Samsung CFG70 gaming monitor seems to be slowly failing?

Joined
Mar 29, 2012
Messages
776
I'm having a really bizarre problem with my monitor that I only just now realized was a monitor issue. It's a monitor I bought in 2017 or so.

https://www.samsung.com/us/computing/monitors/curved/lc24fg70fqnxza-lc24fg70fqnxza/

Basically, the monitor worked flawlessly for three years and I loved using it, but then I started getting a weird issue last year where I would see all these weird glitchy vertical lines and patterns whenever I turned on my computer and I had to wait for the system to warm up before they would disappear. It wasn't too bad at first, but now the thing is almost unusable for 20 minutes if I have to warm it up from a cold boot. I assumed at first my graphics card was failing, but now I've plugged different devices into it and realized the monitor itself is what is having the issue where even the onscreen OSD is glitchy until everything is warmed up, regardless of what device is plugged in. The graphics card had nothing to do with it apparently, but the way the monitor is acting looks a LOT like how a graphics card starts to misbehave when it starts to fail, if you know what I mean.

The weird thing is, the monitor works fine after about 20 minutes and the problems don't come back until it is turned off again, so as long as it's turned on and warmed up for long enough, whatever is wrong with it seems to resolve itself and allows me to use it as normal, but it's taking longer and longer to be usable from being powered on initially.

I've never had this happen to a monitor before, so what I'm wondering is if maybe it has something to do with it being a high-refresh gaming monitor. Does the high refresh rate and the way they drive the panels wear out the display a lot sooner? Or did I just get unlucky with a power surge and/or a shoddy capacitor in the monitor somewhere?

I got this monitor because it had this strobing backlight effect that could kinda emulate the experience of using a CRT and eliminate a certain kind of input lag that has always bothered me, and I figured I should get one of those before my actual CRT fails. But it looks like at the rate it's going, it's going to die sooner than the CRT it was intended to be a backup for.
 

Starfalcon

Gawd
Joined
Jan 7, 2020
Messages
640
That is a known issue with this monitor, had the same thing happen to mine. It was fine for about a year, then started with the corruption and slowly got worse over the next several years. Eventually the whole screen was corruted and it usually took 20-30 mins for it to go back to normal. I ended up replacing it at that point with a new one, as I figured soon it wouldnt fix itself and stay corruped.
 
Joined
Mar 29, 2012
Messages
776
That is a known issue with this monitor, had the same thing happen to mine. It was fine for about a year, then started with the corruption and slowly got worse over the next several years. Eventually the whole screen was corruted and it usually took 20-30 mins for it to go back to normal. I ended up replacing it at that point with a new one, as I figured soon it wouldnt fix itself and stay corruped.

That makes a lot of sense. I'm kind of wondering if it's the little driver board inside the monitor that interprets signals going bad, or the actual panel itself. If the actual LCD panel is still good, it seems a waste to throw the whole thing away. Otherwise, I guess it's trash the moment it fails completely, since it's a fairly nice monitor and whatever I replace it with probably won't be half as cool as this one, probably a business-grade SyncMaster or something.
 

Starfalcon

Gawd
Joined
Jan 7, 2020
Messages
640
Yeah I agree it is likely the driver board, as if it was the panel it wouldnt just be able to fix itself. As for my replacement, I got a samsung C32G75TQSN 240 hertz monitor. It is way faster than my previous one, and I would say better. Plus I got it on sale around christmas and paid less for it than I did my previous samsung. May want to check it out for a replacement also.
 
Top