Tesla Unveils Model Y Electric SUV with 300-Mile Range and Seven Seats

Zareek

Limp Gawd
Joined
Sep 5, 2011
Messages
191
If you can't see the difference between "unlocking a door" and "unlocking a door and extending the handles" so that somebody could actually use the door from the outside, I don't know what to tell you. I would argue that Tesla's are inherently less safe because of this "feature."
Point taken and understood, we can agree to disagree...
 

mope54

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Oct 2, 2004
Messages
7,437
If you can't see the difference between "unlocking a door" and "unlocking a door and extending the handles" so that somebody could actually use the door from the outside, I don't know what to tell you. I would argue that Tesla's are inherently less safe because of this "feature."
The handles don't pop out in the model that crashed. Pushing in on one side lifts/pushes the handle out on a pivot. It's not electric. The only thing that could have happened on Telsa's end are the electric locks failed to release, but more likely someone stood there staring at the handle waiting for it to do something it wasn't ever designed to do (pop out).

That's assuming someone even stood there trying anything, which I find doubtful at best.
 

Snowdog

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Apr 22, 2006
Messages
10,424
If you can't see the difference between "unlocking a door" and "unlocking a door and extending the handles" so that somebody could actually use the door from the outside, I don't know what to tell you. I would argue that Tesla's are inherently less safe because of this "feature."
If the door doesn't unlock it doesn't matter if the handles pop out or not.

Auto locking is a common feature, how robust is auto-unlock in a typical car in a 75+MPH crash?
 
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