Ryzen 1950x heats up my entire room, what can I do?

Vithar

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I like to run Ark: Survival Evolved on Epic with tons of mods and while my 1950X never gets too hot, usually about 40°C, my room is a different story. I have to keep the AC running at all times otherwise the whole room heats up like crazy.

What can I do to keep my CPU from heating up my room. Btw I use EVGA CLC 280mm for my cooling setup.
 

linuxdude9

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I run a box fan on the floor to blow air into the room to combat the problem. Otherwise, the rest of the place is cool, while my PC room is hot as hell.
 

fightingfi

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I added another ac vent in the ceiling to blow direct cool air towards the front of my case to blow cold air into rooms is much cooler overall though im running 9 case fans with a 200 mm on top ( antec 1200 case) with a 2700x though.........my temps are 40c on the pc side with a enermax 120 mm push pull config
 

Nenu

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This can be done in multiple ways from air just ducting to using open loop water cooling.
Yep.
Although its better to cool the radiator in the room if outside is hotter, then pump the hot air out.
 

travm

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Yep.
Although its better to cool the radiator in the room if outside is hotter, then pump the hot air out.
I'm curious why you think that's better?

It would be unreasonable to expect 40c temps though. They will be higher. Dumping heat into a room then using AC to remove it allows lower temps, but is painfully inefficient. Even if it's 40c outside you'll still get effective cooling into a radiator, just expect 60+ temps.
 

mda

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Realistically, heat generated will get dumped into your room somehow.

The three ways "around" the problem is to:

1. Vent the heat outside of your room
2. Cool the room better
3. Reduce the heat from the PC. This is probably the easiest to do, but will mean either downclocking, undervolting or replacing it with something cooler.
 

Nenu

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I'm curious why you think that's better?

It would be unreasonable to expect 40c temps though. They will be higher. Dumping heat into a room then using AC to remove it allows lower temps, but is painfully inefficient. Even if it's 40c outside you'll still get effective cooling into a radiator, just expect 60+ temps.
The reason you are using AC is because the temp outside is higher
If that isnt the case because your PC is dumping heat in your room, fair enough, turn the AC off and dump the heat outside the room.
Whichever is most effective.

btw I meant to use colder aircon air in the room to cool the PC, then dump, the heat outside the room.
I didnt mean keep the hot air in the room.
 
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Nobu

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Portable heat-pump A/c unit, or duct the heat out of the room/house. Any other "solution" (besides undervolting/downclocking) isn't really a solution, it's just moving the problem from one area to another. The A/C unit will be +100% efficient, and if you close off the room from the rest of the house it'll easily handle the heat. Next best would be an ice-bucket cooler, as the heatpump making the ice is similarly efficient (though maybe not quite as). Will also increase humidity in the room (whereas the A/C would dry the air), so keep that in mind.
 

travm

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Portable heat-pump A/c unit, or duct the heat out of the room/house. Any other "solution" (besides undervolting/downclocking) isn't really a solution, it's just moving the problem from one area to another. The A/C unit will be +100% efficient, and if you close off the room from the rest of the house it'll easily handle the heat. Next best would be an ice-bucket cooler, as the heatpump making the ice is similarly efficient (though maybe not quite as). Will also increase humidity in the room (whereas the A/C would dry the air), so keep that in mind.
The AC Unit is probably closer to 20% efficient.
But it is the easiest way to make the room cooler. thats what they do.

I'd personally move to alaska, but a window banger will help you out.
 

Nobu

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The AC Unit is probably closer to 20% efficient.
But it is the easiest way to make the room cooler. thats what they do.

I'd personally move to alaska, but a window banger will help you out.
Well, it depends on what you're comparing it to, I guess. But if a heat pump can heat an area 3-4x as much in a given time than a resistance heater, then I would expect similar efficiency when operating in reverse (although it will depend on the refridgerant's optimal performance range).

Obviously there aren't any resistance air coolers afaik, so that comparison doesn't mean much anyway...unless someone made a peltier a/c unit? I know they make dehumidifiers with'em.
 

Brian_B

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Well heating is easy.

Cooling is the hard part. All your really doing is shuffling heat around. The process of cooling puts off more heat than it cools down. The old childhood logic of standing with the refrigerator door open to cool off actually will heat the room up hotter.

Same thing with PCs.

You are always hamstrung by laws of thermodynamics. Thermal energy has to travel from high to low temperature. Any energy you add to a system will increase it's overall energy (as dumb and obvious as that sounds, it gets overlooked at lot), so it's temperature is going to go up. You can use some nifty tricks, like phase shifting (which is how your standard AC compressor works, by boiling and re-compressing refrigerant in a closed loop, or how an open loop water cooler works, by evaporating water off), but ultimately energy has to go from high to low, and you just have to figure out a way to make that happen.

Your best bet is probably room ventilation. Your PC can easily overwhelm the HVAC of a single room, especially if it's a bedroom or "bonus room", as those don't get designed with a lot of HVAC input.... but it probably won't overwhelm the HVAC of your entire house. If you can put additional HVAC registers in your room, or get some fans to pull air through the room from the house better, those are probably your best bang for the buck.

Adding in a window unit would work, but your likely to start overloading circuits. Room electrical is typically 15A, maybe 20A if your really lucky and had a good contractor. 15A is not much more than it takes to to run a 1kW PSU under full load (along with monitors and peripherals). Add in a wall unit that pulls 8-10A by itself and you start tripping breakers.
 

tangoseal

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Water chiller.....

Nope wouldn't work....thermal energy must go somewhere. All a water chiller does is take the heat from the CPU and blow it out of the heat exchanger.

I have a 12000btu window unit which is about a kw.

But I run my PC on 240v so I will never trip a breaker.

Keep in mind your power constraints If you add a window unit.

Since I was the one who ran all the wiring in my basement I ran 10ga romex to all the circuits and 20amp breakers for 120 and 20a for 240 if I remember correctly. So I can pull safely 1800watts on 120 and over 4kw on 240 before the 10 gauge even gets warm.

The 240 was for ham radio vacuum tube amplifiers which I dont use right now.
 
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Nenu

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Nope wouldn't work....thermal energy must go somewhere. All a water chiller does is take the heat from the CPU and blow it out of the heat exchanger.

I have a 12000btu window unit which is about a kw.

But I run my PC on 240v so I will never trip a breaker.

Keep in mind your power constraints If you add a window unit.

Since I was the one who ran all the wiring in my basement I ran 10ga romex to all the circuits and 20amp breakers for 120 and 20a for 240 if I remember correctly. So I can pull safely 1800watts on 120 and over 4kw on 240 before the 10 gauge even gets warm.

The 240 was for ham radio vacuum tube amplifiers which I dont use right now.
Neat.
Also PSUs are more efficient at 240V so you produce slightly less heat.
 

chameleoneel

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I like to run Ark: Survival Evolved on Epic with tons of mods and while my 1950X never gets too hot, usually about 40°C, my room is a different story. I have to keep the AC running at all times otherwise the whole room heats up like crazy.

What can I do to keep my CPU from heating up my room. Btw I use EVGA CLC 280mm for my cooling setup.
If your CPU is only 40C under load, your heat issues are probably from a different part of your PC. 40C is practically an idle temp.
 

BrotherMichigan

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If your CPU is only 40C under load, your heat issues are probably from a different part of your PC. 40C is practically an idle temp.

The temperature of his CPU is irrelevant; it produces as much heat as the power it consumes. Using a worse cooler, which produces worse temps, doesn't magically heat up the room more.
 

chameleoneel

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The temperature of his CPU is irrelevant; it produces as much heat as the power it consumes. Using a worse cooler, which produces worse temps, doesn't magically heat up the room more.
ok but you'd have to have an amazing cooler for a loaded 1950x to be 40C.

My point is that I bet his CPU isn't really blowing off that much heat and its probably another part.
 

Verdi

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What can I do to keep my CPU from heating up my room

All the ways i can think of:

1. Find a way to dump the heat to outside instead of in your room, be it by ducting exausts or placing the radiators outside.
2. Increase room ventilation, perhaps by opening windows or using table fans. If possible place the PC in a point where airflow is higher.
3. Limit heat generation by undervolting/downclocking.
4. Use air conditioning. By doing so should lower your room air exchange rate to close to zero, so pretty much all the heat generated by the PC will have to be removed by the AC. You will be spending electrical energy equivalent to around 20-50% of the total heat genereted by the PC to remove it, depending on a lot of factors (inside and outside temperature and humidity, AC design, load, etc etc).
5. Wait for (or find out a way to trigger) some catastrophic event that lowers the ammount of sunlight that reaches Earth's surface, lowering global temperatures and triggering another ice age, keeping both your room and your PC running cool.
 

travm

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All the ways i can think of:
4. Use air conditioning. By doing so should lower your room air exchange rate to close to zero, so pretty much all the heat generated by the PC will have to be removed by the AC. You will be spending electrical energy equivalent to around 20-50% of the total heat genereted by the PC to remove it, depending on a lot of factors (inside and outside temperature and humidity, AC design, load, etc etc).
.
All good answers. But, your percentages are wrong. Its more like 150% to 200% of the total heat generated in energy costs. No system can convert energy like that. It always takes more energy, not less. In some fancy laboratories i'm sure we've gotten really close to 100% efficiency. In a vacuum, with maglev bearings, and all sorts of other things that dont actually work in real world machines.
I had to, 2nd post in this thread thats suggested AC units are more than 100% efficient. They are not.
 

Nobu

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All good answers. But, your percentages are wrong. Its more like 150% to 200% of the total heat generated in energy costs. No system can convert energy like that. It always takes more energy, not less. In some fancy laboratories i'm sure we've gotten really close to 100% efficiency. In a vacuum, with maglev bearings, and all sorts of other things that dont actually work in real world machines.
I had to, 2nd post in this thread thats suggested AC units are more than 100% efficient. They are not.
An 800W portable AC unit would use... 800W max to cool his room, or 400W avg with a 50% duty cycle. If it was 100% efficient, and If your whole PC produced 400W of heat, what he said would be conservative. But it's not, it has a fan and a compressor which are generating heat and the hoses aren't perfectly insulated. Still, if you are able to drop the temperature by 10°F and dump 80% of the waste heat outside... well, it gets above my head about this point.

Anyway, he was just commenting on the amount of energy it would take to move (not cool, because that's not what heat pumps do) an equivalent amount of heat. 50% seems reasonable to me, between the compressor and one or two fans. If I had to use more than that for my car, I would never turn on my ac.
 

Verdi

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All good answers. But, your percentages are wrong. Its more like 150% to 200% of the total heat generated in energy costs. No system can convert energy like that. It always takes more energy, not less. In some fancy laboratories i'm sure we've gotten really close to 100% efficiency. In a vacuum, with maglev bearings, and all sorts of other things that dont actually work in real world machines.
I had to, 2nd post in this thread thats suggested AC units are more than 100% efficient. They are not.

Nah, look up coefficient of performance. In very imprecise terms, refrigeration systems are not converting energy, they are "pumping" heat from a cold reservoir (inside) to a hot reservoir (outside). You can move much more energy (from one reservoir to another) than the amount of energy you are providing the system. For example, my AC unit has a COP of 3.14, meaning that for every W provided to the system, it will remove 3.14 W from my room (for very specific operating conditions, depending on conditions results will be very different).

That's why heat pumps are used instead of electrical resistances for room heating. Using a resistence heats the room by 100% of the electrical energy provided, while a heat pump will heat it much more using the same amount of energy. In fact, the COP of a heat pump is always over 1.

That does not mean, of course, that the electrical motor, or the compressor, can have more than 100% efficiency.
 
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Jandor

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A mobile A/C unit is around 200 dollars. It's probably the cheapest solution, no fuss to your problem. This is the case of any computer/server room on most small businesses. Bigger computer or several computers need an A/C cooler in the room.
 

mikeo

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Move the rig to your basement or another room, then get a really long hdmi cable and some usb extension cables. Also works if your video card is loud and you don't want to hear the fans.
 
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