Ryzen 3950X, 3960X, 3970X Availability

Zarathustra[H]

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Processor arrived today, test boot was a success. Kept flipping through the same numbers on the board's readout, had me worried for a minute.
Heatsink inlet is a bit closer to my pump than I expected, need to get another 90 degree fitting, and of course my go to site is under maintenance (performance-pcs).
Need to also pick up a couple of bottles of distilled water.

5:40AM update: Site was up, ordered the fittings, overnight shipping. Build should be done this weekend. :D

When I finally get mine I'm going to have to do my build without a test boot. I don't have anything else but the water block I am buying that can cool a Threadripper :p

I can't say in 25 years of doing this I've ever had a bad motherboard or CPU out of box though. (Knock on wood)
 

notarat

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When I finally get mine I'm going to have to do my build without a test boot. I don't have anything else but the water block I am buying that can cool a Threadripper :p

I can't say in 25 years of doing this I've ever had a bad motherboard or CPU out of box though. (Knock on wood)

Only time I ever had a bad board out of the box was and AMD system from back in the day. It was a FIC PA-2013 I got for my K6-2 333

Lucky for me I got it from the computer show at the Agricenter in Memphis on a Saturday afternoon so I took it back and swapped it out Sunday morning...I kinda miss the old computer shows that used to come to town. All that different tech just lying out for you to examine and haggling with the vendors reminded me of all the times I spent at the Golden Shopping Arcade in Kowloon...man, that was like a mecca of tech...
 

vxspiritxv

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When I finally get mine I'm going to have to do my build without a test boot. I don't have anything else but the water block I am buying that can cool a Threadripper :p

I can't say in 25 years of doing this I've ever had a bad motherboard or CPU out of box though. (Knock on wood)

All I had was the waterblock, it's 900 grams of pure heatkiller heatsink (2 Lbs for us weirdos not using the metric system), take a bit for it to get heat-soaked.
I just kept my finger on it to make sure it wasn't hot, and I didn't go beyond the bios.
 

Zarathustra[H]

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All I had was the waterblock, it's 900 grams of pure heatkiller heatsink (2 Lbs for us weirdos not using the metric system), take a bit for it to get heat-soaked.
I just kept my finger on it to make sure it wasn't hot, and I didn't go beyond the bios.

Good idea!
 

tangoseal

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Only time I ever had a bad board out of the box was and AMD system from back in the day. It was a FIC PA-2013 I got for my K6-2 333

Lucky for me I got it from the computer show at the Agricenter in Memphis on a Saturday afternoon so I took it back and swapped it out Sunday morning...I kinda miss the old computer shows that used to come to town. All that different tech just lying out for you to examine and haggling with the vendors reminded me of all the times I spent at the Golden Shopping Arcade in Kowloon...man, that was like a mecca of tech...

Ahh yes kowloon, I've been in that multistory tech monstrosity as well. Singapore also has one similar that I've been too. Really fun places to get lost in. As I'm older now I could care less but when I was in my 20s freaking Jesus beams shined around the room when I walked in that place lol... a real adventure
 
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tangoseal

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All I had was the waterblock, it's 900 grams of pure heatkiller heatsink (2 Lbs for us weirdos not using the metric system), take a bit for it to get heat-soaked.
I just kept my finger on it to make sure it wasn't hot, and I didn't go beyond the bios.

2 lbs of waterblock? Surely you jest! Anyways I have an xspc raystorm TR3 block and I've yet, even under prime95 avx small fft to hit 70c.

I think threadripper 3 is just the alpha of alpha binnings
 
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somebrains

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2 lbs of waterblock? Surely you jest! Anyways I have an xspc raystorm TR3 block and I've yet, even under prime95 avx small fft to hit 70c.

I think threadripper 3 is just the alpha of alpha binnings

You should do a write up of your cooling system, or shoot a walkthru and upload to YouTube and link us.
I have a feeling that cooling guides are going to be important.
 

tangoseal

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You should do a write up of your cooling system, or shoot a walkthru and upload to YouTube and link us.
I have a feeling that cooling guides are going to be important.

Of course I'm not OCing all cores manually and I wont either. Under maximum possible load like avx2 prime all cores run about 38 to 3900mhz which is designed. If I enable pbo its about 41 to 42ish. Then settles lower but temps have never hit past 70c. That's at board issued 1.34v full load. I've seen half core loads at 1.1v too. I've hit 4.6ghz single core a few times but 4.5 tends to be more average.

Xspc raystorm tr3
A pump and hard lines
7x 120 worth of rads push only
Use your physical finger to evenly and thinly coat the CPU with noctua paste

Enjoy low temps

Use hwinfo64 and monitor your ccd temps or use Ryzen master.

Forgive the lack of ram. As I said in another post I have 16gb place holding in dual channel until a 32gb kit arrives for quad channel.

2019-12-04 13.35.08.jpg
 
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somebrains

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Xspc raystorm tr3
A pump and hard lines
7x 120 worth of rads push only
Use your physical finger to evenly and thinly coat the CPU with noctua paste

Enjoy low temps

Use hwinfo64 and monitor your ccd temps or use Ryzen master.

Forgive the lack of ram. As Insaid in another post I have 16gb place holding in dual channel until a 32gb kit arrives for quad channel.

View attachment 204519

What kind of pump?
Fan speeds at given temp, ramp points for those noise sensitive.
What kind of fans?
30mm thick rads?

7x120mm worth of rads single sided or push pull?

Bc that's a lot for some of these guys to pack into their cases.
They should know whether to switch from prevailing "small as you can get ATX/eatx" in their planning or triage stages.

How much intake are you running, or rads intake?
Which dad intakes?
 

thesmokingman

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Ya need to adhere to at least 360mm of rad surface per block. The rest should be obvious as it comes with the territory. Don't use a D5 if your gonna be running a lot of blocks unless you want a trickle of flow. If ya use thin rads, ya better go P/P. All this obviously takes a case with room to spare. PPL don't just accidentally find themselves running a TR3 setup.
 

tangoseal

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What kind of pump?
Fan speeds at given temp, ramp points for those noise sensitive.
What kind of fans?
30mm thick rads?

7x120mm worth of rads single sided or push pull?

Bc that's a lot for some of these guys to pack into their cases.
They should know whether to switch from prevailing "small as you can get ATX/eatx" in their planning or triage stages.

How much intake are you running, or rads intake?
Which dad intakes?

Holy moly questions Haha I'll answer more later when I have time.

Using a 7 year old swiftech normal thick 4x120 rad and an ek 3x120 about a year old normal thick.

Pump is Neochanger and fans are scythe ultra kaze controlled by corsair commander pro
No curves. I use headphones. Noisy under full speed. But I float them at around 40% fan speed because I have so much radiator space.

Again dont use funky curves. People that use curves with radiators do not understand water cooling. Water cooling is about consistent airflow no matter the load. It's about constant heat being transferred from water to air. Not oh let's quickly react and spool fans up and down all the time. It's about running low speed high pressure fans across an efficient spread of surface area sufficient to the wattage being dumped in to the heat exchangers.

I'm using my old Caselabs th10 case.
No longer a company. These are relics. I tried selling this epic case on H but no one bit now I am thankful they did not buy it.

I'm going to change back to my swiftech mcp35x pump and stand alone res soon. The neochanger is plenty of pressure but its bulky and I dont like the placement.
 

somebrains

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Holy moly questions Haha I'll answer more later when I have time.

Using a 7 year old swiftech normal thick 4x120 rad and an ek 3x120 about a year old normal thick.

Pump is Neochanger and fans are scythe ultra kaze controlled by corsair commander pro
No curves. I use headphones. Noisy under full speed. But I float them at around 40% fan speed because I have so much radiator space.

Again dont use funky curves. People that use curves with radiators do not understand water cooling. Water cooling is about consistent airflow no matter the load. It's about constant heat being transferred from water to air. Not oh let's quickly react and spool fans up and down all the time. It's about running low speed high pressure fans across an efficient spread of surface area sufficient to the wattage being dumped in to the heat exchangers.

I'm using my old Caselabs th10 case.
No longer a company. These are relics. I tried selling this epic case on H but no one bit now I am thankful they did not buy it.

I'm going to change back to my swiftech mcp35x pump and stand alone res soon. The neochanger is plenty of pressure but its bulky and I dont like the placement.

You think this is bad, deal with Dev with no experience as a sys admin finding out the hard way “serverless” makes them an SA, network admin, sec admin, Dba, etc.

Noise, operation, component specifics, power draw, thermal headroom are all going to be good to sticky.

Imagine those noise sensitive environments having to go with 3x420+ worth of rads on top of $150+ worth of “silent” fans.

where are they sourcing that ottoman sized case?
 
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tangoseal

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You think this is bad, deal with Dev with no experience as a system finding out the hard way “serverless” makes them an SA, network admin, sec admin, Dba, etc.

Noise, operation, component specifics, power draw, thermal headroom are all going to be good to sticky.

Imagine those noise sensitive environments having to go with 3x420+ worth of rads on top of $150+ worth of “silent” fans.

where are they sourcing that ottoman sized case?

I used to be a network engineer and know all about questions.

But all of the water can be avoided with a simple massive noctua heat sink fan. But water is so nice.

My 2080ti rarely passes 45c under full load. Sometimes crunching ray traces in games pushes it to 55c.

4k video engine (cuda) work doesnt even elevate it a single degree above ambient. Of course I cant measure that quantitatively.
 
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Zarathustra[H]

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Ya need to adhere to at least 360mm of rad surface per block. The rest should be obvious as it comes with the territory. Don't use a D5 if your gonna be running a lot of blocks unless you want a trickle of flow. If ya use thin rads, ya better go P/P. All this obviously takes a case with room to spare. PPL don't just accidentally find themselves running a TR3 setup.

My D5 (Ek D5 PWM G2) is able to get me about 0.95 gpm going through an EK full cover GPU block, an EK supremacy Evo CPU block, one 420mm (3x 140mm) Alphacool 45mm thick radiator and one 280mm (2x140mm) Alphacool Monsta (87.5mm thick) radiator, as well as a flow meter and a number of 45 degree bends and a couple of 90 degree bends.

I'm very happy with it, but maybe if you go crazy with rads it is insufficient.

I tune my Aquaero to control pump speed (based on block outlet temp) and fan speed (based on block inlet temp) to keep the loop water temp at 33C, which means my GPU always stays below 40C, usually 37C or below at load.

I'm not quite sure what to expect from the 3960x when I get it, but my best guesstimate is that during normal desktop and gaming use, temps will be lower (or fans slower) due to 7nm being much more efficient than my old 32nm CPU.

At all core full load - however - I expect it to be hotter. That said, my hexacore i7-3930k is at 1.445v and 4.8Ghz, so maybe not. It is a regular space heater at full load. Office is nice and toasty in the winter :p
 
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somebrains

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You're comparing a 32nm to a 7nm. Your going to see a massive difference. In performance and heat generation.

See, already your cooling solution is a refinement model other people are learning component and process particulars.
 

Zarathustra[H]

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You're comparing a 32nm to a 7nm. Your going to see a massive difference. In performance and heat generation.

...and I'm looking very much forward to it.

I expect a huge leap in performance, and much reduced heat output at comparable loads.

Where I am unclear what to expect is what happens at full CPU load. My existing CPU has a 130w TDP. This monster is rated at 280w.

Will my highly overclocked old 130W chip put out more heat at full load than the 280W current chip at the highest possible PBO settings? Who knows.

Even if the overclocking and voltage variable weren't in there, TDP ratings are so different between AMD and Intel and even within the brands that they are a mostly useless metric at this point anyway
 

mikeo

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I plan on using the noctua giant heat sink with two fans. I expect it to not generate that much heat when only a few cores are active gaming or with typical light use, for encoding / rendering don't really care if its noisy.
 

tangoseal

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I plan on using the noctua giant heat sink with two fans. I expect it to not generate that much heat when only a few cores are active gaming or with typical light use, for encoding / rendering don't really care if its noisy.

The noctua behemoth, I call it, is a very capable and solid performer. You will love it. Its ugly to look at but damn it actually works really well.
 
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blade52x

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Ya need to adhere to at least 360mm of rad surface per block. The rest should be obvious as it comes with the territory. Don't use a D5 if your gonna be running a lot of blocks unless you want a trickle of flow. If ya use thin rads, ya better go P/P. All this obviously takes a case with room to spare. PPL don't just accidentally find themselves running a TR3 setup.

I have not watercooled in a while, but I think the general rule of thumb is at minimum your power dissipated should match the radiator area (someone correct me if wrong). So if your CPU is going to be consuming 300W, you're going to want at least 300mm of radiator. Pumps, fans, etc will still all play a role too, but this is just a baseline.
 

Zarathustra[H]

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I have not watercooled in a while, but I think the general rule of thumb is at minimum your power dissipated should match the radiator area (someone correct me if wrong). So if your CPU is going to be consuming 300W, you're going to want at least 300mm of radiator. Pumps, fans, etc will still all play a role too, but this is just a baseline.

All depends on what you are going for. You can get away with smaller rads if you don't mind higher fan speeds.

If you want silence even at load, you are going to need lots of radiator capacity.
 

IdiotInCharge

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All depends on what you are going for. You can get away with smaller rads if you don't mind higher fan speeds.

If you want silence even at load, you are going to need lots of radiator capacity.

Just need a 3 x 3 x 140mm rad that's enclosed on the right side behind the motherboard...
 

notarat

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I have a TRACKING NUMBER! BestBuy didn't screw me over. They seemingly have passed on responsibility for that to the USPS...

Here's hoping it arrives, ever. :unsure:
 

tangoseal

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Just glad it's arriving so I can measure the tubing for the CPU loop. I won't be done with the build until Jan or Feb 2020 so...

Is this some kind of super build?


I like hard tubing because leak down test takes 3 mins of diligent inspection and your off to the races unlike soft tubing which takes all night to be safe.
 
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notarat

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Is this some kind of super build?


I like hard tubing because leak down test takes 3 mins of diligent inspection and your off to the races unlike soft tubing which takes all night to be safe.

I'd make faster progress but I have been negligent in getting my CEUs for the year so I will take the next week or two to do that, and then I'm working on some 3D models for some mods I'd like to do with motorized Helical Gears on the Reservoirs.
Is this some kind of super build?


I like hard tubing because leak down test takes 3 mins of diligent inspection and your off to the races unlike soft tubing which takes all night to be safe.

It's not a super build. Just have to take my time because there are some things I need to take care of first...and I need to 3D Print correctly-sized gears and find the correct electric motors for the reservoirs ;)
 

IdiotInCharge

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I'd make faster progress but I have been negligent in getting my CEUs for the year so I will take the next week or two to do that,

As a slave to CompTIA, I feel you.

It's not a super build. Just have to take my time because there are some things I need to take care of first...and I need to 3D Print correctly-sized gears and find the correct electric motors for the reservoirs ;)

Sounds like a decent blog-style post for [H] Overclocking and Cooling!
 

Zarathustra[H]

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Is this some kind of super build?


I like hard tubing because leak down test takes 3 mins of diligent inspection and your off to the races unlike soft tubing which takes all night to be safe.



Can you explain this better?

I've always considered hard tubing to be a much HIGHER leak risk based on how loose the tubing sits in the fittings.
 

notarat

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Granted it's only tangentially-related but I received my Phanteks Universal Vertical GPU mount today.
 

Zarathustra[H]

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Experience

I've been water cooling since some of you were born


Water-cooling hasn't even been a thing for computers for that long :p

I mean, some people were custom building stuff in the late 90's (and the 90's weren't even that long ago), but water cooling parts even for soft tube are a fairly recent thing, and hard tube even more recent than that :p

PC water-cooling with currently marketed consumer parts just isn't old enough to use that "since you were born" experience line, and any prior experience on different designs or custom configurations is not relevant, because the parts are not the same.

As an engineer, I have a high level of confidence in soft tube, and a very low level of confidence in hard tube until I have some data or evidence to change that, as I have seen how easily the hard tubes pull out of their fittings. That is all I was asking for.

I have nowhere near as much experience with water-cooling builds as some of you, but I have been doing it for a while now, and the only leaks I've ever seen have been in places not relevant to the tubing. Broken adapters and leaky swivels mainly.
 
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tangoseal

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Water-cooling ng hasn't even been a thing for computers for that long :p

I mean, some people were custom building stuff in the late 90's (and the 90's weren't even that long ago), but water cooling parts even for soft tube are a fairly recent thing, and hard tube even more recent than that :p

PC water-cooling with currently marketed consumer parts just isn't old enough to use that "since you were born" experience line, and any prior experience on different designs or custom configurations is not relevant, because the parts are not the same.

As an engineer, I have a high level of confidence in soft tube, and a very low level of confidence in hard tube until I have some data or evidence to change that, as I have seen how easily the hard tubes pull out of their fittings. That is all I was asking for.

I have nowhere near as much experience with water-cooling builds as some of you, but I have been doing it for a while now, and the only leaks I've ever seen have been in places not relevant to the tubing. Broken adapters and leaky swivels mainly.

I wasn't being snarky. It was more of just having fun kinda statement. But yes my first water cooling build was around 96. Water blocks and fittings were completely fabricated from imagination. Also pumps were fish tank pumps mostly and radiators were literally from autozone. Like little oil coolers etc... it was tough but fun.

Hard tubing when done right if using the right fittings and bends will seal better than a soft tube. A soft tube is made of plyable material that when it gets warm it softens and lose its frictional grip inside the compression fitting. Where as a hard tube uses more of a compression on the ring and not so much the tube. I've never had a hard tube leak on me but once because I didnt screw the fitting into the gpu tight enough. But I've had countless soft leaks.

Highest quality hardline fittings are best also 13mm tube and not 16mm is better. It holds better and flows with a higher velocity and pressure. That's what matters in water cooling. You want turbulence in the blocks so those 2 free electron pairs per oxygen molecule can absorb heat get excited and carry it to the rad where it wants to give it to the metal and the metal wants to give it to the air.
 

Zarathustra[H]

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Also pumps were fish tank pumps

Isn't this still where most water cooling pumps come from? Manufactured in bulk primarily for the fish tank market, purchased by water cooling specialty companies who dress them up with a pump top so you can attach fittings, and - in some cases - bling it out with LED's?

Highest quality hardline fittings are best also 13mm tube and not 16mm is better.

I appreciate the advice, but I have re-read this sentence a few times, and can't figure out if you are proposing 13mm or 16mm as the best?

Hard tubing when done right if using the right fittings and bends will seal better than a soft tube. A soft tube is made of plyable material that when it gets warm it softens and lose its frictional grip inside the compression fitting. Where as a hard tube uses more of a compression on the ring and not so much the tube. I've never had a hard tube leak on me but once because I didnt screw the fitting into the gpu tight enough. But I've had countless soft leaks.

Did you primarily use barb fittings or compression fittings for the soft tubes in your experience? My experience has been that once my compression fittings are tightened down, neither god nor man can get that tube off. I've never had a leak in the tube -> fitting interface.[/QUOTE]
 

notarat

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Water-cooling hasn't even been a thing for computers for that long :p

I mean, some people were custom building stuff in the late 90's (and the 90's weren't even that long ago), but water cooling parts even for soft tube are a fairly recent thing, and hard tube even more recent than that :p

PC water-cooling with currently marketed consumer parts just isn't old enough to use that "since you were born" experience line, and any prior experience on different designs or custom configurations is not relevant, because the parts are not the same.

As an engineer, I have a high level of confidence in soft tube, and a very low level of confidence in hard tube until I have some data or evidence to change that, as I have seen how easily the hard tubes pull out of their fittings. That is all I was asking for.

I have nowhere near as much experience with water-cooling builds as some of you, but I have been doing it for a while now, and the only leaks I've ever seen have been in places not relevant to the tubing. Broken adapters and leaky swivels mainly.

I was overclocking since back in the days when we de-soldered the clock cruytals from the motherboards and soldering in faster replacements (back in the 80286 days) and scavenging heater cores from Chevy Chevettes at the junkyard and braising copper piping to home made water blocks in 1990...so watercooling has been around for a while (Nearly 30 years)
 

Zarathustra[H]

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I was overclocking since back in the days when we de-soldered the clock cruytals from the motherboards and soldering in faster replacements (back in the 80286 days) and scavenging heater cores from Chevy Chevettes at the junkyard and braising copper piping to home made water blocks in 1990...so watercooling has been around for a while (Nearly 30 years)

I did that crystal thing on a Motorola chip once. It was interesting.

Yeah, water cooling has been around since the dawn of modern engineering, but not in a form that resembles the parts used today, thus that experience is pretty much irrelevant in any discussion regarding what does and does not leak when it comes to modern parts :p

Side note:

My 286 had jumpers on the motherboard which could be used for overclocking. There was no need to mess with timing crystals...

That and it didn't require extreme cooling. Stock it ran with no cooling at all, just a bare CPU.
 

tangoseal

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Isn't this still where most water cooling pumps come from? Manufactured in bulk primarily for the fish tank market, purchased by water cooling specialty companies who dress them up with a pump top so you can attach fittings, and - in some cases - bling it out with LED's?



I appreciate the advice, but I have re-read this sentence a few times, and can't figure out if you are proposing 13mm or 16mm as the best?



Did you primarily use barb fittings or compression fittings for the soft tubes in your experience? My experience has been that once my compression fittings are tightened down, neither god nor man can get that tube off. I've never had a leak in the tube -> fitting interface.
[/QUOTE]

I've used them all. Barbed fittings are best because the worm gear clamp you put on has herculean strength. I've had actual soft tube compression fittings leak so bad. But maybe your using newer better designs.

I was and am recommending smaller diameter water hard lines over larger diameter. I think its 12mm or 13mm for the smaller size. The big one l know is 16.

I recommend higher velocity over higher volume.
 
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Zarathustra[H]

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I was and am recommending smaller diameter water hard lines over larger diameter. I think its 12mm or 13mm for the smaller size. The big one l know is 16.

Are you in the U.S?

I've never seen water cooling tubing and fittings measured in metric dimensions. I'm all 3/8" ID, 1/2" OD.
 
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