Replacement power supply for Hiper Type M 730 w

digifabb

n00b
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Nov 8, 2020
Messages
3
My Hiper Type M 730 w blew out on a line power failure.

I have been unable to find a replacement.

As I don't know anything about power supplies, can anyone point me to a viable replacement?

Any brand, used or new, as long as it fits into the machine and has a plug-and-play cable harness.

Thank you for any suggestions.
 

Nenu

[H]ardened
Joined
Apr 28, 2007
Messages
19,538
Best of are Seasonic Prime.
You get a huge warranty too.
 

GiGaBiTe

[H]ard|Gawd
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Apr 26, 2013
Messages
1,437
That power supply is almost 15 years old, you won't find one of those anywhere new.

It looks like a standard ATX form factor supply that is a bit longer than normal. Any modern ATX supply should fit, the problem is what machine this supply is in. If the machine is also circa 15 years old, you may have a problem with the power rails on a modern supply not being "strong" enough. PSUs from back then had more of their capacity on the 5v rail (yours has 30 amps), while modern 750W PSUs have less (around 22 amps on ones I looked at.) So you may have to go up in wattage rating on a modern supply if you have an old machine with high draw on the 5v rail.
 

digifabb

n00b
Joined
Nov 8, 2020
Messages
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That power supply is almost 15 years old, you won't find one of those anywhere new.

It looks like a standard ATX form factor supply that is a bit longer than normal. Any modern ATX supply should fit, the problem is what machine this supply is in. If the machine is also circa 15 years old, you may have a problem with the power rails on a modern supply not being "strong" enough. PSUs from back then had more of their capacity on the 5v rail (yours has 30 amps), while modern 750W PSUs have less (around 22 amps on ones I looked at.) So you may have to go up in wattage rating on a modern supply if you have an old machine with high draw on the 5v rail.
Thank you for your help.

Considering these two:
https://www.ebay.com/contact/sendmsg?item_id=321167530128&recipient=kdmpower&message_type_id=16

https://www.google.com/shopping/pro...&ved=0ahUKEwiPrpu-hPbsAhXL3J4KHeb8ASYQ8wII6AU


they are both 850w, a little higher then the 730 w I am replacing, to compensate for my 15 years old system drawing 30A on the 5v lines.

My mother board has these requirements:
1x 24 pin connector on the mother board labeled EATXPWR
1x 8 pin connector on the mother board labeled ATX12V
5x 4 pin Molex connectors on various drives and fans.

Further Questions please:
Can Sata connectors be adapted to plug into 4 pin Molex and power the devices? Neither of the PSU I am considering have five 4 pin Molex. I saw images of Sata to Molex adapters!
Are extension cables available for 12v ATX and for Sata cables? In case the PSU does not have long enough cables for this older system.
Just to be sure: I checked the PSU failure by disconnecting everything and then putting a jumper on the 24 pin ATX connector. No fans turned, no power on anything.
I realize that what ever took out the PSU may also have damaged the motherboard but it is worth taking that chance.
Last question: Should I decide, just out of interest, to change the capacitors in the PSU, how will I know which they are and are they reasonably accessible?
BTW, I am from the vintage of tubes and very very old industrial electronics, which as you know, had very high and very dangerous voltages. EG, a CRT could hang onto 1000 + volts.
 

Kardonxt

2[H]4U
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Apr 13, 2009
Messages
3,323
The actual mobo and cpu specs would be useful, as well as what kind of devices are plugged into the molex cables.

Some general info.

1. Get a name brand PSU like Seasonic as suggested above. It's extremely unlikely that unit you linked actually puts out 800 watts. (the ebay link is private \ doesn't work)
2. SATA to Molex adapters are fine.
3. Extensions for all PSU cable types are available and work fine. You probably won't need them unless you have a very strange case or buy a super low quality PSU.
4. If you need to ask, how to know which caps to replace, and how to access them, you should just take the recapping option off the table.
5. There is a good chance the PC being repaired wasn't actually using 30amps of 5v, it was just something to be aware of. 15 years old at this point is still socket 775 and 939, most devices were 12v even then.
 

digifabb

n00b
Joined
Nov 8, 2020
Messages
3
The actual mobo and cpu specs would be useful, as well as what kind of devices are plugged into the molex cables.

Some general info.

1. Get a name brand PSU like Seasonic as suggested above. It's extremely unlikely that unit you linked actually puts out 800 watts. (the ebay link is private \ doesn't work)
2. SATA to Molex adapters are fine.
3. Extensions for all PSU cable types are available and work fine. You probably won't need them unless you have a very strange case or buy a super low quality PSU.
4. If you need to ask, how to know which caps to replace, and how to access them, you should just take the recapping option off the table.
5. There is a good chance the PC being repaired wasn't actually using 30amps of 5v, it was just something to be aware of. 15 years old at this point is still socket 775 and 939, most devices were 12v even then.
Thank you again for your help. I think I have all I need now.
Just out of curiosity, I took the failed PSU apart this morning. The two big caps are fine. I could put a volt meter on them, watch them slowly discharge from 164v down to almost nothiing.
I Googled for most common problems. They spoke about a 2200 MF cap as a common problem. There is one but it does not show any physical problems. Anyway, I will let it go at that. I tried.
Because this computer has served its purpose, I will discard it but there is some data on its drives that I really would like to retrieve if I can. For that reason, I am being cheap. Even though I know it is always the cheap man who pays the most.

The molex adaptor input together with the extension cables and now knowing that the cables intended for SATA will also work with adapters to plug into the molex, I think I am all set.

Out of respect and gratitude to you, I may opt for the $75 PSU as opposed to the No Brand $54. That would be reasonable. It could still turn out that more than the PSU failed and if the MB is toast I will just lose the data.

Thanks again.
 

GiGaBiTe

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Apr 26, 2013
Messages
1,437
https://www.ebay.com/contact/sendmsg?item_id=321167530128&recipient=kdmpower&message_type_id=16

https://www.google.com/shopping/pro...&ved=0ahUKEwiPrpu-hPbsAhXL3J4KHeb8ASYQ8wII6AU

they are both 850w, a little higher then the 730 w I am replacing, to compensate for my 15 years old system drawing 30A on the 5v lines.

Can't see the first and the second looks like an IED. The second is also ridiculously overpriced for being a generic chineseium unit. Here is a fully modular Corsair 850W PSU for way less.
https://www.newegg.com/corsair-rmx-...a-850w/p/N82E16817139234?Item=N82E16817139234

Last question: Should I decide, just out of interest, to change the capacitors in the PSU, how will I know which they are and are they reasonably accessible?

Recapping the supply is an option, but it can take quite a bit of time to do depending on the internals of the supply. Normal ATX supplies generally are laid out with enough room to get around in, but there are some that are a bear to do. I've recapped hundreds of PSUs over the years and some of them require removing sections of the PSU to get to some of the caps, and you do definitely want to replace every capacitor, even the tiny ones. Being in a hot box for 15 years is a lot of wear and tear on a capacitor.

You'll need a good soldering iron, I'd recommend at minimum a 40W iron, but a 60 or 80W iron would be better because PSUs have huge power planes that can suck the heat right out of a lower powered iron and make it impossible to melt solder. A good vacuum desoldering gun is also a plus, it makes things go a lot faster. Just make sure not to heat the new capacitors up too much or they'll be damaged.

Just out of curiosity, I took the failed PSU apart this morning. The two big caps are fine. I could put a volt meter on them, watch them slowly discharge from 164v down to almost nothiing.
I Googled for most common problems. They spoke about a 2200 MF cap as a common problem. There is one but it does not show any physical problems. Anyway, I will let it go at that.

Any capacitor inside the power supply has an equal chance of going bad. I've seen bad primary line caps (the large ones), bad intermediate stage caps, and bad secondary caps, as well as a mix of all of them. If the capacitors are bad for a long period of time, the DC current they start passing is really hard on components both upstream and downstream of them. An analogy you may be familiar with would be bad caps causing red plating on tubes. The same situation applies in modern electronics, but things usually burn or explode instead.

Seeing voltage on a capacitor doesn't mean it's good. You should get a cheap capacitance tester if you don't have one already, they can be had on Ebay for $20 or so and will tell you the capacitance and ESR of the capacitors. Just make sure they're out of circuit and discharged, or the tester will be damaged.
 
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