Study uncovers new electronic state of matter

erek

[H]ardness Supreme
Joined
Dec 19, 2005
Messages
4,408
Pretty exciting stuff! This is awesome!

"Effects of correlations between electrons are enhanced in systems of reduced dimensions. The two-dimensional interface between two oxide materials, lanthanum aluminate (LaAlO3) and strontium titanate (SrTiO3), exhibits magnetism and superconductivity. In even lower-dimensional systems fabricated in similar heterostructures, electrons can pair without going superconducting. Briggeman et al. have now observed another exotic effect in LaAlO3/SrTiO3 waveguides: At certain magnetic fields, the conductance in these one-dimensional systems exhibits steps of an unconventional sequence. To understand the experimental data, the researchers used a model that accounted for interactions between electrons and found that the phenomenology was consistent with the formation of a series of correlated phases characterized by bound states of three or more electrons.


One-dimensional electronic systems can support exotic collective phases because of the enhanced role of electron correlations. We describe the experimental observation of a series of quantized conductance steps within strongly interacting electron waveguides formed at the lanthanum aluminate–strontium titanate (LaAlO3/SrTiO3) interface. The waveguide conductance follows a characteristic sequence within Pascal’s triangle: (1, 3, 6, 10, 15, …) ⋅ e2/h, where e is the electron charge and h is the Planck constant. This behavior is consistent with the existence of a family of degenerate quantum liquids formed from bound states of n = 2, 3, 4, … electrons. Our experimental setup could provide a setting for solid-state analogs of a wide range of composite fermionic phases."


 

KD5ZXG

Limp Gawd
Joined
Mar 24, 2017
Messages
486
I find it weird that ballistic electrons would choose to team up in threes.
Don't they usually try for the path of least resistance, which would be
to fake like a boson that can pass through other like bosons and flow
as a supercurrent. Which should require teamups with integer spin?

How is 3x.5=1.5 supposed to do that? You don't get supercurrents in
a 1x.5 vacuum tube. Might be ballistic, but nothing in a vacuum keeps
electrons bunched as pairs, trios, or clown car Pascadoodles. Except
when a gap is narrow, pairs might tunnel, not case I'm trying to make.
Only time this normally works is Cooper pairs of 2x.5=1 in cold metals...

I don't know what I'm getting at. Just pisses me off I can't understand.
 
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ThatITGuy

Limp Gawd
Joined
May 5, 2017
Messages
348
I find it weird that ballistic electrons would choose to team up in threes.
Don't they usually try for the path of least resistance, which would be
to fake like a boson that can pass through other like bosons and flow
as a supercurrent. Which should require teamups with integer spin?

How is 3x.5=1.5 supposed to do that? You don't get supercurrents in
a 1x.5 vacuum tube. Might be ballistic, but nothing in a vacuum keeps
electrons bunched as pairs, trios, or clown car Pascadoodles. Except
when a gap is narrow, pairs might tunnel, not case I'm trying to make.
Only time this normally works is Cooper pairs of 2x.5=1 in cold metals...

I don't know what I'm getting at. Just pisses me off I can't understand.
I get it. I am feeling the same way trying to understand your formatting.
 

KD5ZXG

Limp Gawd
Joined
Mar 24, 2017
Messages
486
A trio might be more like two rightsideupsiums and an upsidaisium. Sum(+.5,+.5,-.5) = +.5 not an integer.
Or two upsidasiums and whatever the opposite spin was again, yeah. Sum(-.5,-.5,+.5) = -.5 still no integer.
Non-integer spin totals should experience resistance as one might expect of individual electrons, fermions.
What moron decided an electron only counts as half a spin?

Whatever's going on, is not a boson unless perhaps Cooper pairs of oppositely spun trios travel together.

Though occurs to me lately to imagine the orbitals of Nitrogen. In the deepest layer of this circuit, a pair
of electrons with opposite spins locally superconduct, like some quantum perpetual motion machine.
In the next layer, we got two pairs and an oddball. The pairs are faking it hard to act like bosons, so
they won't have to obey Pauli's exclusion principle to get out of each other's way. Why? Maybe cause
local superconductivity is the path of least resistance?

The leftover electron also seems happy to orbit without resistance or collision in the same energy band
as other two pairs. Just as it would if alone. Pobably collide or be forced to pair if another lone electron
got trapped nearby. But bosonic pairs seem able to pass through each other and the leftover fermion as
waves rather than firm particles. They still repel each other and attract to the nucleus, but don't collide.

In Oxygen, three pairs occupy this band. Or is it sometimes also a pair of trios? Could we even tell?
 
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floridateddybear

Limp Gawd
Joined
Feb 21, 2016
Messages
181
When I entered this thread, I didnt know there was gonna be math involved.. or science/physics that I forgot/left behind 36 yrs ago

now I leave, my brain having suffered terribly
 

sfsuphysics

I don't get it
Joined
Jan 14, 2007
Messages
13,890
The fact there's a 34+ minute long video trying to explain this tells me I don't want to know about it right now. Where's the article? (probably behind a paywall) where's the really dumbed down version of what's happening in Wired or something. Then find a happy medium in between.
 
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