Sticking With Windows 7? The Forecast Calls For Pain

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We all know what a pain in the ass it is to do a fresh install of Windows 7 these days but, the truth is, most of us are so used to doing it, that it's not even an issue anymore. ;)

Which means that if you try to do a clean install using the most recent installation media, as I did on Monday, this is what you see when you run Windows Update. Yes, 216 Important updates are available even with Service Pack 1 installed, and you'd have to be crazy to connect to the Internet without installing those patches first.
 

Nenu

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This is more an advert about why you should avoid Microsoft altogether.
They will inflict the same pain on Windows 10.

I saved myself the trouble by having a backup of a fresh install of Windows 7 with all updates to that point and my basic apps/security installed.
 

MavericK

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On many machines we've had in for a fresh install, it can take upwards of 2-4 hours just to SEE that there are 216 updates. Then, it takes another couple hours at LEAST to actually install them (assuming several don't fail and you have to do the whole process again a few times).

They just need to release a fucking SP2 and allow it to be slipstreamed so we don't have to deal with the BS.
 

Osirus

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They just need to release a fucking SP2 and allow it to be slipstreamed so we don't have to deal with the BS.

There isnt going to be an SP2. Win 7 hit end of mainstream support a year ago.

This is to be expected with a 7 year old OS. Thankfully Windows 10 was offered as a free upgrade, and has constant updated images available for installation due to a more agile development model unlike the dinosaur Windows 7.
 

Joshuad156

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I recently installed Win7 SP1 from media on 2 new builds in my house. The process was a complete nightmare. The 2 identical PCs reacted very differently to the process, which amazes me. It took probably 3-4 days before I installed the final update. Both machines broke multiple times (click check for updates and receive an error) that required me to completely reset Windows updates before it would continue.
 

Revdarian

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I never experienced pain during a clean install of win7. It actually takes less than 30 minutes from flash drive.


What are you doing being reasonable and not trying to help shill for Microsoft? shoo shoo!, go back to your cave!!111

:LOL:
 

cyclone3d

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On many machines we've had in for a fresh install, it can take upwards of 2-4 hours just to SEE that there are 216 updates. Then, it takes another couple hours at LEAST to actually install them (assuming several don't fail and you have to do the whole process again a few times).

They just need to release a fucking SP2 and allow it to be slipstreamed so we don't have to deal with the BS.

Sooo... get a machine and install Windows 7 and all the current updates.

Then do a drive cleanup (with cleanup system files) so it will clear out any unneeded files - you will also want to at least clear out C:\Windows\Temp and also do a clean out of the Windows update cache to save more space on the image so it makes it faster to capture and to deploy.

Then, do a sysprep, selecting the generalize and shutdown options so it removes drivers and make Windows redetect the hardware after being imaged.

Then, use a boot CD and gimagex (GUI for imagex) with imagex, and make an image onto an external USB drive.

Then, when you need to redo a machine it will take a whopping ~15 minutes to image and then a few more to do the initial Windows hardware detection.

Unless it is a Dell or other OEM machine, you will end up having to either install without a key and then enter a key when it boots up, or change the key when it boots up.

Easy peasy and the time it takes to make an image will pay itself off after 2 machines are imaged.
 

Jim Kim

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I recently installed Win7 SP1 from media on 2 new builds in my house. The process was a complete nightmare. The 2 identical PCs reacted very differently to the process, which amazes me. It took probably 3-4 days before I installed the final update. Both machines broke multiple times (click check for updates and receive an error) that required me to completely reset Windows updates before it would continue.

Luckily I have never experienced those issues, now Vista on the other hand was a Nightmare to reinstall.
 

ir0nw0lf

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On many machines we've had in for a fresh install, it can take upwards of 2-4 hours just to SEE that there are 216 updates. Then, it takes another couple hours at LEAST to actually install them (assuming several don't fail and you have to do the whole process again a few times).

They just need to release a fucking SP2 and allow it to be slipstreamed so we don't have to deal with the BS.
Your best friend(s):
Windows6.1-KB3102810-x64.msu
Windows6.1-KB3102810-x86.msu

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/3102810

Those have reduced the initial scan time for updates down to as little as 5-15 minutes. There is a thread around the forums here with more info. I just did a fresh Win 7 SP1 install this morning, installed the x64 file mentioned and it took <5 min to finish the initial check for updates. YMMV as I have heard it doesn't fix the issue for everyone.
 

yourgrandma

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You're far more likely to run into problems upgrading to 10 then reloading windows 7 and doing updates.
 

defaultluser

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and you'd have to be crazy to connect to the Internet without installing those patches first.

Dudes making a mountain out of a molehill.

If you're behind a firewall router, worms can't find your computer. So just install whatever Ethernet driver you need, and just let it go to town installing the updates. As long as you install nothing and don't launch IE, it should only communicate with Microsoft's servers.

Yeah, you have to wait until the updates are installed before you go to a website, but that's normal.
 

DukenukemX

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I solved the problem by running Linux. Now I have a new problem, which is trying to run Fallout 4.

4830203.jpg
 

Colonel Sanders

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The update process from first pass, installing the updated Update service, to full finished installing all updates and "Windows is currently up to date" takes around 4 hours I'd say. It takes an hour just to scan for necessary updates the first time.

I'll look into creating an image thanks to cyclone3d's post above.
 

m2h

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Still mean to switch to 10. Clean install is no biggie since o keep my Steam folder on a separate drive. Nothing much else gets on the only Windows system at home.
 

Eiolon

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I did a clean install of Windows 7 last month. Because we were upgrading almost every piece of software on the systems I thought it would be nice to start fresh. Just having it query for the Windows updates took almost 6 hours. It used to take maybe 5 minutes. Finally it brought up the list of a couple hundred then I left it overnight to install.
 

ep0x73

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I like 10 and had it installed from the insider to full pro 64 for 8+ months. The only issue is MS still will not let pro users pick and choose which updates they want.
If they would I probably would upgrade my other 7 machines.
 

MavericK

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crono15

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There isnt going to be an SP2. Win 7 hit end of mainstream support a year ago.

This is to be expected with a 7 year old OS. Thankfully Windows 10 was offered as a free upgrade, and has constant updated images available for installation due to a more agile development model unlike the dinosaur Windows 7.

Tell me about that, that is one main issue that frustrated me when building and deploying Win 7 images to multiple systems.
 

DPI

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There isnt going to be an SP2. Win 7 hit end of mainstream support a year ago.

This is to be expected with a 7 year old OS. Thankfully Windows 10 was offered as a free upgrade, and has constant updated images available for installation due to a more agile development model unlike the dinosaur Windows 7.
"Agile development model" lmfao

You mean permanent beta, and everyone's a beta tester while MS tries to figure out what makes a good OS, something they used to know and understand before this metro and mobile app on desktop era of suck.
 

Snowdog

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Sticking with Win7 doesn't imply doing more clean installs. I installed Windows 7 once, MANY years ago. I plan to keep using the same install until this computer dies.
 

crusty_juggler

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Clean installs are for n00bs. A true nerd deploys a fully patched .wim

Windows 10 murdered my family at the behest of the NSA.
 

the_real_7

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easy peazy always have a completed fresh install with updates on a image backup with my ssd 8 min and im up
 

Draxanoth

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This is why network imaging was created. I don't have to care that it takes 20 minutes to install, because I only have to spent 30 seconds pushing the go button. It would probably take me far less time to create a slip-streamed image for 7 than chase down the annoying crap in 10 every time they decide to move where you disable it...

The Windows 10 blowhards are really pushing it to the limit right now. Did adoption levels crash or what?
 
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I just reinstalled Win 7 on my system. It took only a couple of hours from start to finish. I had all my drivers ready to go on a flash drive but it still did not seem as long as the article makes it out to be. In fact I was telling someone how this is so much easier than the first time I installed Windows 95.
 

Quix

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You mean permanent beta, and everyone's a beta tester while MS tries to figure out what makes a good OS, something they used to know and understand before this metro and mobile app on desktop era of suck.

Yes, that's what "Agile development model" means. And get used to it because everything is going that way... until the next fad.
 

daglesj

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Doing those updates with just 4GB of ram? Then make sure you split them up into chunks or put more ram in. It runs out of ram about update 180.
 

The Cobra

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Luckily I have never experienced those issues, now Vista on the other hand was a Nightmare to reinstall.

I just reinstalled Vista x64 onto my old QX9560 a few weeks ago. I had a DVD with SP2 slipstreamed into it, then ran Windows Update, two hours later I was finished. I just ran off and did other stuff.
 

CacaSapo

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As others have mentioned, either slipstream or sysprep it.
I slipstreamed updates into an ISO and it came to about 5GB, so, fits in a DVD-DL. Had to use a VMware machine with 7 on it, but that's no big deal.
 

DPI

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Yes, that's what "Agile development model" means. And get used to it because everything is going that way... until the next fad.

I'm very well aware of Agile dev, but that does not compel in me a sense of obligation as a consumer user of Windows. When the agile dev is being (mis)managed by a company with no vision, I can't be bothered to opt in to unstable software where features are removed at a moment's notice. Sorry, sparky.
 

heatlesssun

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I'm very well aware of Agile dev, but that does not compel in me a sense of obligation as a consumer user of Windows. When the agile dev is being (mis)managed by a company with no vision, I can't be bothered to opt in to unstable software where features are removed at a moment's notice. Sorry, sparky.

What does mismanaged Agile Development mean? The bottom line is that no matter what you or I think, Windows simply has to move faster because of the market. What faster means is a fair question but three year development cycles in the consumer world just can't be anymore. Every year Apple and Google tick out a new version with a bigger number. The monopoly that you've so many times blasted really would have liked your way.
 
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Zepher

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You're far more likely to run into problems upgrading to 10 then reloading windows 7 and doing updates.

I had an issue with Windows Update not working at all on one of my original 2009 installs (it's actually the source of the cloned drive in my Garage PC in my sig).
Something happened to Windows and Windows Update would always fail, even using one of the KB updates that does it stand -alone would fail, so I upgraded that install to Windows 10.
I don't care for Windows 10, but it is working fine in the Gateway laptop I stuck the drive into.
 

Benzino

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I use WSUS Offline Update to run at least the majority of updates locally without ever connecting a fresh Windows 7 install to the network. That way when I actually connect to the Internet it doesn't have as many updates to grab.
 
D

Deleted member 245375

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I make a new ISO monthly using an update pack, takes a few minutes, has no issues, and the person that creates the update pack stays on top of those pesky updates that could potentially introduce anything related to Windows 10 including the stuff that adds the telemetry crap to Windows 7 retroactively as well. Been using that update pack for a few years now and it's never let me down, allows me to install Windows 7 right now if I want and when the installation is done if I hit Windows Update the only thing it'll pull are driver updates and Windows Defender (because after a clean install I don't have MSE installed at that point but that gets added soon enough).

Current ISO for Windows 7 Professional x64 (the only edition I use) is 4.40GB so, it won't burn on a DVD5 and I don't use optical media much anymore anyway, I have an 8GB USB stick that I use exclusively for that ISO's target location.

But yeah, 216+ updates after an SP1 installation (using SP1 media) leads to 5 reboots and nearly 2.3GB of downloads even in spite of the estimated file sizes the Windows Update client tells you it'll have to grab. It ain't pretty but, that's how it goes.

I'm actually using OSX currently since I really can't tolerate Linux at all - I have a Windows 7 virtual machine that I just created not 24 hours ago using that newest ISO I just made yesterday as well (newest update pack was released on March 15th. If you're interested - and yes the site is in Russian so use Google Translate if needed, the actual instructions to integrate are simple: extract the install.wim file from a piece of SP1 media, put that in a folder with the update pack executable, open a Command Prompt, execute two lines of code (one to figure out which edition index you want to use or you can just do the entire disc and the second starts the actual update process, then you copy the install.wim back into the ISO after deleting the old one with a tool like Ultra ISO which is my tool of choice or PowerISO, whatever).

Anyway, more info in the OP of this thread:

Наборы - UpdatePack7R2 версия 16.3.15

I'm pissed at Microsoft for a lot of things - especially anything and everything related to Windows 10, period - but my biggest grip overall, even in spite of some of their underhanded bullshit happeing to Windows 7, is the fact that they never gave us a proper Service Pack 2 for Windows 7 and of course now that's the proverbial snowball's chance in hell kind of thing. It would have been nice to have one but doing this update pack monthly is easier I suppose and once you create one, you can use that install.wim for the next month, you don't have to do the entire process again to do the 216+ updates, the update pack creation is cumulative in that respect.

The original update pack I used was from 2 years ago and I've just used the monthly releases to create the new ISO which takes a few minutes at most - the first time you create one from SP1 media it will take upwards of 30-45 minutes depending on your machine's power/speed/storage, but after that the regular smaller patching happens much much faster.
 
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