Sunbeamtech NUUO 550W review posted!

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jonny,

Good Review! :D

As PSU efficiency has little to due with air in-take temp in real life,
how about hooking a hair dryer or something up to the hot box,
so we can get 40C air in-take on all PSU's. ;)
 

jonnyGURU

Technical Marketing Manager at Corsair Memory
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davidhammock200 said:
jonny,

Good Review! :D

As PSU efficiency has little to due with air in-take temp in real life,
how about hooking a hair dryer or something up to the hot box,
so we can get 40C air in-take on all PSU's. ;)

You do realize I'm pumping the heat generated by the load back into the case, right?
 
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jonnyGURU said:
You do realize I'm pumping the heat generated by the load back into the case, right?
Yes, however this means the more efficient PSU's never get the "air in-take" temp up to 40C.

I would love to see all PSU;s load tested at 40C.

Thanks,
Dave ;)
 

jonnyGURU

Technical Marketing Manager at Corsair Memory
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Well, I'm not really going to jump on doing that since it's not realistic. ;)

If a PSU is putting out 800W of power and the heat that generates isn't even making the inside of the case 40C, then why would a real PC ever get that hot? Keep in mind that the case has no intake or exhaust fans. It does have a lot of holes (slots are all knocked out, etc.), but no forced induction/exhaust. So the only intake air is the hot air pumped in from the load tester and all exhaust has to go through the power supply. Realistically, I don't think it gets any hotter than that.
 

madmat

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I agree. What you're doing is putting the same amount of shed heat into the case as the PSU is producing in power which is what a PSU would be faced with in a case. A PSU working in a case is producing its own heat and evacuating the heat produced by the electronics consuming that amount of power. The exceptions to this, of course, are water cooled PC's (with the rad mounted externally or as exhaust), phase cooled PC's and PC's that have electronics in them powered by an external source but they're largely the exception to the rule since most PC's are air cooled.
 
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jonnyGURU said:
Well, I'm not really going to jump on doing that since it's not realistic. ;)

If a PSU is putting out 800W of power and the heat that generates isn't even making the inside of the case 40C, then why would a real PC ever get that hot? Keep in mind that the case has no intake or exhaust fans. It does have a lot of holes (slots are all knocked out, etc.), but no forced induction/exhaust. So the only intake air is the hot air pumped in from the load tester and all exhaust has to go through the power supply. Realistically, I don't think it gets any hotter than that.
I understand that a higher efficiency PSU contribuites less heat,
however the CPU & GPU's generate a lot of heat &
it would be nice if all PSU's were tested with the same in-take temp.
 

jonnyGURU

Technical Marketing Manager at Corsair Memory
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davidhammock200 said:
I understand that a higher efficiency PSU contribuites less heat,
however the CPU & GPU's generate a lot of heat &
it would be nice if all PSU's were tested with the same in-take temp.

Dave, it's not the PSU's exhaust that's being pumped back into the case. It's the exhaust of the load getting pumped back in.

The load tester emulates the load of the CPU, GPU, etc. The TDP should be about the same coming off the load tester then it would be coming off of the components using the same amount of power. In other words, the heat coming off the CPU and GPU are in direct relation to the power it draws from the PSU. The same is true with the load tester. The "spent" power has to be dissipated as heat. This heat is pumped back into the case.

That said, the "intake" temps I measure is not the heat of the air pumped into the case. It's the temp of the air going into the PSU. So if a PSU fan is moving a lot of CFM's, then the intake temps will be lower than the ambient temp of the case since some heat is going to escape any way it can (obviously some heat escapes from the tube itself as it is hot to the touch when testing is done.) But that's part of the reason why I don't use any case fans. A normal build would have case fans evacuating most of this heat.
 
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jonnyGURU said:
Dave, it's not the PSU's exhaust that's being pumped back into the case. It's the exhaust of the load getting pumped back in.

The load tester emulates the load of the CPU, GPU, etc. The TDP should be about the same coming off the load tester then it would be coming off of the components using the same amount of power. In other words, the heat coming off the CPU and GPU are in direct relation to the power it draws from the PSU. The same is true with the load tester. The "spent" power has to be dissipated as heat. This heat is pumped back into the case.

That said, the "intake" temps I measure is not the heat of the air pumped into the case. It's the temp of the air going into the PSU. So if a PSU fan is moving a lot of CFM's, then the intake temps will be lower than the ambient temp of the case since some heat is going to escape any way it can (obviously some heat escapes from the tube itself as it is hot to the touch when testing is done.) But that's part of the reason why I don't use any case fans. A normal build would have case fans evacuating most of this heat.
Thank you for the explination. :eek:
 
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