Something totally else: a 150CFM fan at 0.3 sones

Discussion in 'Overclocking & Cooling' started by chx, May 22, 2019.

  1. chx

    chx Gawd

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  2. VanGoghComplex

    VanGoghComplex [H]ard|Gawd

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    It's likely a squirrel cage blower fan and it's much larger than 6" - that's just the size of the duct coming off it. There's no filter and integrating one would add noise and reduce flow. It's almost certainly 120vac powered and not controllable other than the integrated speed switch, so you'd need a relay of some sort to get it to come on with the computer. If you wanted to be tricky you might be able to give get your computer to control the two speeds but you'd need some type of discrete I/O interface to engage another relay for that.

    It'd be a fun project but there's a fair amount of electrical work involved, not even considering how you'd need to mod a case if you actually wanted to integrate it. It would easily double the size of a standard ATX mid tower.
     
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  3. pendragon1

    pendragon1 [H]ardForum Junkie

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    its a crapper fan. so yes 120v and probably 10"+ blades or squirrel cage.
    oh and cause its A/C it probably will cause electrical noise/interference in the pc.
     
  4. honegod

    honegod [H]ardness Supreme

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    " a double-tapered blower wheel to quietly move air at twice the static pressure as the industry standard"

    Wow. That could be up to twice as much as a single taper wheel !!

    And still move air at twice normal static pressure.

    But nobody wants a 2" of mercury bathroom vent.
    (depending on which way the door opens :)

    With solid state drives, everything in a computer is pretty shock resistant.
    So sew an itx hat to the head of a car lot waving tube person.
     
  5. VanGoghComplex

    VanGoghComplex [H]ard|Gawd

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    I think modern fart fans use DC motors. At least some of them do, if not this particular model. If it's a 12v motor, you could probably bypass the rectifier and run it straight off your PSU.
     
  6. pendragon1

    pendragon1 [H]ardForum Junkie

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    12v DC in home wiring? maybe it steps down/transforms but I haven't ever seen a house wired with 12v DC.
     
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  7. ryan_975

    ryan_975 [H]ardForum Junkie

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    Definitely not a 12v motor

    upload_2019-5-24_8-13-17.png
     
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  8. VanGoghComplex

    VanGoghComplex [H]ard|Gawd

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    I may be misremembering, but I recently replaced an exhaust fan in my house and I think I remember "DC motor" being advertised on the packaging. I deffo wired 120vac to it, but a stepdown transformer and rectifier are pretty cheap.

    Yep, checked the product page: this one at least has a DC motor.

    https://www.menards.com/main/bath/b...10-c-5869.htm?tid=5788564014952031128&ipos=18
     
  9. pendragon1

    pendragon1 [H]ardForum Junkie

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    yes the motor itself is DC but there must be a transformer in it as the input voltage is 110v AC. you wouldnt be able to take the dc motor and hook into a pc's 12v dc.
     
  10. KATEKATEKATE

    KATEKATEKATE [H]Lite

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    what a wild world we live in where even toilet fans use the "transformer + rectifier + inverter + brushless DC motor" arrangement instead of the classic and endlessly-reliable "multi-tap shaded pole induction motor right across the mains" setup.

    I imagine this brushless DC motor fad will continue until absolutely everything has a microcontroller in it and we've all forgotten that there is perfectly good AC coming out of the wall socket that will happily run "brushless" synchronous/asynchronous motors just as Nikola Tesla and George Westinghouse intended, no integrated circuits required.

    I promise i'm not as old or curmudgeonly as this rant suggests


    As for the fan that this thread was originally about... there's nothing magic about it; large fans can just be quieter than smaller ones because the air doesn't have to be moved as fast to get meaningful flow volume. A cheap cheap plug-in fan from Walmart would get much the same effect as long as the blade diameter is sufficiently large. For EXTREME cooling, one could replace the side panel of their PC with a whole box fan, just remember to remove the protective grille to keep the noise-causing turbulence down and watch those fingers and toes! ;)
     
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