: 814nit
25% peak/burst: 1275nit ... 25% sustained: 1235nit
10% peak/burst: 1487nit .. 10% sustained: 1410nit



For comparison

200w bulb = ~ 3000
100 W = 1600 lumen
75 w = 800 lumen
40 w = 450 lumen


However think of HDR normally sort of like having a screen size slide of film with varied levels of transparency that the light is shining through, of which the brightest pass throughs are mostly highlights of bright colors. On SDR screens and low peak nit HDR screens those colors would be clipped to white or rolled down from at a much lower color volume ceiling.

Then consider that the locations are often moving. The glint of a rifle barrel, the oscillating reflections of the sun on water, moving cars, etc too. And if you are in a virtual reality type of scenario while gaming, you probably shouldn't stare directly into the sun or a nuclear blast for too long eh?


HDR 10,000 is the benchmark for the most realism. Even HDR 1000 as a content set point is fractional HDR. There are a lot of hdr 1000 uhd discs, a bunch at hdr4000 and only 1 or 2 afaik that are 10,000 because noone has the hardware to play them yet at those levels. Some games can also technically do hdr10,000 when tested with color maps.


https://www.theverge.com/2014/1/6/5276934/dolby-vision-the-future-of-tv-is-really-really-bright

"The problem is that the human eye is used to seeing a much wider range in real life. The sun at noon is about 1.6 billion nits, for example, while starlight comes in at a mere .0001 nits; the highlights of sun reflecting off a car can be hundreds of times brighter than the vehicle’s hood. The human eye can see it all, but when using contemporary technology that same range of brightness can’t be accurately reproduced. You can have rich details in the blacks or the highlights, but not both.


So Dolby basically threw current reference standards away. "Our scientists and engineers said, ‘Okay, what if we don’t have the shackles of technology that’s not going to be here [in the future],’" Griffis says, "and we could design for the real target — which is the human eye?" To start the process, the company took a theatrical digital cinema projector and focused the entire image down onto a 21-inch LCD panel, turning it into a jury-rigged display made up of 20,000 nit pixels. Subjects were shown a series of pictures with highlights like the sun, and then given the option to toggle between varying levels of brightness. Dolby found that users wanted those highlights to be many hundreds of times brighter than what normal TVs can offer: the more like real life, the better.
"
 
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