Samsung 840 Pro SSD Review @ [H]

Hugh_Briggs

[H] SSD Guru
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such am emphatic reply! I mistook your post for saying that prefetch was better than SSDs.
If there weren't a difference with faster storage, however, why would you go to the trouble to attempt to cache everything on a faster medium?
You would probably benefit from a ramdisk program with that much ram at your disposal. I would recommend you give FancyCache a try. It is fantastic.
 

player-x

Limp Gawd
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such am emphatic reply! I mistook your post for saying that prefetch was better than SSDs.
Na, SSD is about as good as the invention of sliced bread, it rocks.

If there weren't a difference with faster storage, however, why would you go to the trouble to attempt to cache everything on a faster medium?
Not saying the 840 Pro is not a good SSD, what i am saying is, is that the 840 Pro is not worth the 35% price premium.


I don't say there are no scenarios ware you have a benefit's of a 840 Pro, just saying thats not very likely that it's worth the price premium on a desktop, even if thats a in a crazy Die Hard [H]ard|OCPer computer enthusiast.

As i am my self also all about speed, but only if i have real world use for it, not to trump my horn, that i have the fastest SSD.

I am years past the point on wasting tons of money on those kind of things, 64 or 32GB for Prefetcher is a lot smarter investment.

You would probably benefit from a ramdisk program with that much ram at your disposal. I would recommend you give FancyCache a try. It is fantastic.
Used it for a wile, and works real fine, but is not worth the hassle of using scripts to move games between memory and SSD all the time, and the lag in start up time of those games you have to move, if on average Prefetcher dose it almost as good, with a lot less hassle, and specially now that you can give certain files priority in W8 Prefetcher, just waiting on MS to release some documentation on it.

Till then i am happy with W7 Prefetcher.
 

choppedliver

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Jan 3, 2005
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479
so is the bug Anandtech reported *truly* fixed or is this the new IBM deathstar? I had 7 of those go bad back in the early 2000s, and after Hitachi bought them out, I'm still gun shy , years later, sensible or not.
 

johnnydoe

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The price is a bit steep but it can be justified by the 21nm flash/new controller and double the IOPS most high end SSD's have (which doesn't matter for regular usage as was pointed before, but still).

Personally, for that kind of price, I'd much rather get a pair of Comay Venus 3 128GB's to RAID0 instead. Twice as fast, and has the ability to safe-write unlike any other consumer SSD. The Comey drive is the only consumer SSD with a supercap to protect your data (last writes) in case of a power loss (I.E, lock-up, restart etc.).Out of every 100 times there's 1 time the data you're working on will be lost in the power loss. If that's a stuck Windows update, it means a corrupt Windows installion. More SSD's (in fact, all) need a supercap. It only costs about $10 per SSD and about time SSD makers gave two shits about it (they'd rather save that money in their pocket instead).
 

poppachocks

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I had never heard of these but took a quick look at an article on Tweaktown.
Nice looking exterior case!
89.00 @ Amazon, so a good value if the reliability is there.
 

johnnydoe

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I had never heard of these but took a quick look at an article on Tweaktown.
Nice looking exterior case!
89.00 @ Amazon, so a good value if the reliability is there.

It uses the reference SandForce SF-2281 PCB and the Intel 25nm MLC modules everyone else use (like Vertex MaxIOPS, Sandisk Extreme etc.). Reliability wise, it's no less reliable than any other SF-2281 SSD on the market. In fact, it's the most reliable consumer SSD due to having a supercapacitor. The only thing better is an OCZ Deneva 2, which is an enterprise SF-2281 that costs almost twice as much as the Comay.
 

JoeComp

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It uses the reference SandForce SF-2281 PCB and the Intel 25nm MLC modules everyone else use (like Vertex MaxIOPS, Sandisk Extreme etc.).

This statement is incorrect. Vertex MaxIOPS and Sandisk Extreme both use toggle flash, not ONFI flash, which is the only kind of flash of Intel.
 

johnnydoe

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This statement is incorrect. Vertex MaxIOPS and Sandisk Extreme both use toggle flash, not ONFI flash, which is the only kind of flash of Intel.

I know, I only messed up on the nanometer part. Thought they were also 25nm like the Intel SLC. And you're wrong about it being the only kind of flash of Intel. Intel has been making 25nm SLC for a long time.
 

JoeComp

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I know, I only messed up on the nanometer part. Thought they were also 25nm like the Intel SLC. And you're wrong about it being the only kind of flash of Intel. Intel has been making 25nm SLC for a long time.

I am not wrong about Intel only making ONFI flash. There are only two common types of NAND flash, ONFI and toggle. Both types of flash can be made to be used as SLC or MLC (or TLC).

It has nothing at all to do with the lithography size.

Please stop posting nonsense.
 

johnnydoe

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I am not wrong about Intel only making ONFI flash. There are only two common types of NAND flash, ONFI and toggle. Both types of flash can be made to be used as SLC or MLC (or TLC).

It has nothing at all to do with the lithography size.

Please stop posting nonsense.

I'm not posting nonsense. Show me where I said Intel making Toggle flash. Intel makes ONFI flash, Toshiba (for example) makes Toggle flash. I only said Intel 25nm MLC, you need some reading comprehension.
 

JoeComp

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I'm not posting nonsense. Show me where I said Intel making Toggle flash. Intel makes ONFI flash, Toshiba (for example) makes Toggle flash. I only said Intel 25nm MLC, you need some reading comprehension.

You really need to calm down and stop posting nonsense. I already quoted your incorrect statement. I will do so again:

It uses the reference SandForce SF-2281 PCB and the Intel 25nm MLC modules everyone else use (like Vertex MaxIOPS, Sandisk Extreme etc.).

I also already explained that Vertex MaxIOPS and Sandisk Extreme use toggle flash. They do not use "Intel 25nm MLC" flash.

Please stop posting nonsense. :rolleyes:
 

johnnydoe

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I also already explained that Vertex MaxIOPS and Sandisk Extreme use toggle flash. They do not use "Intel 25nm MLC" flash.

Please stop posting nonsense. :rolleyes:

I said the COMAY drive uses Intel 25nm flash, while being based on the reference SF-2281 PCB like the Vertex and the Sandisk Extreme. I was wrong on the flash types used on the Vertex and the Sandisk, but not on my original statement. Like I said, you need reading comphension.
 

raxstime

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Dec 12, 2012
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12
SAMSUNG 840 Pro
Newegg promo code
EMCYTZT2638
EMCYTZT2638
$30 off = $239 after rebate, free ship, no tax
12/12/12/ only
 

beowulf7

[H]F Junkie
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Mem is dirt cheap now, i payed 300 euros for it, my first 120GB ''Vertex 1'' was over 500 euro's, so its not that amazing anymore.


I bed you that you will not notice any difference between your m4 and this 840 in real world use, unless you do some +500 user database access on it or so.

My self i hardly notice a difference between my Vertex 3 and the 830 i also now have, ware the 830 double the IOPS has.

True that RAM is relatively cheap now, maybe an all-time low. For my new computer, i was debating 8 vs. 16 and I figured why the hell not splurge w/ 16 GB. :cool: I'm now maxed out, unless I sell my 4x4 and get 4x8 sometime in the future.

Yeah, the M4 is pretty fast, according to TomsHardware, a Tier 3 SSD (out of 10 tiers). Like someone else said, if it takes a fraction of a second to load an app (vs. an 840 Pro), I won't notice it. It should be seconds faster than loading apps from a traditional/magnetic HDD. I've never used an SSD before, so I'm looking forward to all the hype I've been reading about when it comes to SSDs. :cool:
 

Brahmzy

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SAMSUNG 840 Pro
Newegg promo code
EMCYTZT2638
EMCYTZT2638
$30 off = $239 after rebate, free ship, no tax
12/12/12/ only

Great price! Good golly there's some dumb-shit reviewers on Newegg, LOL. Some of them I recognize from this forum and Anandtech too, haha.
 

Hugh_Briggs

[H] SSD Guru
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103
You need to be very careful with supercapacitors fellas. They are typically only rated for a lifespan of three years, and also can start on fire, etc. This is why the majority of the enterprise market have moved to tantalum capacitors. Supercaps are dangerous, prone to failures (they actually add another point of failure) and also expire. They are not very good in high heat environments, that is where the whole exploding bit comes in.
You can go in and solder on a new cap after it wears out I guess, but not many would be comfortable with that. And I am most definitely saying it is even possible. Not sure.
 

johnnydoe

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You need to be very careful with supercapacitors fellas. They are typically only rated for a lifespan of three years, and also can start on fire, etc. This is why the majority of the enterprise market have moved to tantalum capacitors. Supercaps are dangerous, prone to failures (they actually add another point of failure) and also expire. They are not very good in high heat environments, that is where the whole exploding bit comes in.
You can go in and solder on a new cap after it wears out I guess, but not many would be comfortable with that. And I am most definitely saying it is even possible. Not sure.

Yeah, they do look a bit shitty, but are still reliable. The chance of it catching out on fire is extremely low, like %0.1. SSD's don't anywhere cause enough heat to make it a concern. If anything, the supercap makes the drive more reliable due to giving it the option the safe write, than to add one more potential failure point. They aren't there to fail. Though, I'm glad that my Deneva 2R SLC's have Tantalum's. I snagged a couple of these $1400 babies for $500 each on eBay. Deal of my life.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Deneva-2R-2...?pt=US_Solid_State_Drives&hash=item3ccc00cbc9
 

raxstime

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Dec 12, 2012
Messages
12
I signed onto this forum today, wanted to post Newegg promo under deals but needed minimum of 30 posts. I posted here instead and sent PM to guy posting thread on deals for 840 (not pro). Hope everyone needing one gets a good price. Everyone hates missing a promotion. LOL

Back to our technical thread discussion, sorry OP.
 

BatJoe

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Apr 4, 2012
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836
Noticed my Samsung Magician informed me of a new firmware. Downloaded and installed. Went fine. FYI.
 

Brahmzy

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Hmm. New firmware...

"1. Improved ''''dirty drive'''' write performance."

Interesting, it's version is 1.0.
 

Hugh_Briggs

[H] SSD Guru
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Dang a new FW hits right after i post the review? gah! If it helps with "dirty drive" write performance then it will be almost sure to increase the 4K steady results in the Iometer testing. Jesus if they get that metric up a bit more...

@raxstime- Welcome to the forums! :cool:
 

Brahmzy

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Dang a new FW hits right after i post the review? gah! If it helps with "dirty drive" write performance then it will be almost sure to increase the 4K steady results in the Iometer testing. Jesus if they get that metric up a bit more...

@raxstime- Welcome to the forums! :cool:

Get that thing back on the bench and revise the [H] review son! :D
 

RanceJustice

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I've just invested in a SSD a little while ago, but it hasn't arrived yet. (Likely, a 240-256gb variant. It seems cheaper to actually buy 2, 256 than a single 480-512 high end SSD these days!) and at the time when I ordered, it seemed as though the Corsair Neutron GTX was likely the best offering around, especially with its new controller. Now, it appears that the 840 Pro could be superior. I wonder if it is worth it to send my Neutron GTX back and consider an 840 Pro? Any benefits or detriments comparing the two that would make the Neutron GTX a better offering? Or is it just a smarter idea to go with the 840 Pro? Thanks
 

player-x

Limp Gawd
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Oct 22, 2007
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299
This is the comperison you have to look at.

51886.png


Yeah the 840 Pro is faster, will you notice it, not at all, and imo is the 840 Pro its price premium not worth.

I would just buy a m4 or 830, that has the best bang for buck ratio!
 

player-x

Limp Gawd
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Oct 22, 2007
Messages
299
These results are fresh out of box, and the SSD hasn't even been filled with data once. There are a multitude of reasons why this performance will never be observed in a real user environment. Here is a post with reasons for this.

http://hardforum.com/showpost.php?p=1039443816&postcount=23

Correct, but that counts for all drives, and if SSD A is 5% faster then SSD B, it will properly be the same after 1 year, even do both are degraded in speed, but A will be properly still be 5% faster.
Ofc it all depends on how good the trim command works.
 

Hugh_Briggs

[H] SSD Guru
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It also depends upon how efficient the GC and other internal works of the SSD perform. This is affected by TRIM.
Testing with fresh drives is pointless anyway. Some of the fastest SSDs in fresh condition are slower than other SSDs in steady state. So saying that SSD A is 5% faster in fresh out of box condition has no merit.
 

RanceJustice

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Is anyone aware of testing between the 840 Pro and Neutron GTX with "used/filled" drives and can illustrate any speed differences and/or any problems with reliability/durability, TRIM, any variances in conditions based on how it is run (ie as part of a RAID0, RAID5, JBOD on a RAID controller etc...). This is going to be my first SSD, so I want to ensure it is not only one that runs fast, but is reliable, has a good controller and runs well on Linux as well as Windows.
 

Bisectors Fore

Limp Gawd
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Dammit, the 128GB version was on sale for $120 yesterday on Amazon and I didn't buy it. Now it's back up to $144! :mad:
 
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