The HTC 5G Hub Will Bring Cloud-Based Virtual Reality to the Home

cageymaru

Fully [H]
Joined
Apr 10, 2003
Messages
20,402
The new HTC 5G Hub harnesses the power of 5G technology to bring cloud-based virtual reality to the home. For example, this will allow HTC Vive owners to stream VR content from the cloud to their headsets. No PC or cables will be required. Other features include 4K video streaming, low-latency gaming, ability to connect up to 20 devices, and faster networks.

Enjoy ultra-low-latency, 60fps, and 4K resolution--gaming at its finest--with the HTC 5G Hub. Combining the processing power of Qualcomm Snapdragon 855 Mobile Platform with Android 9 Pie, the HTC 5G Hub allows for unprecedented data speeds and power for native Android and PC games supported on the largest of screens. *PC gaming compatibility available only through third party applications.
 

sadsteve

Gawd
Joined
Oct 1, 2010
Messages
575
Yeah, I'll believe in 5G when I see it. And even if it does work as well as all the hype, you know you'll have data caps (unless your watching content provided by your ISP).
 

ND40oz

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Jul 31, 2005
Messages
12,152
Yeah, I'll believe in 5G when I see it. And even if it does work as well as all the hype, you know you'll have data caps (unless your watching content provided by your ISP).

I already have uncapped LTE using a Netgear MR1100, just tested at 155 down and 60 up. 5G will be even better. ISPs will know where their customers are and what towers that they are going to be connected to, just like DSLAM works for VDSL.
 

Zarathustra[H]

Fully [H]
Joined
Oct 29, 2000
Messages
31,890
More of this 5G nonsense.

I've posted this before, but it bears repeating.

The industry is falling over itself to praise 5G as the second coming of Christ and how it is going to revolutionize everything, but that just isn't the truth.

The preliminary 5G spec has two frequency ranges.

Frequency Range 1, the sub 6Ghz bands is where typical cell tower spectrum resides. There is very little room for improvement here, so in real terms, bandwidth will only increase between 15%-50%, and probably closer to the lower range over current LTE-Advanced.

Where the "revolutionary" bandwidth increases come, is in Frequency Range 2, which is in the 24-86Ghz range. This is millimeter wave territory. We are talking 40Gbit/s bandwidth here, which really could change things, but there are two very large and insurmountable problems. The more you increase the frequency, the less penetration you get, and the shorter range you get. Millimeter waves in this frequency are estimated to have ranges of less than a couple of hundred yards, and only that if they have perfect line of sight. If anything what so ever gets between the tower and the device communicating with it, you'll pretty much lose signal right away.

In other words, all the promise of 5G comes in Frequency Range 2, but it is pretty much useless due to range and line of sight issues.

This leaves Frequency Range 1, which is essentially an incremental improvement of 15-50% over LTE-Advanced.

5G is a small, marginal improvement. It is not revolutionary. Someone should sue all the CEO's and telecom thought leaders for making it seem like it will change the world. It won't.
 

PeaKr

Gawd
Joined
Sep 6, 2004
Messages
884
I already have uncapped LTE using a Netgear MR1100, just tested at 155 down and 60 up. 5G will be even better. ISPs will know where their customers are and what towers that they are going to be connected to, just like DSLAM works for VDSL.

Whats your latency like? Be honest.
 

ND40oz

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Jul 31, 2005
Messages
12,152
Whats your latency like? Be honest.

Here's a fresh one:

upload_2019-2-26_23-35-35.png
 

ND40oz

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Jul 31, 2005
Messages
12,152
Better than I expected. Still, 3% packet loss! :eek:

Is this your typical actual use latency, or is it just low due to the speedtest server being really close?

Actually that one was about 100 miles away, here's one that's only 20.

upload_2019-2-26_23-57-17.png
 

Zarathustra[H]

Fully [H]
Joined
Oct 29, 2000
Messages
31,890
17ms latency on a VR headset is making my stomach churn already

Unless they do it differently. They could render the 360 degree view remotely, and then do all head tracking within that 360 degree render locally.

This should prevent the nausea inducing delay to head movement. You'll still have some latency moving back and forth, but that - I believe - is less likely to cause nausea.
 

Geef

Limp Gawd
Joined
Aug 5, 2009
Messages
338
Isn't this thing a Switch or a Router? A hub is for the physical connection. A hub sends out all data back out to every single connection it has. If that was happening then the speed of this thing would be LOW.
 

Shadowed

Limp Gawd
Joined
Mar 21, 2018
Messages
506
I often wonder when 144hz streaming will become a reality. I tried recording a 144hz video of a game before, and my SSD choked at the bitrate I used for 60fps. The software I used was awfully old though.
 

Zarathustra[H]

Fully [H]
Joined
Oct 29, 2000
Messages
31,890
I often wonder when 144hz streaming will become a reality. I tried recording a 144hz video of a game before, and my SSD choked at the bitrate I used for 60fps. The software I used was awfully old though.

Sounds like my experience trying to record analog video off of a camcorder onto my computer back in ~2001.

I used the composite input on my Hauppauge WinTV and used VirtualDUB with a HUFFYUV plugin to apply lossless compression only so that the hard drives could keep up. I had striped two of the fastest 7200rpm units I could find to get enough write speed to get up, and the real time HUFFYUV compression really loaded my Athlon XP 1800+ :p

And that was just 480p! :p

Fun times.
 

chaos4u

Limp Gawd
Joined
Dec 1, 2004
Messages
349
I want to be excited about this, but the video absolutely showed me nothing to be excited about ....
 
Top