The Government Can Use GPS to Track Your Moves

Joined
Dec 13, 2003
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Can anyone show me on a map where the "land of the free and home of the brave is"? I've apparently misplaced the United States on my map.

The brave, absolutely. Home of the free? No so anymore. Wow, really bad time to be an American.
 

topcat989

Hamarabe Lover
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Jan 2, 2001
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you guys should see the paranoid responses to this over on the Daily Tech forum. You'd think this allowed the government to search your computer for pron and tell all your neighbors about it.

It's not that big of a deal. This just means that if your car is out in the open, they can track it. They could do that anyway by just tailing a person. This method just allows them to track someone with less chance of being caught and diverted, and to do it with fewer people. The only people that need to worry about any of this are the really, really bad people.
cut & paste of my response from the soapbox thread:

"...........For tails it takes much more time and resources to do, it takes humans (cops) involved in the tail itself. In other words, law enforcement has to ration those resources, that process would eliminate most frivolous uses and abuses of surveillance. Now with a quick lick'em and stick'em box that requires no warrant, no minimal amount of oversight for it's use, the potential for abuse has risen incredibly high. Another thing is that unless the surveillance team is large, roving, and experienced, people have a reasonable chance of spotting a tail if they are aware of their surroundings. To find the GPS box you'd have to conduct a "car bomb search" everytime before you drive off, a clearly time consuming ordeal that is not practical.

Believe me, I'm about as anti-criminal as anyone here. But this is a very frightening step that makes those "anti-government black helicopters new world order whackos" look rational and sane, and that scares me.

I'm not saying it should never be allowed, just that if law enforcement believes enough in their case to use it against someone, then they should have to make that case to a judge and get a warrant signed."


I'm sorry but if they are really really bad people they could get a search warrent without a problem. All this does is allow them to track honest citizens without issue.
my point exactly.

Fed law enforcement is not wasting their time putting tracking devices on just anybody. Contrary to popular belief, they still have to get approval from everybody AND their brother outside of the courts. So don't worry, your roaches are safe in your car ashtray.
except now it's so quick and easy, they'll start licking and sticking GPS boxes on anybody's car they suspect of being a criminal.
 

topcat989

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except now it's so quick and easy, they'll start licking and sticking GPS boxes on anybody's car they suspect of being a criminal.

because no edits here is revised:


..........except now it's so quick and easy, they'll start licking and sticking GPS boxes on anybody's car they suspect of being a criminal. Or a potential criminal. Or having an affair with their wife. Or a politician they'd like some dirt on. Or just for shits and giggles, or......get the picture?
 

Sly

Supreme [H]ardness
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Aug 17, 2004
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With GPS in every modern phone, I seriously doubt that the feds need to stick anything to your car - they can just ask your cellular company to track any and all your moves lol :D
Curiously, is there a way they can put it on media devices too?

Because i was riding a car while my ipod was tethered to my phone. And tried out google maps. It was tracking me pretty well. You don't need GPS.

I'm rather shocked at that. Have they mapped *EVERY* wifi in the city??? If this was a standard google API, then pretty much *any* wifi capable media device can track you.

On that note, would it be easier to bug an android then an iOS?
 

Sly

Supreme [H]ardness
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so would it be illegal to remove said gps device?
Forgot to include this in my post. If you find one attached to your car without your permission and remove it, would it be a federal offense for tampering with government property?
 

hahajung

Weaksauce
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Forgot to include this in my post. If you find one attached to your car without your permission and remove it, would it be a federal offense for tampering with government property?
I bet it is lol.
 

BobSutan

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With GPS in every modern phone, I seriously doubt that the feds need to stick anything to your car - they can just ask your cellular company to track any and all your moves lol :D
That would require, in theory at least, that they get a warrant. This way they just go to your house, slap a transponder on your car, and walk away. Guess there's nothing stopping Joe Schmoe from taking said transponder and affixing it to anyone else's car for that matter since what's good for the goose...
 

BobSutan

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Furthermore, I'd love to see a website called TrackYourGov.com or something similar where Joe Citizens place these tracking devices on high level gov officials like the Attorney General, judges, and so on. When they've got skin in the game and guarandamtee you they'll be singing a different tune about privacy concerns.
 

Crispy002

[H]ard|Gawd
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Forgot to include this in my post. If you find one attached to your car without your permission and remove it, would it be a federal offense for tampering with government property?
Plausible deniability. "I didn't know what it was but it had a cool magnet so I took it apart and used the magnet to hold up my kid's report card."
 

swoop56

Limp Gawd
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Sep 14, 2002
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Not sure what state you live in, but I consulted with a cop here in IL and he said that you can only use an approriate and justified level of violence to respond to a threat to yourself or your property. Meaning that someone simply stepping on your property wouldn't be enough to justify shooting someone. ...and that a court would take into consideration whether the response to the threat warranted shooting them. Oh...and that doesn't stop their family (or them if they're still alive) from suing you.
I read up on this, apparently on your property doesn't justify killing someone. They need to be in your house and pose a threat.
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2005
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806
you guys should see the paranoid responses to this over on the Daily Tech forum. You'd think this allowed the government to search your computer for pron and tell all your neighbors about it.
It's no different.

It's not that big of a deal.
So you did what Steve Jobs told you and held the phone differently? Yeah, it's not that big of a deal, right?

I have no idea what you consider "out in the open" to be, but if my car is on my property it is NOT "out in the open" for government officials to just stick something on. That's called TRESPASSING at the very least.

But there is a place for those who like tyrannical police states. Feel free to live there. It's called North Korea.
 

DeFex

[H]ard|DCer of the Month - June 2011
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So am I going to be arrested for riding everywhere on my bike with no phone?
 

Blown 89

2[H]4U
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I read up on this, apparently on your property doesn't justify killing someone. They need to be in your house and pose a threat.
It depends on the state. When I took my CCW the officer in charge of the class said in parts of Texas simply having a foot on your lawn and threatening you is good enough to pull the trigger without worry of recourse. Here in AZ you need them to cross the threshold. Posing a threat isn't a problem because, well, they've crossed the threshold without your consent, that's enough to warrant a threat in the court's eyes. All you have to do is tell the officer you felt threatened when he asks and you're covered. If it's on your lawn they need to be doing something to justify your actions. Every state is different.
 
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