Samsung makes Controller changes the right way

Zarathustra[H]

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https://www.tomshardware.com/uk/news/samsung-is-swapping-ssd-parts-too

This is how its done Adata, WD, Crucial, Kingston, Patriot and any of you other companies thinking about sneaking in unadvertised controller or NAND changes to previously reviewed drives.

Samsung was listening.

I'll agree that this is a little better than the others to date, but still, would have been better that they used a completely different model name, to make it very very clear.

I'm about the order a large number of Inland premiums, and I am concerned they might be doing the same thing transparently.

Thus far they are very clear on their packaging that they are TLC. I hope that doesn't change.
 

hititnquitit

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My assumption is they are probably not changing the name because they anticipate either changing back to the original components or anticipate running into even more shortages. As in this is a short term solution to a long term component shortage. So this may be happening again very soon.

I hope this doesn't become the norm but we now have two giants that have changed components. Who would have guessed that Crucial and Samsung would have to change anything ever, being that they manufacture everything themselves(at least that's how i understand it)?
 

GotNoRice

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Although I would have preferred if they had made changes to the basic Model name (even just adding v2 to the end or whatever), at least Samsung makes things clear when it comes to part numbers. What Samsung is doing reminds me more of what Intel has done in the past. For example, when the Q6600 came out, you had the B3 stepping and G0 stepping. Most B3 could only OC to 3.3Ghz but most G0 would reliably hit 3.6. They were both just called "Q6600" though, you actually had to do more research to figure out if you were going to get a B3 or G0. Sucks, but at least they are making the difference known for people who care to look at the details, unlike what WD did which was more of a stealthy bait-and-switch.
 

hititnquitit

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I'm about the order a large number of Inland premiums, and I am concerned they might be doing the same thing transparently.

Thus far they are very clear on their packaging that they are TLC. I hope that doesn't change.
The only way to know is if you have an older drive you can make comparisons to (if you don't mind pulling stickers) or the new drives don't test the way they are advertised as or have been reviewed as. Then of course you might see an article somewhere stating that inland has been the latest company caught making changes... hopefully none of that is true.
 

DanNeely

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Although I would have preferred if they had made changes to the basic Model name (even just adding v2 to the end or whatever), at least Samsung makes things clear when it comes to part numbers. What Samsung is doing reminds me more of what Intel has done in the past. For example, when the Q6600 came out, you had the B3 stepping and G0 stepping. Most B3 could only OC to 3.3Ghz but most G0 would reliably hit 3.6. They were both just called "Q6600" though, you actually had to do more research to figure out if you were going to get a B3 or G0. Sucks, but at least they are making the difference known for people who care to look at the details, unlike what WD did which was more of a stealthy bait-and-switch.
Not just Intel.

The Athlon 1400 in my first selfbuilt system had an AXIA stepping CPU because at the time that batch had the reputation for the best overclocks.
 

MavericK

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If you read the article, this new drive is actually faster in some ways, and has more cache, so it's not a straight downgrade.
Regardless, if you change the hardware, change the name. It doesn't seem that hard to me.
 

hititnquitit

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The part of the article to keep in mind regarding name changes is...

"A DigiTimes report confirmed that Samsung has been facing a SSD controller shortage due to the fact that its Texa factories, which produce SSD controllers, have been idle since February."

Most likely once they're able to get those plants operational, they will switch back to the phoenix controller rather than continue to scavenge the 980pro controller (elpis). The elpis controller probably costs more being that its coming from their premium drive and having to use it in the evo plus has to hurt financially.
So changing a single part number on the box was likely an easier, cheaper option vs adding to the 970 evo plus name on everything.
That's my theory at least. Who knows they may keep the drive as is.
 

DukenukemX

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https://www.tomshardware.com/uk/news/samsung-is-swapping-ssd-parts-too

This is how its done Adata, WD, Crucial, Kingston, Patriot and any of you other companies thinking about sneaking in unadvertised controller or NAND changes to previously reviewed drives.

Samsung was listening.
If these companies were changing their parts in their SSD's that's because they consider their customers idiots. They can hide behind shit like their stickers that say "opening will void warranty", which hasn't been true for years now but doesn't stop them from putting the sticker on to confuse people. At this point I think it's only fair I return a 256GB SSD for a 1TB I bought. By Adata, WD, Crucial, Kingston, and Patriot's own actions, this would seem fine. Two can play at this game.
 

thecold

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EVO SE (Slower Edition) ;-)

FE115/SE116 (because until it runs out of cache, it's actually faster)

On an actual note, I don't see it being a problem for most things. Yea, it's annoying, but its not a deal breaker. (besides I'm using sk hynix nvme drives... and some older nvme 3 drives)
 
D

Deleted member 89018

Guest
Hmm. The massive drop in speed when the cache fills up doesn’t bother you guys?

i get that it’s a trade off, but this seems like an opportunity to call it a 980 se or something, rather than alter the previous generation parts.
 

cybereality

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I feel like they did the right thing. New model number, new packaging, informed the community beforehand.

Yes, they could have changed the name completely, maybe this would have been best, but it's also not worse across the board (in some cases it is better) so it doesn't feel like a trick.
 

OutOfPhase

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Is this where I say we should demand specs which are "at least" versus "up to"?
 

Red Falcon

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Absolute failure. They should call it the 970 Evo minus or something. As far as I'm concerned it shouldn't carry the Evo or 970 either. Next to no one will notice this tiny change in model number.
That sounds too negative. Are you positive that would be a good idea?

Samsung 970 EVO Plus Minus = Samsung 970 EVO Neutral?

Introducing the Samsung Polarity Edition...
Did either of you actually read the article?
Samsung's In-House controller is a lot better than the Phoenix controller originally used, so if anything it is making the product better and has equal or better specs now.

The only 'fail' is that Samsung is using a more expensive controller on a lesser part due to supply constraints, thus it is costing Samsung more money and not the buyer.
 

arnemetis

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Did either of you actually read the article?
Samsung's In-House controller is a lot better than the Phoenix controller originally used, so if anything it is making the product better and has equal or better specs now.

The only 'fail' is that Samsung is using a more expensive controller on a lesser part due to supply constraints, thus it is costing Samsung more money and not the buyer.
When they make changes it should be a whole new product name. Not sold it's a full featured version of the controller, maybe it's inferior ones. Regardless now they need to be tested again. All they had to do was make a new product name. Or simply be out of stock of that product until supply returns.
 

OutOfPhase

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Did either of you actually read the article?
Samsung's In-House controller is a lot better than the Phoenix controller originally used
Phoenix is the original in-house Samsung controller, versus the Elpis controller now used.
 

Red Falcon

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When they make changes it should be a whole new product name. Not sold it's a full featured version of the controller, maybe it's inferior ones. Regardless now they need to be tested again. All they had to do was make a new product name. Or simply be out of stock of that product until supply returns.
Companies have been doing this for years - not saying it is right or anything, but revisions to products are constantly being made.
The PS3 had numerous revisions with different model numbers, and it was still called a PS3.

GPUs are given numerous hardware revisions, and they retain the same name.
Your outrage, while correct, is around 40 years too late.
 

Ebernanut

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Absolute failure. They should call it the 970 Evo minus or something. As far as I'm concerned it shouldn't carry the Evo or 970 either. Next to no one will notice this tiny change in model number.
The change in part numbers means that online retailers will likely list it as a separate product making it easy for anyone who cares to differentiate between the two, not that anyone should care unless they mostly use it for several hundred GB transfers.
 

TordanGow

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Although I would have preferred if they had made changes to the basic Model name (even just adding v2 to the end or whatever), at least Samsung makes things clear when it comes to part numbers. What Samsung is doing reminds me more of what Intel has done in the past. For example, when the Q6600 came out, you had the B3 stepping and G0 stepping. Most B3 could only OC to 3.3Ghz but most G0 would reliably hit 3.6. They were both just called "Q6600" though, you actually had to do more research to figure out if you were going to get a B3 or G0. Sucks, but at least they are making the difference known for people who care to look at the details, unlike what WD did which was more of a stealthy bait-and-switch.
Similar, the big difference to me is the Intel parts always seemed to get better - likely due to manufacturing process maturity, the products did not go backwards. G0 stepping was better than B3, but it came out after B3. Hard to complain about products getting better as time goes on.

Unrelated but on the topic of core 2 chips... we still have a q8400 desktop at home. Kids use it for homework and the like.
 

ElementDave

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Did either of you actually read the article?
Earlier posters spoiled the ending!
Samsung's In-House controller is a lot better than the Phoenix controller originally used, so if anything it is making the product better and has equal or better specs now.

The only 'fail' is that Samsung is using a more expensive controller on a lesser part due to supply constraints, thus it is costing Samsung more money and not the buyer.
Better/worse/equal. As long as Samsung publishes their drive specifications so that I know what I'm buying, and evidently they do, I don't have a problem with the changes. I don't find Samsung's actions in any way comparable to the stunts pulled by the other companies recently reported.

https://www.samsung.com/semiconductor/minisite/ssd/download/documents/
https://www.samsung.com/us/computin...sd-970-evo-plus-nvme-m-2-500gb-mz-v7s500b-am/
 
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