So why Are GPU-AIO coolers smaller than CPU-AIO coolers

Discussion in 'Overclocking & Cooling' started by AP514, Jan 10, 2019.

  1. AP514

    AP514 Limp Gawd

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    I have seen a lot of GPU coolers that are only 1 fan compared to CPU coolers that are at least 2 fans..

    WHY is that ??
     
  2. Supercharged_Z06

    Supercharged_Z06 2[H]4U

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    This is [H]. We don't buy GPU/CPU coolers that come with fans. We buy blocks and add them to [H] custom loops. :p
     
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  3. AP514

    AP514 Limp Gawd

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    ya already looking at putting a NF on the AIO's
     
  4. El Derpo

    El Derpo Limp Gawd

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    My current card is a 1080 Sea Hawk and when it’s OC’d and at max load, it rarely goes above 60 C. So one fan seems to work just fine. Having said that, I would definitely prefer a bigger radiator. My next GPU will use a water block.

    I switched out the stock fan for a Noctua. Works well. Also did it because I wasn’t crazy about the blinding white light on the stock fan.
     
  5. VanGoghComplex

    VanGoghComplex [H]ard|Gawd

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    I'd guess that they're sized that way for compatibility. It's much easier to place a single rad in most cases than a dual rad.

    And, as others have said, a single rad is sufficient for "better than air" cooling. It surely isn't as effective as full custom loop cooling, but it's enough to sell the card as a premium product.
     
  6. Dermen

    Dermen Limp Gawd

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    GPUs don't need that much cooling. With overclocking you are usually limited by temps on a stock card. A 120mm AIO will drop the temps enough that you will be able to max out the OC without worrying about temps at all. A thicker 120mm AIO or a 240mm AIO will give you lower temps, but won't give you a better overclock.
     
  7. Araxie

    Araxie [H]ardness Supreme

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    The reason its because of direct die cooling.. the AIO waterblock make direct contact with the gpu die while in CPUs doesnt . The cpu have the IHS or lid which cause a lost in heat dissipation and transfer from the cpu die to the waterblock.
     
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  8. AP514

    AP514 Limp Gawd

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    Now that is a Very Good Answer.. Several good ones here....
    So, when I finish my new build tomorrow and If the Minned card I bought- MSI Armor 1080 test out good and my temps are running High while gaming . I will most assuredly go for the G12 and a H55 Combo.
     
  9. doyll

    doyll Kyle's Thermocouple is HOT

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    While GPU dies is naked and CPU dies do have IHS, the IHS does not change how much heat the CPU die generates.

    Besides the TDP rating of GPU dies is easily as high and generally higher than that of CPU dies. Based on TDP ratings GPUs should need more radiator area than CPUs .. and most custom loops allow a 240 rad for each GPU used as well as one for CPU.

    But CLCs peeps buy to cool GPUs are same garbage as CLCs used on CPUs, and the market is geared toward uninformed consumer market, not consumers who know what is going on. Also a good aftermarket air cooler with good case airflow is easily as good as most CLCs are, while stock GPU coolers are not as good as aftermarket CPU coolers and most peeps looking to upgrade GPU cooler don't only have a few good aftermarket air cooling options, so no competition like with CPU air cooling. I think those are more the reasons GPU CLCs are smaller than CPU CLCs. ;)
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2019