Remote backup for my NAS

doug_7506

2[H]4U
Joined
Oct 17, 2004
Messages
3,230
Hi all,

I have a desktop on a network with a NAS.

My desktop backsup to my NAS and I have a local HDD for my NAS to backup too. But I would like a remote place for my NAS to backup to as well in case of sudden fire or surge that kills both. What is my best option?
 

IdiotInCharge

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Jun 13, 2003
Messages
14,454
Any cloud provider that you can store your data encrypted to. Could be a commercial solution, could be a family or friend.

[remember that 'cloud' just means 'someone else's server']
 

doug_7506

2[H]4U
Joined
Oct 17, 2004
Messages
3,230
Any cloud provider that you can store your data encrypted to. Could be a commercial solution, could be a family or friend.

[remember that 'cloud' just means 'someone else's server']
Exactly. That's what I'm looking for.

What's the best option for doing this? Do any of the backup services (Carbonite etc) offer NAS backup?
 

acascianelli

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Feb 25, 2004
Messages
6,882
I have a local and a remote backup for my NAS. I have an external HDD connected by USB, and I have a Raspberry Pi running Raspbian as hardened as I could make it with a USB attached harddrive at my parents house across the county.
 

86 5.0L

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Nov 13, 2006
Messages
6,967
Mega is supposedly encrypted before it hits their servers, FYI, if you lose access to your account and lose the recovery key, youre SOL
 

cyclone3d

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Aug 16, 2004
Messages
13,564
You can do it in a roundabout way with any backup service.

I use Backblaze - unlimited space for 50-60 a year.

Since you already have a local drive to backup your NAS, just backup to the backup service from your local backup drive.

Some services do have plans that allow you to backup networked and/or external drives, but the plans cost more than the plans that are meant to only backup internal drives.

Some of them you used to be able to get around by mapping the network drives but not sure if that is possible anymore. They may have changed the code to block that.
 

Steve1123

n00b
Joined
Mar 12, 2016
Messages
34
The best option is to chose a cloud hosting provider who can provide back ups and especially at multiple geo-locations if required, you can also opt for customized Frequency of backups,
for example daily incremental backup, backup every 8 hours or 4 hours
 

Nicklebon

Gawd
Joined
May 22, 2006
Messages
649
Depending on your NAS you could use Cloudberry and then choose your storage provider based on whatever criteria is important to you. I prefer having full control of my backups, the encryption and most importantly the keysvs trusting the cloud providers. Cloudberry gives me that.
 

Col_Temp

n00b
Joined
Jun 1, 2020
Messages
41
The best option is to chose a cloud hosting provider who can provide back ups and especially at multiple geo-locations if required, you can also opt for customized Frequency of backups,
for example daily incremental backup, backup every 8 hours or 4 hours
I k now this is a bit old but in case others are reading.
I run a business who help people and businesses do backup.

There are several levels of backup to consider.
1. What are you backing up and how critical is that data?
By this I mean how much can you afford to lose. Is there a lot of data change every day or only bits and pieces. That really tells you how often you should be backing up. This comes down to how hard would it be to recreate data that was lost. The level of effort tells you how often. If its hard to recreate on most days than you need a solution that backs up multiple times during the day.

As to what you are backing up: If it just files and folders just about any service out there will do. BUT how much time do you want to spend re-installing programs, copying data, setting up your desktop and links? If you are like most of us. You have lots of stuff installed and it is a pain to re-install and reconfigure everything. If that is the case file / folder backup is NOT the best solution. It may be the cheaper way to go but has its drawbacks. Also remember that NAS do fail as well and too many people depend on there RAID enabled NAS to backup. Yes there may be a copy but if there is a problem in the RAID I have seen and tried to recover stuff from way to many that fail and the data is gone.

2. How long can you be without your data?
Do you have a continuity need? How long can you have your computer down before there are real problems? Does you backup provide a cloud accessible image? There are quite a few solutions out there now that don't cost a lot provide cloud based full imaging. You can literally launch your PC in the cloud and run programs etc until you fix you hardware failure. Then image that existing cloud down to your local hardware as if you never had the computer go down. So not only do you have full file/folder recovery for the odd file mishap but also full imaging and bare metal recovery.

there reall is no excuse for people not to have a full image in the cloud. If you want to know more let me know. Glad to help.
 
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